Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7750 - 7799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7800 - 7840 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (IC 1 - 49)
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Last updated April 30, 2017
Updated historical references, Dreyer NGC entries to current standards
WORKING 7800: Check Steinicke listings/data for any updates/errors
Check for updates in NED/LEDA data, add better "close-up" images where possible

NGC 7800 (= PGC 73177)
Discovered (Dec 24, 1783) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 12, 1828) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Pegasus (RA 23 59 37.0, Dec +14 48 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7800 (= GC 5039 = JH 2291 = WH II 10, 1860 RA 23 52 26, NPD 75 58.4) is "faint, pretty small, extended 39". The position precesses to RA 23 59 35.4, Dec +14 48 22, only 0.4 arcmin southwest of the center of the galaxy listed above and well within its outline, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1755 km/sec, NGC 7800 is about 80 million light years away, in good agreement with a redshift-independent distance estimate of 75 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.3 by 1.6? arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 7800
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7800
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 7800

NGC 7801
Discovered (Sep 8, 1829) by
John Herschel
A group of stars in Cassiopeia (RA 00 00 23.0, Dec +50 44 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7801 (= GC 5040 = JH 2292, 1860 RA 23 53 18, NPD 40 03.6) is "a cluster, pretty rich, pretty compressed, stars from 9th magnitude". Corwin quotes Herschel's description as "A double star in a tolerable cluster in which is one star 9 m." Dreyer's position precesses to RA 00 00 25.2, Dec +50 43 10, about 1.4 arcmin south of the double star that defines the position noted above, but given the size of the cluster (variously estimated as five to fifteen arcmin) the error is insignificant, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Long exposure photographs emphasize a multitude of faint background stars, making the scatter of brighter ones harder to notice. If it is assumed, based on the description as "pretty rich", that the cluster includes all the moderately bright stars in the region, then it is about 10 arcmin across. Whether the stars really are a cluster or just a random scattering of stars is a matter for further investigation.
DSS image of stellar group NGC 7801
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the double star associated with NGC 7801

NGC 7802 (= PGC 81)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 00 01 00.5, Dec +06 14 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7802 (= GC 5041 = JH 2293, 1860 RA 23 53 50, NPD 84 32.1) is "very faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 00 01 00.1, Dec +06 14 41, within 0.2 arcmin of the center of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5325 km/sec, NGC 7802 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7802
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7802
Below, a 2.4 wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7802

NGC 7803 (= PGC 101 = HCG 100a)
A member of
Hickson Compact Group 100
Discovered (Aug 5, 1886) by Lewis Swift
Also observed by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Pegasus (RA 00 01 20.0, Dec +13 06 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7803 (Swift list VI (#98), 1860 RA 23 53 58, NPD 77 39.3) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, faint star very near to northwest". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 23 54 10. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 01 19.9, Dec +13 07 29, only 0.8 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, and the size and brightness of the galaxy and the 14th magnitude star to the northwest make the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5365 km/sec, NGC 7803 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.05 by 0.55 arcmin, it is about 75 thousand light years across. Its bright central core suggests that it is either a Seyfert or starburst galaxy. It is listed as a member of the NGC 7810 Group of galaxies, along with its companions (PGC 89, PGC 92 and PGC 108), with which it forms Hickson Compact Group 100.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7803, also showing PGC 89, PGC 92 and PGC 108, with which it forms Hickson Compact Group 100; also shown is PGC 97
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7803, also showing PGC 89, 92, 97 and 108
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7803

NGC 7804
Recorded (Oct 22, 1860) by
Gottfried Schweizer
Also observed by Basilius Engelhardt
Also observed by Sherburne Burnham
A 12th-magnitude double star in Pisces (RA 00 01 18.8, Dec +07 44 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7804 (= GC 6235, Schweizer, 1860 RA 23 54 09, NPD 83 01.9) is "very faint, a double star, nebulous?" and refers to an end-note which includes "Described as faint, extended, a little brighter southwest. v. Engelhardt in 4 observations could only see a double star without nebulosity". The first IC adds (per Burnham) "to be struck out, only a faint double star without nebulosity". Burnham was correct, as the position precesses to RA 00 01 19.0, Dec +07 44 53, almost dead center on the pair listed above, and the southwestern star is the brighter, so the identification is certain.
SDSS composite view of region around the double star corresponding to NGC 7804
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7804

NGC 7805 (= PGC 109, and with
NGC 7806 = Arp 112)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1790) by William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 17, 1827) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SAB0? pec) in Pegasus (RA 00 01 26.7, Dec +31 26 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7805 (= GC 5042 = JH 2294 = WH III 855, 1860 RA 23 54 18, NPD 59 20.5) is "extremely faint, small, round, suddenly brighter middle, stellar, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 7806. The position precesses to RA 00 01 27.2, Dec +31 26 16, only a quarter arcmin northeast of the center of the galaxy listed above, and the reference to the other member of the pair makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4810 km/sec, NGC 7805 is about 225 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across. NGC 7805 is interacting with its companion (NGC 7806), with which it forms Arp 112, so they must be at essentially the same distance from us (around 220 to 225 million light years away). The pair are listed as members of the NGC 7831 Group, along with NGC 7819, 7836 and more than a dozen other galaxies.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7805 and spiral galaxy NGC 7806, also known as Arp 112
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered near NGC 7806, also showing NGC 7805
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair of galaxies
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7805 and spiral galaxy NGC 7806, also known as Arp 112

NGC 7806 (= PGC 112, and with
NGC 7805 = Arp 112)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1790) by William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 22, 1827) by John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc? pec) in Pegasus (RA 00 01 30.1, Dec +31 26 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7806 (= GC 5043 = JH 2295 = WH III 856, 1860 RA 23 54 20, NPD 59 19.9) is "extremely faint, small, round, stellar, northeastern of 2", the other being NGC 7805. The position precesses to RA 00 01 29.3, Dec +31 26 52, only 0.4 arcmin northwest of the center of the galaxy listed above, and the reference to its companion makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4770 km/sec, NGC 7806 is about 220 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across (not counting the extended arc to its east). NGC 7806 is interacting with NGC 7805 (which see for images), with which it forms Arp 112, so they must be at essentially the same distance from us (around 220 to 225 million light years away). The pair are listed as members of the NGC 7831 Group, along with NGC 7819, 7836 and more than a dozen other galaxies.

NGC 7807 (= PGC 33)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Cetus (RA 00 00 26.6, Dec -18 50 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7807 (Ormond Stone list I (#271), 1860 RA 23 54 30, NPD 109 33.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, irregular figure". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 23 53 16, NPD 109 37.2. Howe's position precesses to RA 00 00 27.2, Dec -18 50 25, within 0.2 arcmin of the center of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7655 km/sec, NGC 7807 is about 355 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 345 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 350 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.75 by 0.5? arcmin, the galaxy is about 75 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7807
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7807
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7807

NGC 7808 (= PGC 243)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)SA0?) in Cetus (RA 00 03 32.1, Dec -10 44 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7808 (Muller list I (#272), 1860 RA 23 54 30, NPD 101 31.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round, stellar nucleus, 8.5 magnitude star 3 arcmin to southwest". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 23 56 23. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 03 33.3, Dec -10 44 13, only 0.5 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, and the star to its southwest makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8785 km/sec, NGC 7808 is about 410 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 395 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 405 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin, the galaxy is about 115 thousand light years across. NGC 7808 is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7808
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7808, also showing PGC 219
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7808

NGC 7809 (= PGC 158)
Discovered (Sep 9, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?? pec) in Pisces (RA 00 02 09.4, Dec +02 56 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7809 (= GC 6236, Marth #593, 1860 RA 23 54 56, NPD 87 51) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 00 02 06.2, Dec +02 55 47, one arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification seems certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 19195 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 7809 is about 895 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 830 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 855 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.4? arcmin, the galaxy is about 120 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7809
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7809
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7809

NGC 7810 (= PGC 163)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 17, 1825) by John Herschel
Also observed (Aug 5, 1886) by Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 00 02 19.1, Dec +12 58 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7810 (= GC 5044 = JH 2296 = (WH III 984), H. MS, 1860 RA 23 55 09, NPD 77 48.3) is "pretty faint, stellar, 2 stars in line to northwest". The position precesses to RA 00 02 19.1, Dec +12 58 29, within 0.2 arcmin of the center of the galaxy listed above, and the description of the nearby starfield makes the identification certain.
Discovery Information: This object, though observed by William Herschel, was not published in any of his catalogues. "H. MS" refers to its being recorded in Herschel's handwritten papers ("manuscripts"), and the designation III 984 was assigned to it by John Herschel based on where it would have been placed in Herschel's catalogues if it had been published (hence Dreyer's decision to place that designation in parentheses).
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5530 km/sec, NGC 7810 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across. The galaxy is the namesake of the NGC 7810 Group of galaxies, which also includes NGC 7803 and PGC 108.
SDSS image of region around lenticular galaxy NGC 7810
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7810
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7810

NGC 7811 (= PGC 168)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pisces (RA 00 02 26.4, Dec +03 21 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7811 (= GC 6237, Marth #594, 1860 RA 23 55 15, NPD 87 26) is "very faint, small, round, stellar". The position precesses to RA 00 02 25.2, Dec +03 20 47, about 0.4 arcmin southwest of the center of the galaxy listed above, barely beyond its outline, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7650 km/sec, NGC 7811 is about 355 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 345 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 350 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.4? arcmin, the galaxy is about 40 thousand light years across. NGC 7811 is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.5).
SDSS image of region around spiral galaxy NGC 7811
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7811
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7811
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Credit HST, WFPC2, STSCI)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 7811

NGC 7812 (= PGC 195)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)ab?) in Sculptor (RA 00 02 54.2, Dec -34 14 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7812 (= GC 5045 = JH 4010, 1860 RA 23 55 43, NPD 125 01.6) is "very faint, small, round, among stars". The position precesses to RA 00 02 53.7, Dec -34 14 49, about 0.6 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, but close enough to be certain of the identification.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6805 km/sec, NGC 7812 is about 315 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.7? arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region around spiral galaxy NGC 7812
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7812
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7812

NGC 7813 (perhaps but probably not =
IC 5384)
Recorded (1886) by Frank Muller (and later listed as NGC 7813)
Perhaps rediscovered (1899) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 5384)
A lost object, or a 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Cetus (RA 00 04 09.2, Dec -11 59 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7813 (Muller list II (#476), 1860 RA 23 56 04, NPD 102 46.0) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 80, 8.5 magnitude star 38 seconds of time to east, 9th magnitude star 40 seconds of time to northeast". Muller's position precesses to RA 00 03 14.3, Dec -11 59 13, which is obviously wrong, as there is nothing there, and the only 8th magnitude star in the region is practically on top of the supposed position, instead of tens of seconds of time away. As a result, what Muller saw (or thought he saw) may never be known. However, Howe found IC 5384 while searching for NGC 7813, and Dreyer was sufficiently convinced that Howe's nebula was the same as Muller's that he included this note in the second IC: "Howe only found a nebulosity in RA 23 57 00, NPD 102 45.8, extended 160, 8.5 magnitude star 49 seconds of time to west, two 9th magnitude stars 8 arcmin north (= IC 5384)". Both observers saw "an extremely faint, very small, extended" object, at essentially the same NPD (and declination), so equating the two objects seems reasonable (and has been the accepted since the second IC was published, more than a century ago). However, the descriptions of the surrounding star field are so different that it is hard to believe the two observers saw the same thing, and NGC 7813 is probably a "lost" object; but given a century of tradition, equating it with IC 5384 seems a necessity, if only for the purpose of historical discussion. (See IC 5384 for a discussion of the characteristics of that galaxy.)
DSS image of historical position of NGC 7813
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on Muller's position for NGC 7813 (shown by a box)
Below, an 18 arcmin wide region showing Muller's position and Howe's supposedly identical IC 5384
The two brightest stars at top left and the brighter one at far right agree with Howe's description
DSS image of region between the historical position of NGC 7813 and spiral galaxy IC 5384, which may or may not be NGC 7813
Note: The above image is centered at RA 00 03 42, Dec -11 59 10

NGC 7814 (= PGC 218 = PGC 1501809), the Little Sombrero Galaxy
Discovered (Oct 8, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 7, 1825) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)ab?) in Pegasus (RA 00 03 14.8, Dec +16 08 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7814 (= GC 5046 = JH 2297 = WH II 240, 1860 RA 23 56 05, NPD 74 38.9) is "considerably bright, considerably large, extended, very gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 00 03 15.2, Dec +16 07 53, about 0.8 arcmin south of the center of the galaxy listed above and on its southern outline, so the identification is certain. NGC 7814 is sometimes called the Little Sombrero, because of its resemblance to M104.
Physical Information: Based on its recessional velocity of 1050 km/sec, NGC 7814 is about 50 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 40 to 60 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 5.5 by 2.3? arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across. The galaxy is the namesake of the NGC 7814 Group, which also contains NGC 14, PGC 38, 332 and 889.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7814
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7814
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 7814
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST composite of the galaxy shows its broad dust lanes (HST/Wikisky cutout)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 7814

NGC 7815
Recorded (Oct 2, 1866) by
Herman Schultz
A 14th-magnitude star in Pegasus (RA 00 03 24.9, Dec +20 42 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7814 (= GC 6238, Schultz (Nova XII), 1860 RA 23 56 15, NPD 70 04.5) is "faint, small, a little extended, h 2300 to northeast", (JH) 2300 being NGC 7817. The position precesses to RA 00 03 25.2, Dec +20 42 17, within 0.1 arcmin of the star (listed above) that is thought to be Schultz' object, and NGC 7817 is to the northeast, so the identification is certain.
SDSS image of region near the star identified as NGC 7815, also showing NGC 7817
Above, an 18 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on "NGC 7815", showing the relative position of NGC 7817
The "bright" star below NGC 7815 is a 7th-magnitude object

NGC 7816 (= PGC 263)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 15, 1830) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 00 03 49.0, Dec +07 28 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7816 (= GC 5047 = GC 5048 = JH 2298 = JH 2299 = WH III 436, 1860 RA 23 56 39, NPD 83 18.1) is "very faint, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 00 03 49.3, Dec +07 28 41, almost dead center on the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5240 km/sec, NGC 7816 is about 245 million light years away. Given that and its 2.3 by 2.3? arcmin apparent size, it is about 165 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as being in a pair, presumably with NGC 7818, which lies only a few arcmin away and is listed as a disturbed member of a pair; but given the large difference in their recessional velocities, the pair is almost certainly only an optical double.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7816, also partly showing NGC 7818
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7816, also showing part of NGC 7818
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7816

NGC 7817 (= PGC 279 = PGC 1635017)
Discovered (Sep 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 25, 1827) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAbc?) in Pegasus (RA 00 03 58.5, Dec +20 45 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7817 (= GC 5049 = JH 2300 = WH II 227, 1860 RA 23 56 49, NPD 70 01.8) is "pretty faint, considerably large, much extended 45, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 00 03 59.4, Dec +20 44 59, only 0.2 arcmin east of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above and well within its outline, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2310 km/sec, NGC 7817 is about 110 million light years distant, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 75 to 100 million light years. Given that and its 3.5 by 0.9? arcmin apparent size, it is about 110 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a pair with NGC 7798, with a probable separation of about 2 million light years.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7817
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7817
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7817
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image showing NGC 7817 and its possible companion, NGC 7798
SDSS image of the probable galaxy pair, NGC 7798 and 7817
The image above is centered at RA 00 01 40, Dec 20 45 00

NGC 7818 (= PGC 288)
Discovered (Oct 23, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Pisces (RA 00 04 09.0, Dec +07 22 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7818 (Swift list VI (#100), 1860 RA 23 56 59, NPD 83 22.8) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, very difficult, southeast of h 2298", (JH) 2298 being NGC 7816. The position precesses to RA 00 04 09.3, Dec +07 23 59, about 1.2 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, but there is nothing else nearby, and its position relative to NGC 7816 makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6200 km/sec, NGC 7818 is about 290 million light years distant. Given that and its 1.0 by 1.0? arcmin apparent size, it is about 85 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a disturbed member of a pair, presumably with NGC 7816, which is only a few arcmin away and also listed as a pair member; but given the large difference in their recessional velocities, the two galaxies are almost certainly only an optical double.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7818, also showing part of NGC 7816
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7818, also showing part of NGC 7816
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7818

NGC 7819 (= PGC 303)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1872) by
Ralph Copeland
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b?) in Pegasus (RA 00 04 24.5, Dec +31 28 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7819 (= 6239, Copeland using Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope, 1860 RA 23 57 11, NPD 59 18.3) is "extremely faint, large". The position precesses to RA 00 04 21.7, Dec +31 28 29, only 0.7 arcmin west of the center of the galaxy listed above and within its outline, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4960 km/sec, NGC 7819 is about 230 million light years distant. Given that and its 1.5 by 1.2? arcmin apparent size, it is about 100 thousand light years across. NGC 7819 is listed as a member of the NGC 7831 Group, along with NGC 7805, 7806, 7836 and more than a dozen other galaxies.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7819
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7819
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7819

NGC 7820 (= PGC 307)
Discovered (Sep 24, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 00 04 30.9, Dec +05 11 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7820 (= GC 5050 = JH 2301, 1860 RA 23 57 20, NPD 85 34.8) is "pretty faint, very small, very suddenly much brighter middle, 14th magnitude star to southwest". The position precesses to RA 00 04 30.3, Dec +05 11 59, almost dead center on the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3055 km/sec, NGC 7820 is about 140 million light years distant. Given that and its 1.3 by 0.6? arcmin apparent size, it is about 55 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7820
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7820
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7820

NGC 7821 (= PGC 367 = PGC 897662 = PGC 897667)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd? pec) in Cetus (RA 00 05 16.5, Dec -16 28 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7821 (Ormond Stone list I (#273), 1860 RA 23 57 30, NPD 107 16.0) is "very faint, pretty small, irregular figure, gradually a little brighter middle". The first IC lists a corrected RA (per Ormond Stone) of 23 58 07. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 05 16.9, Dec -16 29 13, only 0.6 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7410 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 7821 is about 345 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 335 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 340 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 0.5? arcmin, the galaxy is about 145 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7821
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7821
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7821

NGC 7822
Discovered (Nov 16, 1829) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Oct 9, 1901) by Isaac Roberts
An emission nebula in Cepheus (RA 00 03 36.0, Dec +67 09 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7822 (= GC 5051 = JH 2302, 1860 RA 23 57 33, NPD 22 06.3) is "a remarkable object, most extremely faint, most extremely large". The second Index Catalog adds (per Roberts, M.N. lxiii, p 301) "40 arcmin diameter, many stars involved". The position precesses to RA 00 04 45.7, Dec +68 40 29, which is a degree and a half to the north of the central part of the nebula listed above, and has led to much confusion as to what part of the nebula Herschel saw. As a result, many catalogs and websites list the bright central region as Cederblad 214B, and the faint wing to its north as NGC 7822. However, per Corwin, although there may be some confusion about what Herschel saw, there is no doubt that Roberts' measurements were of the bright center, and that is what he and Dreyer presumed was Herschel's object. So whatever Herschel saw, the central part of the nebula has been considered to be NGC 7822 for more than a century.
Physical Information: NGC 7822 is a large, complex emission nebula, filled with hot young stars recently formed from and heating its gases, and partially obscured by dark lanes of gas and dust lying between us and the brighter emission region. The emission nebula covers at least 3 degrees, which at its distance of nearly 3000 light years makes it 150 light years across. The loose cluster (or association) of stars near its center contains about 40 O and B stars, of which type O7 is the "earliest", or hottest. This implies an age of 5 to 6 million years for the association.
DSS image of central portion of emission nebula NGC 7822
Above, a 1.5 degree wide DSS image of the central region of NGC 7822
Below, a ? degree image of the central and northern portion (Image Credit Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of central portion of emission nebula NGC 7822 and the region to its north
Below, a 4 degree wide DSS image of the nebula (the pie-shaped cutout at right is a contrast error)
DSS image of emission nebula NGC 7822
Below, an enhanced version of the image above (Image Credit Davide De Martin/ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator)
DSS image of region near emission nebula NGC 7822, enhanced with NASA PhotoShop FITS Liberator software
Below, a 1.5 degree portion of the FITS image, similar to the DSS image at top
DSS image of central portion of emission nebula NGC 7822, color-enhanced with FITS Liberator software

NGC 7823 (= PGC 328 = PGC 349667 = PGC 349695)
Discovered (Aug 11, 1836) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Tucana (RA 00 04 45.8, Dec -62 03 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7823 (= GC 5052 = JH 4011, 1860 RA 23 57 35, NPD 152 50.7) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 00 04 43.5, Dec -62 03 55, only 0.6 arcmin southwest of the center of the galaxy listed above and within its outline, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4540 km/sec, NGC 7823 is about 210 million light years distant. Given that and its 1.1 by 1.0? arcmin apparent size, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7823
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7823
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7823

NGC 7824 (= PGC 354)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Pisces (RA 00 05 06.2, Dec +06 55 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7824 (= GC 5053 = JH 2303, 1860 RA 23 57 54, NPD 83 51.5) is "pretty faint, small, round, 10th magnitude star to northwest". The position precesses to RA 00 05 04.4, Dec +06 55 17, only 0.5 arcmin west of the center of the galaxy listed above and within its outline, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6130 km/sec, NGC 7824 is about 285 million light years distant, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 260 to 285 million light years. Given that and its 1.6 by 1.2? arcmin apparent size, it is about 135 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as a member of a pair with 9 arcmin distant PGC 366. If at the same distance from us, the two are about 750 thousand light years apart.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7824
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7824
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7824
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered between NGC 7824 and PGC 366
SDSS image of region between NGC 7824 and PGC 366
The image above is centered at RA 00 05 10, Dec +06 50 40

NGC 7825 (= PGC 1279700)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 00 05 06.7, Dec +05 12 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7825 (= GC 5054 = JH 2304, 1860 RA 23 57 58, NPD 85 33.9) is "very faint, small, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 00 05 08.4, Dec +05 12 53, only 0.8 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8055 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 7825 is about 375 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 365 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 370 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.2? arcmin, the galaxy is about 65 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7825, also showing NGC 7827
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7825, also showing NGC 7827
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7825

NGC 7826
Discovered (Dec 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Sep 16, 1830) by John Herschel
An asterism (group of stars) in Cetus (RA 00 05 15.0, Dec -20 42 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7826 (= GC 5055 = JH 2305 = WH VIII 29, 1860 RA 23 58 02, NPD 111 29.6) is "a cluster, very poor, very little compressed". Corwin quotes John Herschel's GC: "A triangular group of about a dozen stars"; then adds that the stars are pretty bright, and cover a region about 9 by 13 arcmin with its apex to the south. For such loose clusters, different catalogs list slightly different positions, as the center can't be accurately defined. Steinicke's position (listed above) lies between a pair of stars near the center. Herschel's position precesses to RA 00 05 11.8, Dec -20 42 49, the position of the western member of the pair, so the identification of the group is certain. However, whether the stars are really a cluster or just a random scattering is unknown.
Composite of SDSS and DSS images of the group of stars known as NGC 7826
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on Herschel's position for NGC 7826

NGC 7827 (= PGC 378)
Discovered (Sep 25, 1830) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Pisces (RA 00 05 27.7, Dec +05 13 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7827 (= GC 5056 = JH 2306, 1860 RA 23 58 18, NPD 85 33.5) is "very faint, small, round, 12 or 13th magnitude star to northeast". The position precesses to RA 00 05 28.4, Dec +05 13 17, only 0.2 arcmin east of the center of the galaxy listed above and well within its outline, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5295 km/sec, NGC 7827 is about 245 million light years distant. Given that and its 1.2 by 0.9? arcmin apparent size, it about 85 thousand light years across. NGC 7827 is listed as the namesake of the NGC 7827 Group (as the only NGC object in the group).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 7827, also showing NGC 7825
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7827, also showing NGC 7825
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 7827

NGC 7828 (= PGC 483, and with
NGC 7829 = Arp 144)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Im? pec (Ring B)) in Cetus (RA 00 06 27.1, Dec -13 24 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7828 (Leavenworth list II (#274), 1860 RA 23 58 46, NPD 104 11.0) is "extremely faint, small, extended 130, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus, 15th magnitude star to southeast, NGC 7829 20 arcsec away at position angle 100". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 23 59 17. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 06 26.7, Dec -13 24 13, about 0.7 arcmin to the north of the galaxy listed above, but close enough to be certain of the identification even without the accurate description given for the relative position of NGC 7828 and its companion, NGC 7829. Both galaxies are distorted by the gravitational (and possibly collisional?) effects of their interaction, leading to the pair's inclusion in Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as Arp 144.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5730 km/sec, NGC 7828 is about 265 million light years away (and obviously at the same distance as its companion). Given that and its 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin apparent size, it is about 70 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region around peculiar irregular galaxy NGC 7828 and peculiar lenticular galaxy NGC 7829, collectively known as Arp 144; also shown is PGC 475, also known as Arp 51
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 7828, also showing PGC 475 (= Arp 51)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of Arp 144 from the Arp Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies
Arp Atlas image of Arp 144, consisting of peculiar irregular galaxy NGC 7828 and peculiar lenticular galaxy 7829

NGC 7829 (= PGC 488, and with
NGC 7828 = Arp 144)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec (Ring A)) in Cetus (RA 00 06 29.1, Dec -13 25 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7829 (Leavenworth list II (#275), 1860 RA 23 58 46, NPD 104 11.0) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round (nebulosity?), eastern of 2, 20 arcsec from NGC 7828 at position angle 100", NGC 7828 being the "western of 2". The second IC adds (per Howe) "only a 13th-magnitude star". Since Howe dismissed the object as a star, Dreyer did not bother to list a corrected position for NGC 7829; but since Leavenworth gave the same position for the two galaxies (save for their 20 arcsec separation), any error in the general position of NGC 7829 is irrelevant, as his correct description of the pair's relative position means that the certain identification of NGC 7828 makes the identification of NGC 7829 equally certain. Most importantly, NGC 7829 is indeed a galaxy, which forms a close pair with NGC 7828. Both galaxies are distorted by the gravitational (and possibly collisional?) effects of their interaction, leading to the pair's inclusion in Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as Arp 144.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5715 km/sec, NGC 7829 is about 265 million light years away (and obviously at the same distance as its companion). Given that and its 0.7 by 0.7? arcmin apparent size, it is about 55 thousand light years across. (See NGC 7828 for images of the pair and the region near them.)

NGC 7830
Recorded (Nov 29, 1864) by
Albert Marth
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 13th-magnitude star in Pisces (RA 00 06 02.2, Dec +08 20 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7830 (= GC 6240, Marth #595, 1860 RA 23 59 01, NPD 82 24) is "extremely faint, nebulous 13th magnitude star". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Bigourdan) of 23 58 49. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 05 59.6, Dec +08 22 47, over 2 arcmin northwest of the nearest suitable star, but other discoveries made by Marth on the same night (such as NGC 7837 and 7838) have similar errors, so it appears that the error is a consistent one, and the star listed above is almost certainly what Marth observed.
SDSS image of the region near the star listed as NGC 7830
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7830 (the box shows the NGC position)

NGC 7831 (=
IC 1530 = PGC 569 = PGC 86782)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 7831)
Discovered (Sep 7, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1530)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Andromeda (RA 00 07 19.3, Dec +32 36 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7831 (Swift list II (#1), 1860 RA 23 59 06, NPD 58 18.3) is "extremely faint, very small, much extended, very faint star very near". The position precesses to RA 00 06 17.7, Dec +32 28 28, over a minute of time west and 8 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above. But as noted for NGC 6, Swift made the same error for several objects discovered on the same night, so the consistency of the error and his descriptions of the nearby star fields have allowed for correct identification of the objects. Per Corwin, for NGC 7831 Swift noted "bright star south, very faint star very near", the "bright" star presumably being the magnitude 9.5 star about 2 arcmin south of the galaxy, and the "very faint" star being the 15th-magnitude star at its southwestern end. So despite Swift's positional error, the identification seems certain. However, his error did mean that when Bigourdan made a correct measurement of the position it was thought that he had discovered a separate object; hence the double listing.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5075 km/sec, NGC 7831 is about 235 million light years distant, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 205 to 250 million light years. Given that and its 1.7 by 0.4? arcmin apparent size, it is about 115 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed as the namesake of the NGC 7831 Group, which includes NGC 7805, 7806, 7819, 7836 and more than a dozen other galaxies.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7831
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7831
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7831

NGC 7832 (=
IC 5386 = PGC 485)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7832)
Also observed (Oct 5, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 7832)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1896) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 5386)
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Pisces (RA 00 06 28.4, Dec -03 43 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7832 (= GC 5057 = JH 4013 = WH III 190, 1860 RA 23 59 17, NPD 94 29.8) is "very faint, very small, round, very gradually then pretty suddenly much brighter middle, two 9th magnitude stars to southeast". The position precesses to RA 00 06 27.1, Dec -03 43 01, only 0.3 arcmin west of the center of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is certain. (For a discussion of the double listing, see IC 5386.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6250 km/sec, NGC 7832 is about 290 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.9 by 1.0? arcmin, it is about 160 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 7832
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7832
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 7832

NGC 7833 (= 3 stars + PGC 1813988)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A group of four starlike objects in Pegasus (RA 00 06 32.6, Dec +27 38 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7833 (Bigourdan (#101), 1860 RA 23 59 21, NPD 63 08) is "a cluster, very small, very faint, 2.5 arcmin, nebulous?". The position precesses to RA 00 06 32.5, Dec +27 38 46, dead center on the asterism listed above, so the identification is certain. The group consists of three 15th to 16th magnitude stars and PGC 1813988, a 17th-magnitude galaxy discussed immediately below.
SDSS image of region near stellar group NGC 7833
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7833
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the asterism (3 stars plus PGC 1813988)
SDSS image of stellar group NGC 7833

PGC 1813988
Not an NGC object but listed here since part of
NGC 7833 (which see for images)
A magnitude 17(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pegasus (RA 00 06 34.1, Dec +27 38 28)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.15 by 0.15 arcmin; nothing else available.

NGC 7834 (= PGC 504)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Pisces (RA 00 06 37.9, Dec +08 22 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7834 (= GC 6241, Marth #596, 1860 RA 23 59 26, NPD 82 24) is "most extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 00 06 36.6, Dec +08 22 46, about 0.7 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, an error shared with two other galaxies discovered by Marth on the same night, the double nebula NGC 7837 and 7838. The three galaxies are close together, and their relative positions are correct, so the certain identification of the double nebula makes the identification of NGC 7834 equally certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5230 km/sec, NGC 7834 is about 245 million light years distant. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 0.8? arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7834, also showing NGC 7835, NGC 7837 and NGC 7838
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7834, also showing NGC 7835, 7837 and 7838
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7834

NGC 7835 (= PGC 505 = PGC 212467)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Pisces (RA 00 06 46.7, Dec +08 25 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7835 (= GC 6242, Marth #597, 1860 RA 23 59 35, NPD 82 21) is "extremely faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 00 06 45.7, Dec +08 25 46, about a third of an arcmin northwest of the center of the galaxy listed above, but barely outside its outline, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: The apparent size of NGC 7835 is 0.55 by 0.25 arcmin; apparently nothing else is available.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7835, also showing NGC 7834, NGC 7837, NGC 7838 and NGC 7840
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7835, also showing NGC 7834, 7837, 7838 & 7840
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7835

NGC 7836 (= PGC 608)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed by Guillaume Bigourdan
A 14th-magnitude irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Andromeda (RA 00 08 01.6, Dec +33 04 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7836 (Swift list II (#2), 1860 RA 23 59 35, NPD 57 50.7) is "extremely faint, very small, round, between 2 stars". The second IC lists a corrected position (per Bigourdan) of RA 00 00 47, NPD 57 42. The corrected position precesses to RA 00 07 59.6, Dec +33 04 46, only 0.5 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, making the identification certain. This is due to Bigourdan's accurate measurement, and not to Swift, whose position was off by more than a minute of time and 8 arcmin of declination. However, as noted by Corwin, this is one of five galaxies (such as NGC 6) discovered by Swift on the same night which all suffered similar errors; so the correct identification would have probably been made eventually, anyway. But it is nice that the error was discovered and corrected early on.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4905 km/sec, NGC 7836 is about 230 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 200 to 350 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.5? arcmin, it is about 60 thousand light years across. NGC 7836 is listed as a member of the NGC 7831 Group, along with NGC 7805, 7806, 7819 and more than a dozen other galaxies.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 7836
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7836
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy NGC 7836

NGC 7837 (= PGC 516, and with
NGC 7838 = Arp 246)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1864) by Albert Marth
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Pisces (RA 00 06 51.4, Dec +08 21 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7837 (= GC 6243, Marth #598, 1860 RA 23 59 41, NPD 82 25) is "extremely faint, western of double nebula", the other being NGC 7838. The position precesses to RA 00 06 51.7, Dec +08 21 46, about 0.7 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, and the reference to a double nebula makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 11700 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 7837 is about 545 million light years away; however, for such a distance it is necessary to take into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly half billion year journey. Doing so shows that the galaxy was about 520 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 530 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.2? arcmin, NGC 7837 is about 60 thousand light years across. The galaxy forms an interacting pair with NGC 7838, and as such is listed as Arp 246.
SDSS image of region around spiral galaxies NGC 7837 and NGC 7838, also known as Arp 246; also shown are NGC 7834, NGC 7835, NGC 7840 and NGC 3
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7837 and 7838;
also shown are NGC 7834, 7835, 7840 and NGC 3
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair, also known as Arp 246
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 7837 and 7838, also known as Arp 246

NGC 7838 (= PGC 525, with
NGC 7837 = Arp 246)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1864) by Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 00 06 53.9, Dec +08 21 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7838 (= GC 6244, Marth #599, 1860 RA 23 59 43, NPD 82 25) is "extremely faint, eastern of double nebula", the other being NGC 7837. The position precesses to RA 00 06 53.7, Dec +08 21 46, about 0.7 arcmin north of the galaxy, and as for NGC 7837 the reference to the double nebula makes the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 11595 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 7838 is about 540 million light years away. However, for such distances it is necessary to take into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly half billion year journey. Doing so shows that the galaxy was about 520 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 530 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.3? arcmin, NGC 7838 is about 90 thousand light years across. The galaxy forms an interacting pair with NGC 7837 (which see for images), and as such is listed as Arp 246.

NGC 7839 (= PGC 539)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1886) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A 15th-magnitude star (or pair of stars) in Pegasus (RA 00 07 00.7, Dec +27 38 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7839 (Bigourdan (#102), 1860 RA 23 59 50, NPD 63 08.9) is "very faint, pretty small, diffuse, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 00 07 01.7, Dec +27 37 52, about 0.5 arcmin southeast of the pair of stars above (which are listed as NGC 7839 by Steinicke), and close enough to consider them a reasonable candidate for the NGC identification. Corwin states that the position precesses exactly to that of the brighter 15th-magnitude star which is the northeastern member of the pair, and considers the fainter star as a part of the NGC object only in that its light may have given Bigourdan the impression of a nebulous object. I don't know why Corwin's precessed position is different from that obtained with the NED precession calculator; however, he often refers to the original observations, and unless there are problems with the identification I rely on the values published by Dreyer, which often involve small round-off errors in the reduction to 1860 coordinates. Either way, there is general agreement that NGC 7839 is either the brighter star or the pair of stars, and not a nebula. Note: A Wikisky search for NGC 7839 shows a 14th-magnitude star 2 arcmin north of Dreyer's position; hence my use of the term "general" rather than "universal" agreement.
SDSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 7839, also showing NGC 1 and NGC 2
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7839, also showing NGC 1 and 2

NGC 7840 (= PGC 1345780)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pisces (RA 00 07 08.8, Dec +08 23 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 7840 (= GC 6245, Marth #600, 1860 RA 23 59 56, NPD 82 21) is "extremely faint, small". The position precesses to RA 00 07 06.7, Dec +08 25 46, nearly 3 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, and a much larger error than for any of the nearby galaxies Marth discovered on the same night (NGC 7834, 7835, 7837 and 7838); but there is no mention of any problem with its identification in any reference, and the observation cannot be a mistaken identification of one of his other discoveries; so although the unusually large positional error is puzzling, the identification seems reasonably certain.
Physical Information: The apparent size of NGC 7840 is 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin; nothing else is available.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 7840, also showing NGC 7835, NGC 7837, NGC 7838, NGC 3 and NGC 4Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 7840, also showing NGC 7835, 7837, 7838, 3 & 4
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 7840
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 7750 - 7799) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 7800 - 7840     → (IC 1 - 49)