Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated May 6, 2016
Checked Corwin positions, original NGC entries, updated formatting, basic pix/tags
WORKING: Checking against updated Steinicke historical/physical databases
Also need to check against all other historical/physical references

NGC 750 (= PGC 7369)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2? pec) in Triangulum (RA 01 57 32.7, Dec +33 12 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 750 (= GC 455 = JH 175 = WH II 222, 1860 RA 01 49 25, NPD 57 28.7) is "considerably bright, pretty large, round, a double nebula (with NGC 751), separation 25 arcsec at position angle 173°".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5170 km/sec, NGC 750 is about 240 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 170 to 180 million light years, but the same as the recessional velocity distance estimate for its companion, NGC 751. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.3 arcmins, NGC 750 is about 120 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxies NGC 750 and 751
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 750 and 751, enhanced to show their extensions
Below, a 5 by 8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies, enhanced to show their extensions
SDSS image of elliptical galaxies NGC 750 and 751, enhanced to show their extensions
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the central parts of the galaxies
SDSS image of elliptical galaxies NGC 750 and 751

NGC 751 (= PGC 7370)
Discovered (Oct 11, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0? pec) in Triangulum (RA 01 57 32.9, Dec +33 12 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 751 (= GC 5200, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 01 49 25, NPD 57 29.1) is "pretty faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle, a double nebula (with NGC 750), separation 25 arcsec at position angle 173°".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5150 km/sec, NGC 751 is about 240 million light years away, the same as the recessional velocity distance estimate for its companion, NGC 750 (which see for images). Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.4 arcmins, it is about 100 thousand light years across.

NGC 752 (= OCL 363)
Discovered (before 1654) by
Guillermo Hodierna
Discovered (Aug 24, 1783) by William Herschel
Also observed (September 29, 1783) by Caroline Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type III1m) in Andromeda (RA 01 57 33.0, Dec +37 50 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 752 (= GC 457 = JH 174 = VII 32, 1860 RA 01 49 26, NPD 53 01.2) is "a cluster, very very large, rich, stars large (bright) and scattered". (Note: See the discussion of Hodierna for an explanation of why he was not credited with the discovery of any NGC object.) The position precesses to RA 01 57 44.1, Dec +37 39 57, about 10 arcmin south of the center of the cluster, but well within its 75 arcmin diameter, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: Although not mentioned in the GC, nor therefore in the NGC, Caroline Herschel also observed the object, as shown above.
Physical Information: The cluster is about 1300 light years away, and given its apparent size, about 30 light years across.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 752
Above, a 75 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 752

NGC 753 (= PGC 7387)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Andromeda (RA 01 57 42.2, Dec +35 54 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 753 (= GC 5201, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 49 27, NPD 54 46.1) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.9 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 753
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 753
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 753

NGC 754 (= PGC 7068)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Eridanus (RA 01 54 20.8, Dec -56 45 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 754 (= GC 458 = JH 2450, 1860 RA 01 49 28, NPD 147 26.8) is "very faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 754, also showing NGC 745
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 754, also showing NGC 745
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 754

NGC 755 (=
NGC 763 = PGC 7262)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 755)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 755)
Also observed (date?) by Christian Peters (and later listed as NGC 755)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 763)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Cetus (RA 01 56 22.6, Dec -09 03 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 755 (= GC 441 = JH 177 = JH 2447 = WH III 265, Peters, 1860 RA 01 49 28, NPD 99 45.0) is "very faint, pretty small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 755
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 755
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 755

NGC 756 (= PGC 7078)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 01 54 29.0, Dec -16 42 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 756 (Leavenworth list I (#42), 1860 RA 01 49 30, NPD 107 24.9) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 01 47 45.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.45 by 0.3 arcmin (from images below). Vr 11985 z 0.039981
There is a 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin wide spiral apparent companion (type SABc?) at RA 01 54 29.7, Dec -16 42 33, but there appears to be nothing available in any reference, so whether it has any relationship to the larger galaxy is completely unknown
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 756
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 756
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and its apparent companion
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 756 and its apparent spiral companion

NGC 757 (=
NGC 731 = PGC 7118)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 731)
Also observed (date?) by Christian Peters (and later listed as NGC 731)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 757)
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Cetus (RA 01 54 56.2, Dec -09 00 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 757 (Ormond Stone list I (#43), 1860 RA 01 49 30, NPD 99 35.9) is "faint, small, gradually brighter middle and nucle, (= h 177?)", (JH) 177 being NGC 755; but although NGC 757 does appear to be a duplicate entry, it is thought to be a duplicate of NGC 731, not NGC 755.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 731 for anything else.

NGC 758 (= PGC 7198)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 01 55 42.1, Dec -03 03 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 758 (Leavenworth list II (#322), 1860 RA 01 49 30±, NPD 93 44.9) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 758
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 758
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 758

WORKING HERE: Need images

NGC 759 (= PGC 7397)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Andromeda (RA 01 57 50.3, Dec +36 20 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 759 (= GC 5202, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 49 34, NPD 54 20.6) is "a cluster, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy galaxy NGC 759
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 759
Below, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy galaxy NGC 759

NGC 760
Recorded (Dec 19, 1873) by
Ralph Copeland
A pair of stars in Triangulum (RA 01 57 47.4, Dec +33 21 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 760 (= GC 5203, Copeland using Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope, 1860 RA 01 49 38, NPD 57 19.9) is "very faint, round, 456 to northeast", (GC) 456 being NGC 761, which see for images.
Physical Information: RA 01 57 47.6, Dec +33 21 19.7 to east, RA 01 57 47.2, Dec +33 21 20 to west.

NGC 761 (= PGC 7395)
Discovered (Oct 11, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Triangulum (RA 01 57 49.6, Dec +33 22 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 761 (= GC 456, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 01 49 41, NPD 57 18.7) is "pretty faint, considerably large, 4 faint stars near".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 761, also showing the pair of stars listed as NGC 760
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 761, also showing NGC 760
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 761

NGC 762 (= PGC 7322)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Cetus (RA 01 56 57.8, Dec -05 24 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 762 (= GC 459 = JH 178 = JH 2451 = WH III 464, 1860 RA 01 49 57, NPD 96 05.3) is "very faint, small, a little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 762
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 762
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 762

NGC 763 (=
NGC 755 = PGC 7262)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 755)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 755)
Also observed (date?) by Christian Peters (and later listed as NGC 755)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 763)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Cetus (RA 01 56 22.6, Dec -09 03 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 763 (Ormond Stone list I (#44), 1860 RA 01 50 30, NPD 99 39.9) is "very faint, pretty large, extended 65°, gradually brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 755 for anything else.

WORKING: Check identification

NGC 764
Recorded (Jan 6, 1886) by
Ormond Stone
A pair of stars in Cetus (RA 01 57 03.2, Dec -16 03 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 764 (Ormond Stone list I (#45), 1860 RA 01 50 30, NPD 106 42.9) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle". (identification apparently uncertain)
Physical Information: nw star RA 01 57 02.9, Dec -16 03 38, se star RA 01 57 03.5, Dec -16 03 52
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as NGC 764
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the pair of stars listed as NGC 764

NGC 765 (= PGC 7475)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Aries (RA 01 58 48.0, Dec +24 53 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 765 (= GC 5204, Marth #52, 1860 RA 01 50 57, NPD 65 47.0) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of central galaxy 2.8 by 2.8 arcmin(?), but extended arms sprawl across a 4.5 by 4 arcmin(?) field.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 765
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 765
Below, a 5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, enhanced to show its extended arms
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 765, digitally enhanced to show off its extended arms

NGC 766 (= PGC 7468)
Discovered (Jan 8, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Pisces (RA 01 58 42.0, Dec +08 20 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 766 (= GC 460 = JH 180, 1860 RA 01 51 19, NPD 82 20.2) is "very faint, small, round, 11th magnitude star 2 arcmin distant at position angle 75°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 2.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 766
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 766
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 766

NGC 767 (= PGC 7483)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Cetus (RA 01 58 50.8, Dec -09 35 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 767 (Leavenworth list II (#323), 1860 RA 01 51 20, NPD 100 14.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 160°".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5390 km/sec, NGC 767 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin(?), it is about 90 thousand light years across. Based on their appearance, it is probably interacting with PGC 989194.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 767 and its probable companion, PGC 989194
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 767, also showing PGC 989194
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 767 and its probable companion, PGC 989194

PGC 989194
Not an NGC object but listed here due to its apparent interaction with
NGC 767
A 17th-magnitude galaxy (type S? pec) in Cetus (RA 01 58 49.9, Dec -09 34 51)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.15 arcmin? Nothing else seems to be available, so whether it is actually interacting with NGC 767 or merely an optical double is unknown; but the distorted appearance of the two galaxies suggests that they are interacting, in which case they would be at the same distance (of about 250 million light years), and its apparent size would correspond to 30 thousand light years.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 989194, also showing part of NGC 767
Above, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 989194
Also shown is part of NGC 767 (which see for other images)

NGC 768 (= PGC 7465)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc? pec) in Cetus (RA 01 58 40.9, Dec +00 31 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 768 (Swift list III (#8), 1860 RA 01 51 29, NPD 90 08.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, 8th magnitude star 30 seconds of time to east".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7020 km/sec, NGC 768 is about 325 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 255 to 310 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.2 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 210 thousand light years across. The galaxy has a 'tail' at its southern end, and is distorted and filled with star-forming regions in the vicinity of SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6, the dwarf galaxy to the west of its nucleus, which appears to be colliding with the larger galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 768, also showing IC 1761
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 768, also showing IC 1761
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 768 and its probable companion, SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6

SDSS J015840.06+003148.4
Not an NGC object but listed here since apparently interacting with
NGC 768
A 19th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Cetus (RA 01 58 40.1 +00 31 46)
Physical Information: Apparently colliding with NGC 768 (which see for more images), and if so at the same distance (of about 325 million light years), in which case its apparent size of 0.08 by 0.07 arcmin would correspond to about 8 thousand light years.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 768 and its probable companion, SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6
Above, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6 and NGC 768 (which see)

NGC 769 (= PGC 7537)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1866) by
Truman Safford
Discovered (Nov 5, 1882) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Triangulum (RA 01 59 35.9, Dec +30 54 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 769 (Stephan list XII (#??), (Safford 68), 1860 RA 01 51 32, NPD 59 46.4) is "very faint, very small, irregularly round, brighter middle, faint star attached".
Discovery Notes: Although Safford observed this object in 1866, none of his discoveries were published until 1887 (see more about that at his biographical entry), so neither Stephan nor Dreyer were aware of them at the time the NGC was under preparation. Some of them were included in an Appendix to the NGC, but it was impractical to correct the individual entries.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 769
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 769
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 769

NGC 770 (= PGC 7517, and with
NGC 772 = Arp 78)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1855) by R. J. Mitchell
Discovered (Nov 24, 1861) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Aries (RA 01 59 13.6, Dec +18 57 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 770 (= GC 461 = GC 464, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 51 33, NPD 71 43.7) is "very faint, small, round, southwest of I 112", (WH) I 112 being NGC 772.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2460 km/sec, NGC 770 is about 115 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 105 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy (NGC 772) with a small high surface brightness companion (NGC 770).
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 770, part of Arp 78
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 770; for wider-field views see NGC 772

NGC 771 (= 50 Cassiopeiae)
Recorded (Oct 29, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 4th-magnitude star in Cassiopeia (RA 02 03 26.1, Dec +72 25 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 771 (= GC 462 = JH 179, 1860 RA 01 51 36, NPD 18 15.6) is a "suspected nebulous star (50 Cassiopeiae)". As it turns out the star has no nebulosity, but the suspicion that it might led to the NGC entry.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near 50 Cassiopeiae, also known as NGC 771
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on 50 Cassiopeiae (NGC 771)

NGC 772 (= PGC 7525, and with
NGC 770 = Arp 78)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 18, 1830) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)b?) in Aries (RA 01 59 19.5, Dec +19 00 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 772 (= GC 463 = JH 181 = WH I 112, 1860 RA 01 51 39, NPD 71 40.6) is "bright, considerably large, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2472 km/sec, NGC 772 is about 115 million light years away, well within widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of 60 to 170 million light years. In any event, it must be at about the same distance as its elliptical companion, NGC 770 (that is, about 115 million light years away). Given that and its apparent size of 7.2 by 4.3 arcmin, it is about 240 thousand light years across. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a spiral galaxy (NGC 772) with a small high surface brightness companion (NGC 770).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 772 and elliptical galaxy 770, collectively known as Arp 78
Above, a 16 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 772 shows clouds surrounding it and NGC 770
Below, a 7.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 772, enhanced to show its outer arm, also showing NGC 770
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 772 and elliptical galaxy 770, collectively known as Arp 78, digitally enhanced to show fainter features
Below, a similar view without the enhancement (Image Credit Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 772 and NGC 770, collectively known as Arp 78, overlaid on an SDSS background to fill in missing areas

NGC 773 (= PGC 7486)
Discovered (Nov 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Cetus (RA 01 58 52.0, Dec -11 30 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 773 (= GC 465 = JH 2452 = WH III 468, 1860 RA 01 52 01, NPD 102 10.8) is "considerably faint, pretty large, extended 0°, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 773
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 773
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 773

NGC 774 (= PGC 7536)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0(r)a?) in Aries (RA 01 59 34.7, Dec +14 00 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 774 (= GC 466 = WH III 214, 1860 RA 01 52 02, NPD 76 41.3) is "very faint, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 774
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 774
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 774

NGC 775 (= PGC 7451)
Discovered (Nov 14, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Fornax (RA 01 58 32.7, Dec -26 17 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 775 (= GC 467 = JH 2453, 1860 RA 01 52 04, NPD 116 58.5) is "pretty faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 775
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 775
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 775

NGC 776 (= PGC 7560)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Aries (RA 01 59 54.5, Dec +23 38 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 776 (= GC 468, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 52 05, NPD 67 02.3) is "faint, pretty large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 776, also showing IC 180 and IC 181
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 776, also showing IC 180 and 181
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 776

NGC 777 (= PGC 7584)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Triangulum (RA 02 00 14.9, Dec +31 25 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 777 (= GC 469 = JH 182 = WH II 223, 1860 RA 01 52 10, NPD 59 15.0) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 2.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 777
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 777
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 777

NGC 778 (= PGC 7597)
Discovered (Nov 5, 1866) by
Truman Safford
Discovered (Nov 17, 1876) by Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)a?) in Triangulum (RA 02 00 19.4, Dec +31 18 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 778 (= GC 5205, Stephan list VIII (#??), (Safford 64), 1860 RA 01 52 15, NPD 59 22.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Although Safford observed this object in 1866, none of his discoveries were published until 1887 (see more about that at his biographical entry), so neither Stephan nor Dreyer were aware of them at the time the NGC was under preparation. Some of them were included in an Appendix to the NGC, but it was impractical to correct the individual entries.
Physical Information: A Seyfert or starburst galaxy?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 778
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 778
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 778

NGC 779 (= PGC 7544)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Cetus (RA 01 59 42.6, Dec -05 57 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 779 (= GC 470 = JH 183 = WH I 101, 1860 RA 01 52 42, NPD 96 38.7) is "considerably bright, large, much extended 162°, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.1 by 1.2 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(rs)b.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 779
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 779
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 779

NGC 780 (= PGC 7616)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Triangulum (RA 02 00 35.2, Dec +28 13 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 780 (= GC 472 = JH 184 = WH III 583, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 52 38, NPD 62 27.7) is "very faint, very small, extended, 3 stars to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8 arcmin, counting the distorted regions angled away from the plane of the galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 780
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 780
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 780

NGC 781 (= PGC 7577)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Aries (RA 02 00 09.0, Dec +12 39 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 781 (= GC 471 = WH III 215, 1860 RA 01 52 43, NPD 78 00.0) is "extremely faint, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 781
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 781
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 781

NGC 782 (= PGC 7379)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Eridanus (RA 01 57 40.4, Dec -57 47 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 782 (= GC 473 = JH 2454, 1860 RA 01 52 57, NPD 148 28.1) is "pretty bright, pretty large, a little extended, 12th magnitude star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.2 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 782
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 782
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 782

NGC 783 (=
IC 1765 = PGC 7657)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1871) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 783)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1765)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Triangulum (RA 02 01 06.6, Dec +31 52 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 783 (= GC 5206, Stephan list VIII (#8), 1860 RA 01 53 00, NPD 58 47.8) is "extremely faint, small, irregularly round, very faint star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 783
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 783
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 783

NGC 784 (= PGC 7671)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Triangulum (RA 02 01 17.0, Dec +28 50 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 784 (= GC 5207, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 53 19, NPD 61 50.0) is "very faint, large, extended (double?)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.6 by 1.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 784
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 784
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 784
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 784

NGC 785 (=
IC 1766 = PGC 7694)
Discovered (Oct 25, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 785)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1766)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(r)a?) in Triangulum (RA 02 01 40.0, Dec +31 49 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 785 (= GC 5208, Stephan list VIII (#9), 1860 RA 01 53 34, NPD 58 51.1) is "extremely faint, extremely small, very faint star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.75 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 785
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 785
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 785

NGC 786 (= PC 7680)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S(rs)cd?) in Aries (RA 02 01 24.7, Dec +15 38 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 786 (= GC 5209, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 53 47, NPD 75 02.8) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.65 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 786
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 786
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 786

NGC 787 (= PGC 7632)
Discovered (Feb 27, 1865) by
Christian Peters
Discovered (Nov 9, 1879) by Wilhelm Tempel
Discovered (1885?) by Ormond Stone
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)S(r)b?) in Cetus (RA 02 00 48.6, Dec -09 00 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 787 (Peters, Tempel list IV (#??), 1860 RA 01 53 54, NPD 99 41.0) is "very faint, small".
Discovery Notes: The reference for Stone's observation is by Steinicke.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 787
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 787
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 787

NGC 788 (= PGC 7656)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(r)a?) in Cetus (RA 02 01 06.4, Dec -06 48 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 788 (= GC 474 = JH 185 = WH II 435, 1860 RA 01 54 08, NPD 97 29.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin for the brighter central area, about 4.0 by 2.9 for the faintest outer regions (based on images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 788
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 788
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 788

NGC 789 (= PGC 7760)
Discovered (Aug 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Discovered (Dec 10, 1871) by Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd??) in Triangulum (RA 02 02 26.0, Dec +32 04 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 789 (= GC 5210, d'Arrest, Stephan list III (#??), 1860 RA 01 54 19, NPD 58 36.4) is "very faint, small, irregularly extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.65 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 789
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 789
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 789

NGC 790 (= PGC 7677)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cetus (RA 02 01 21.6, Dec -05 22 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 790 (= GC 475 = JH 186 = WH III 433, 1860 RA 01 54 21, NPD 96 03.2) is "considerably faint, considerably small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 790
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 790
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 790

NGC 791 (= PGC 7702)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Pisces (RA 02 01 44.2, Dec +08 30 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 791 (= GC 476, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 01 54 23, NPD 82 10.7) is "very faint, small, 14th magnitude star 3 arcmin to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 791
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 791
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 791

NGC 792 (= PGC 7744)
Discovered (Sep 7, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(rs)a?) in Aries (RA 02 02 15.3, Dec +15 42 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 792 (= GC 477 = JH 187, 1860 RA 01 54 39, NPD 74 58.2) is "extremely faint, small, round, 11th magnitude star at position angle 75°".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 792
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 792
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 792

NGC 793
Recorded (1886) by
Gerhard Lohse
A pair of stars in Triangulum (RA 02 02 54.5, Dec +31 58 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 793 (J. G. Lohse, 1860 RA 01 54 40±, NPD 58 40±) is "very very faint, between 2 stars, southeast of 5210", (GC) 5210 being NGC 789. Identification uncertain
Physical Information: ne * RA 02 02 54.7, Dec +31 58 57, sw * RA 02 02 54.4, Dec +31 58 46
SDSS image of region near the pair of stars tentatively listed as NGC 793, also showing parts of NGC 789 and NGC 798
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the pair of stars listed as NGC 793 (left of their label)
Also shown are parts of NGC 789 and 798

NGC 794 (=
IC 191 = PGC 7763)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 794)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 794)
"Discovered" (Oct 20, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 191)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aries (RA 02 02 29.3, Dec +18 22 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 794 (= GC 478 = JH 188 = WH III 207, 1860 RA 01 54 55, NPD 72 18.1) is "very faint, considerably small, stellar". (See IC 191 for a discussion of the double listing.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8225 km/sec, NGC 794 is about 385 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.25 arcmin, it is about 190 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 794
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 794
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 794

NGC 795 (= PGC 7552)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 01 59 49.3, Dec -55 49 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 795 (= GC 479 = JH 2455, 1860 RA 01 54 55, NPD 146 30.4) is "pretty faint, small, round, 2 stars of 11th magnitude near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 0.6 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 795
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 795
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 795

NGC 796 (= "PGC 3517874", an OCL "in" the Small Magellanic Cloud
Discovered (Sep 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Hydrus (RA 01 56 44.3, Dec -74 13 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 796 (= GC 480 = JH 2456, 1860 RA 01 55 01, NPD 164 54.3) is "extremely faint, very small, round, star 25 arcsec to northwest". Listed in LEDA as PGC 3517874, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size about 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin for core, perhaps 1.0 by 0.85 arcmin for outer fringes (from images below). Although "in" the Small Magellanic Cloud, NGC 796 is one of the outermost clusters "in" that galaxy, lying about 5 degrees east of its center, which corresponds to about 17500 light years, or nearly four times as far from the galaxy as the galaxy's apparent radius.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 796
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 796
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 796
Below, a 10 degree wide DSS image showing the cluster's position relative to the SMC
(On this scale the cluster is far too small to see, so the tiny box below its label shows its position)DSS image showing the position of NGC 796 relative to the Small Magellanic Cloud

NGC 797 (= PGC 7832)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Andromeda (RA 02 03 27.9, Dec +38 07 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 797 (= GC 481 = JH 189 = WH III 566, 1860 RA 01 55 09, NPD 52 33.9) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, suddenly brighter middle, star near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 797
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 795
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 797

NGC 798 (= PGC 7823)
Discovered (Dec 10, 1871) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Triangulum (RA 02 03 19.6, Dec +32 04 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 798 (= GC 5211, Stephan list III (#4), 1860 RA 01 55 12, NPD 58 36.0) is "extremely faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.45 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 798
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 798
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 798

NGC 799 = (PGC 7741)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)a?) in Cetus (RA 02 02 12.3, Dec -00 06 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 799 (Swift list II (#16), 1860 RA 01 55 33, NPD 90 46.0) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, northern of 2", the other being NGC 800. The second Index Catalog lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Howe) of 01 55 03 and adds "nucleus 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Paired with NGC 800. Based on a recessional velocity of 5915 km/sec, NGC 799 is about 275 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.65 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(l)a.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 799, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 800
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 799, also showing NGC 800
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 799
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 700 - 749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 750 - 799     → (NGC 800 - 849)