Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Aug 12, 2012
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NGC 750 (= PGC 7369)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2 pec) in Triangulum (RA 01 57 32.6, Dec +33 12 35)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5170 km/sec, NGC 750 is about 240 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 170 to 180 million light years, but the same as the recessional velocity distance estimate for its companion, NGC 751. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.3 arcmins, NGC 750 is about 120 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxies NGC 750 and 751
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 750 and 751
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, enhanced to show their extensions
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxies NGC 750 and 751

NGC 751 (= PGC 7370)
Discovered (Oct 11, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0 pec) in Triangulum (RA 01 57 33.1, Dec +33 12 09)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5150 km/sec, NGC 751 is about 240 million light years away, the same as the recessional velocity distance estimate for its companion, NGC 750 (which see for images). Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 1.4 arcmins, it is about 100 thousand light years across.

NGC 752 (= OCL 363)
Discovered (before 1654) by
Guillermo Hodierna
Discovered (September 29, 1783?) by Caroline Herschel
A 6th-magnitude open cluster (type III1m) in Andromeda (RA 01 57 35.0, Dec +37 50 00)
Per Dreyer, NGC 752 (= John Herschel's GC 457, 1860 RA 01 49 26, NPD 53 01.2) is "cluster, very very large, rich, stars large and scattered". (Note: See the discussion of Hodierna for an explanation of why he was not credited with the discovery of any NGC object.) The position precesses to RA 01 57 44.1, Dec +37 39 57, about 10 arcmin south of the center of the cluster, but well within its 75 arcmin diameter, so the identification is certain. The cluster is about 1300 light years away, and given its apparent size, about 30 light years across.
DSS image of open cluster NGC 752
Above, a 75 arcmin wide view of NGC 752

NGC 753 (= PGC 7387)
Discovered (Sep 16, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Andromeda (RA 01 57 42.4, Dec +35 54 57)
Apparent size 3.0 by 1.9 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 753
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 753
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 753

NGC 754 (= PGC 7068)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Eridanus (RA 01 54 20.8, Dec -56 45 40)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 755 (=
NGC 763 = PGC 7262)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 755)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 763)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Cetus (RA 01 56 22.6, Dec -09 03 45)
Apparent size 3.3 by 1.1 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 755
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 755
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 755

NGC 756 (= PGC 7078)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth (I-42)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Cetus (RA 01 54 29.0, Dec -16 42 27)
The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 01 47 45. Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 757 (=
NGC 731 = PGC 7118)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 731)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (I-43) (and later listed as NGC 757)
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Cetus (RA 01 54 55.9, Dec -09 00 41)
(this entry will contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 731

NGC 758 (= PGC 7198)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (II-322)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Cetus (RA 01 55 42.1, Dec -03 03 58)
Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 759 (= PGC 7397)
Discovered (Sep 17, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Andromeda (RA 01 57 50.3, Dec +36 20 35)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.4 arcmin.

NGC 760
Recorded (Dec 19, 1873) by
Ralph Copeland
A pair of stars in Triangulum (RA 01 57 47.3, Dec +33 21 19)

NGC 761 (= PGC 7395)
Discovered (Oct 11, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Triangulum (RA 01 57 49.6, Dec +33 22 35)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 761
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 761
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 761

NGC 762 (= PGC 7322)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Cetus (RA 01 56 57.9, Dec -05 24 08)
Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 762
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 762
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 762

NGC 763 (=
NGC 755 = PGC 7262)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 755)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (I-44) (and later listed as NGC 763)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Cetus (RA 01 56 22.6, Dec -09 03 45)
(this entry will contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 755)

NGC 764
Recorded (Jan 6, 1886) by
Ormond Stone (I-45)
A pair of stars in Cetus (RA 01 57 03.3, Dec -16 03 41)

NGC 765 (= PGC 7475)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1864) by
Albert Marth (52)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc) in Aries (RA 01 58 48.1, Dec +24 53 32)
Apparent size of central galaxy 2.8 by 2.8 arcmin, but extended arms sprawl across a 4.5 by 4 arcmin field.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 765, digitally enhanced to show off its extended arms
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 765, enhanced to show off its extended arms
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 765

NGC 766 (= PGC 7468)
Discovered (Jan 8, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Pisces (RA 01 58 42.0, Dec +08 20 50)
Apparent size 2.0 by 2.0 arcmin.

NGC 767 (= PGC 7483)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth (II-323)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb pec?) in Cetus (RA 01 58 50.8, Dec -09 35 14)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5390 km/sec, NGC 767 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across. Based on their appearance, it is probably interacting with PGC 989194.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 767 and its probable companion, PGC 989194
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 767 and PGC 989194
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 767 and its probable companion, PGC 989194

PGC 989194
Not an NGC object but listed here due to its proximity to
NGC 767
A 17th-magnitude galaxy (type S pec?) in Cetus (RA 01 58 49.9, Dec -09 34 51)
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.15 arcmin. Nothing else seems to be available, so whether it is interacting with NGC 767 (which see for images) or merely an optical double is unknown; but the distorted appearance of the two galaxies suggests that they are interacting, in which case they would be at the same distance (of about 250 million light years), and its apparent size would correspond to 30 thousand light years.

NGC 768 (= PGC 7465)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (3-8)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(r)bc pec?) in Cetus (RA 01 58 40.8, Dec +00 31 44)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7020 km/sec, NGC 768 is about 325 million light years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 255 to 310 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.2 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 210 thousand light years across. The galaxy has a 'tail' at its southern end, and is distorted and filled with star-forming regions in the vicinity of SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6, the dwarf galaxy to the west of its nucleus, which appears to be colliding with the larger galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 768 and its probable companion, SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 768 and its probable companion, SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 1761
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 768, also showing lenticular galaxy IC 1761

SDSS J015840.06+003148.4
Not an NGC object but listed here because an apparent companion of
NGC 768
A 19th-magnitude compact galaxy (type C?) in Cetus (RA 01 58 40.1 +00 31 46)
Apparently colliding with NGC 768 (which see for more images), and if so at the same distance (of about 325 million light years), in which case its apparent size of 0.08 by 0.07 arcmin would correspond to about 8 thousand light years.
SDSS closeup of spiral galaxy NGC 768 and its probable companion, SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6
Above, a 1 arcmin wide closeup of SDSSJ015840.07+003148.6 and NGC 768 (which see)

NGC 769 (= PGC 7537)
Discovered (Nov 9, 1866) by
Truman Safford (Safford 68)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Triangulum (RA 01 59 35.8, Dec +30 54 35)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 769
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 769
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 769

NGC 770 (= PGC 7517, and with
NGC 772 = Arp 78)
Discovered (Nov 3, 1855) by R. J. Mitchell
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Aries (RA 01 59 13.5, Dec +18 57 18)
Based on a recessional velocity of 2460 km/sec, NGC 770 is about 115 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 105 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 770, the smaller component of Arp 78
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 770; for wider-field views see NGC 772

NGC 771 = 50 Cassiopeia
Recorded (Oct 29, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 4th-magnitude star in Cassiopeia (RA 02 03 26.0, Dec +72 25 19)

NGC 772 (= PGC 7525, and with
NGC 770 = Arp 78)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1785) by William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)b) in Aries (RA 01 59 19.5, Dec +19 00 27)
Based on a recessional velocity of 2472 km/sec, NGC 772 is about 115 million light years away, well within widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of 60 to 170 million light years. In any event, it must be at about the same distance as its elliptical companion, NGC 770 (that is, about 115 million light years away). Given that and its apparent size of 7.2 by 4.3 arcmin, it is about 240 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 772 and elliptical galaxy 770, collectively known as Arp 78, digitally enhanced to show fainter features
Above, a 7.2 arcmin wide view of NGC 772, enhanced to show its outer arm; also shown is NGC 770
Below, a similar view without the enhancement (Image Credits: Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 772 and elliptical galaxy 770, collectively known as Arp 78, overlaid on an SDSS background to fill in missing areas
Below, a 16 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy shows clouds surrounding it and its satellite
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 772 and elliptical galaxy 770, collectively known as Arp 78

NGC 773 (= PGC 7486)
Discovered (Nov 27, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa) in Cetus (RA 01 58 51.9, Dec -11 30 55)
Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 773
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 773
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 773

NGC 774 (= PGC 7536)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Aries (RA 01 59 34.7, Dec +14 00 30)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.2 arcmin.

NGC 775 (= PGC 7451)
Discovered (Nov 14, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Fornax (RA 01 58 32.5, Dec -26 17 38)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 775
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 775
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 775

NGC 776 (= PGC 7560)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Aries (RA 01 59 54.6, Dec +23 38 39)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 776
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 776
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing IC 180 and 181
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 776, also showing spiral galaxy IC 180 and compact galaxy IC 181

NGC 777 (= PGC 7584)
Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Triangulum (RA 02 00 14.8, Dec +31 25 47)
Apparent size 2.5 by 2.0 arcmin.

NGC 778 (= PGC 7597)
Discovered (Nov 5, 1866) by
Truman Safford (Safford 64)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Triangulum (RA 02 00 19.4, Dec +31 18 47)

NGC 779 (= PGC 7544)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
An 11th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Cetus (RA 01 59 42.6, Dec -05 57 51)
Apparent size 4.1 by 1.2 arcmin. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(rs)b.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 779
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 779
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 779

NGC 780 (= PGC 7616)
Discovered (Oct 26, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab pec?) in Triangulum (RA 02 00 35.1, Dec +28 13 33)
Apparent size 1.6 by 0.8 arcmin, counting the distorted regions angled away from the plane of the galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 780
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 780
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 780

NGC 781 (= PGC 7577)
Discovered (Oct 16, 1784) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Aries (RA 02 00 08.8, Dec +12 39 20)
Apparent size 1.5 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 781
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 781
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 781

NGC 782 (= PGC 7379)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBb) in Eridanus (RA 01 57 40.1, Dec -57 47 27)
Apparent size 2.4 by 1.2 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 782
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 782
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 782

NGC 783 (=
IC 1765 = PGC 7657)
Discovered (Sep 22, 1871) by Édouard Stephan (8-8) (and later listed as NGC 783)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1765)
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Triangulum (RA 02 01 06.6, Dec +31 52 55)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 783
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 783
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 783

NGC 784 (= PGC 7671)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd) in Triangulum (RA 02 01 17.1, Dec +28 50 17)
Apparent size 6.6 by 1.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 784
Above, a 6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 784
Below, a detailed view of part of the galaxy (Image Credits: Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikisky cutout tool)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 784
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 784

NGC 785 (=
IC 1766 = PGC 7694)
Discovered (Oct 25, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (8-9) (and later listed as NGC 785)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1766)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Triangulum (RA 02 01 40.0, Dec +31 49 36)
Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 786 (= PC 7680)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Aries (RA 02 01 24.6, Dec +15 38 46)
Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 786
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 786
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 786

NGC 787 (= PGC 7632)
Discovered (Feb 27, 1865) by
Christian Peters
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb) in Cetus (RA 02 00 48.6, Dec -09 00 09)
Apparent size 2.5 by 1.9 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 787
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 787
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 787

NGC 788 (= PGC 7656)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Cetus (RA 02 01 06.4, Dec -06 48 56)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin.

NGC 789 (= PGC 7760)
Discovered (Aug 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd) in Triangulum (RA 02 02 26.0, Dec +32 04 20)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 789
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 789
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 789

NGC 790 (= PGC 7677)
Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Cetus (RA 02 01 21.6, Dec -05 22 14)
Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin.

NGC 791 (= PGC 7702)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Pisces (RA 02 01 44.2, Dec +08 29 59)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.6 arcmin.

NGC 792 (= PGC 7744)
Discovered (Sep 7, 1828) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Aries (RA 02 02 15.3, Dec +15 42 44)
Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1 arcmin.

NGC 793
Recorded (1886) by
Gerhard Lohse
A pair of stars in Triangulum (RA 02 02 54.5, Dec +31 58 53)

NGC 794 (=
IC 191 = PGC 7763)
Discovered (Oct 15, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 794)
"Discovered" (Oct 20, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later recorded as IC 191)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Aries (RA 02 02 29.4, Dec +18 22 22)
(See IC 191 for a discussion of the double listing.) Based on a recessional velocity of 8225 km/sec, NGC 794 is about 385 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.25 arcmin, it is about 190 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 794
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 794
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 794

NGC 795 (= PGC 7552)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1834) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Eridanus (RA 01 59 49.3, Dec -55 49 28)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin.

NGC 796
Discovered (Sep 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Hydrus (RA 01 56 43.8, Dec -74 13 12)
Apparent size 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 797 (= PGC 7832)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa) in Andromeda (RA 02 03 27.9, Dec +38 07 03)
Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 797
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 797
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 797

NGC 798 (= PGC 7823)
Discovered (Dec 10, 1871) by
Édouard Stephan (3-4)
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E6) in Triangulum (RA 02 03 19.6, Dec +32 04 39)
Apparent size 1.2 by 0.5 arcmin.

NGC 799 = (PGC 7741)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (2-16)
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)a) in Cetus (RA 02 02 12.2, Dec -00 06 01)
The second Index Catalog lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Howe) of 01 55 03 and adds "nucleus 13th magnitude". Paired with NGC 800. Based on a recessional velocity of 5915 km/sec, NGC 799 is about 275 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.65 by 1.3 arcmin, it is about 130 thousand light years across. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(l)a.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 799
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 799
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 800
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 799, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 800
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 700 - 749) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 750 - 799     → (NGC 800 - 849)