Celestial Atlas
(NGC 850 - 899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 900 - 949 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → (NGC 950 - 999)
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Page last updated May 18, 2016
Checked Corwin positions, original NGC entries, updating formatting, adding basic pix/etc
Next: Check updated Steinicke databases

NGC 900 (= PGC 9079)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Aries (RA 02 23 32.2, Dec +26 30 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 900 (= GC 5231, Marth #57, 1860 RA 02 15 30, NPD 64 08) is "very faint, very small, stellar". The position precesses to RA 02 23 32.9, Dec +26 30 22, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain. (Despite that, database errors have sometimes resulted in the galaxy's being called NGC 901.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin, including its faint outer extensions (from the images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 900, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown is NGC 901
Above, a SDSS image laid over a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 900, also showing NGC 901
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 900

NGC 901 (= PGC 212967)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Aries (RA 02 23 34.1, Dec +26 33 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 901 (= GC 5232, Marth #58, 1860 RA 02 15 33, NPD 64 05) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 02 23 36.0, Dec +26 33 22, only 2s east of the center of the galaxy, and in exactly the right position relative to NGC 900, which was found by Marth on the same night, so the identification is certain. (Despite that, database errors have sometimes resulted in the object being called NGC 900, or even "lost".)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin (from images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 901, also showing NGC 900
Above, a SDSS image laid over a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 901, also showing NGC 901
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 901

NGC 902 (= PGC 9021)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Cetus (RA 02 22 21.8, Dec -16 40 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 902 (Leavenworth list I (#60), 1860 RA 02 15 35, NPD 107 20.3) is "extremely faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.45 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 902
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 902
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 902

NGC 903 (= PGC 9097)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aries (RA 02 24 00.9, Dec +27 21 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 903 (Stephan list XIII (#17), 1860 RA 02 15 57, NPD 63 16.9) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin??
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 903
Above, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 903; for a wider view see NGC 904

NGC 904 (= PGC 9112)
Discovered (Dec 13, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec) in Aries (RA 02 24 05.6, Dec +27 20 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 904 (Stephan list XIII (#18), 1860 RA 02 16 01, NPD 63 17.7) is "very faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9?? arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 904, also showing NGC 903
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 904, also showing NGC 903
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 904, also showing NGC 903

NGC 905 (= PGC 9038)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Sherburne Burnham
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(s)b?) in Cetus (RA 02 22 43.6, Dec -08 43 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 905 (Leavenworth list II (#334), 1860 RA 02 16 26, NPD 99 22.2) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, perhaps a star". The first Index Catalog adds "An extremely faint patch of nebulosity seen by Burnham in or near the place".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 905
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 905
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 905

NGC 906 (= PGC 9188)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Andromeda (RA 02 25 16.3, Dec +42 05 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 906 (Stephan list X (#5), 1860 RA 02 16 30, NPD 48 33.8) is "extremely faint, irregularly extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 906, also showing NGC 909
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 906, also showing NGC 909
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 906

NGC 907 (= PGC 9054)
Discovered (Oct 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBd?) in Cetus (RA 02 23 01.9, Dec -20 42 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 907 (= GC 535 = JH 2477 = WH III 224, 1860 RA 02 16 34, NPD 111 20.6) is "faint, small, extended 90°, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.6 arcmin? Part of an interacting triplet with IC 223 and NGC 899.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 907
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 907
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 907
Below, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image showing NGC 899 and 907, and IC 223
DSS image of the interacting triplet consisting of NGC 899, NGC 907 and IC 223

NGC 908 (= PGC 9057)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1786) by
William Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Cetus (RA 02 23 04.5, Dec -21 14 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 908 (= GC 536 = WH I 153, 1860 RA 02 16 37, NPD 111 52.3) is "considerably bright, very large, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.1 by 2.7 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SA(s)c.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 908, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a NOAO image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 908
(Image Credit above and below George and Laura Mishler/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 6 arcmin wide NOAO image of the galaxy
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 908

NGC 909 (= PGC 9197)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Andromeda (RA 02 25 22.8, Dec +42 02 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 909 (Stephan list X (#6), 1860 RA 02 16 37, NPD 48 37.1) is "very faint, very small, very small (faint) star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin??
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 909, also showing NGC 906 and NGC 911
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 909, also showing NGC 906 and 911
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 909

NGC 910 (= PGC 9201)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3-4??) in Andromeda (RA 02 25 26.8, Dec +41 49 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 910 (= GC 537 = WH III 571, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 02 16 46, NPD 48 49.5) is "very faint, pretty small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4 by 2.5 arcmin??
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 910, also showing NGC 912 and NGC 913
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 910, also showing NGC 912 and 913
Below, a 4.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 910

NGC 911 (= PGC 9221)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Andromeda (RA 02 25 42.4, Dec +41 57 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 911 (Stephan list X (#7), 1860 RA 02 16 56, NPD 48 41.8) is "extremely faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 911, also showing NGC 909
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 911, also showing NGC 909
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 911

NGC 912 (= PGC 9222)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Andromeda (RA 02 25 42.8, Dec +41 46 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 912 (Stephan list X (#8), 1860 RA 02 16 57, NPD 48 52.5) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 912, also showing NGC 910 and NGC 913
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 912, also showing NGC 910 and 913
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 912

NGC 913 (= PGC 9230)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Andromeda (RA 02 25 44.6, Dec +41 47 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 913 (Stephan list X (#9), 1860 RA 02 16 59, NPD 48 51.2) is "extremely faint, very small, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2? arcmin.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 913
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 913; for a wider-field image, see NGC 912

NGC 914 (= PGC 9253)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Andromeda (RA 02 26 05.2, Dec +42 08 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 914 (Stephan list X (#10), 1860 RA 02 17 19, NPD 48 30.5) is "extremely faint, pretty large, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1? arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 914
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 914
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 914

NGC 915 (= PGC 9232)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aries (RA 02 25 45.6, Dec +27 13 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 915 (= GC 5233, Marth #59, 1860 RA 02 17 41, NPD 63 26) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin??
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 915
Above, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 915; for a wider-field image see NGC 916

NGC 916 (= PGC 9245)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec?) in Aries (RA 02 25 47.6, Dec +27 14 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 916 (= GC 5234, Marth #60, 1860 RA 02 17 43, NPD 63 25) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin??
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 916, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas; also shown is NGC 915
Above, a SDSS image laid over a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 916, also showing NGC 915
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 916

NGC 917 (= PGC 9258)
Discovered (Nov 22, 1827) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Triangulum (RA 02 26 07.7, Dec +31 54 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 917 (= GC 539 = JH 220, 1860 RA 02 17 51, NPD 58 23.6) is "very faint, small, round, 4 stars near (perhaps a very small cluster?)". The position precesses to RA 02 26 09.0, Dec +32 14 29, but there is nothing there. However (per Corwin), Herschel's original note states that the nebula forms a semicircle with the four stars, and the galaxy listed above, though 20 arcmin due south of the NGC position, is more or less in a semicircle with four nearby stars, so despite an unusually large error in the declination, the identification seems reasonably certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.3 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 917
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 917
Below, a SDSS image of the galaxy overlaid on a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 917, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in minor missing areas

NGC 918 (= PGC 9236)
Discovered (Jan 11, 1831) by
John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Aries (RA 02 25 50.8, Dec +18 29 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 918 (= GC 538 = JH 221, 1860 RA 02 18 07, NPD 72 08.1) is "pretty faint, large, round, 10th magnitude star 3 arcmin to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 2.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 918, also showing obscuring clouds of dust in our galaxy
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 918, showing clouds of dust in our own galaxy
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 918

NGC 919 (= PGC 9267)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Aries (RA 02 26 16.7, Dec +27 12 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 919 (= GC 5235, Marth #61, 1860 RA 02 18 11, NPD 63 26) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.2 arcmin (from images below). Corwin lists a companion at RA 02 27 51.8, Dec +45 56 49.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 919, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 919
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 919

NGC 920 (= PGC 9377 =
IC 1799)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1885) by Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Andromeda (RA 02 27 51.9, Dec +45 56 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 920 (Swift list II (#21), 1860 RA 02 18 34, NPD 44 39.7) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, 1 or 2 extremely faint stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 1.05 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 920
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 920
Below, a 1.6 by 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 920

NGC 921 (= PGC 9287)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1886) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Cetus (RA 02 26 33.4, Dec -15 50 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 921 (Ormond Stone list I (#52), 1860 RA 02 18 35, NPD 106 28.2) is "extremely faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 19 54. The corrected position precesses to RA 02 26 32.5, Dec -15 50 16, only 0.7 arcmin northwest of the galaxy's center, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.05 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 921
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 921
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 921

NGC 922 (= PGC 9172)
Discovered (Nov 17, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd? pec) in Fornax (RA 02 25 04.5, Dec -24 47 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 922 (= GC 540 = JH 2478 = WH III 239, 1860 RA 02 18 45, NPD 115 26.2) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, gradually pretty much better middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 922
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 922
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 922
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Wikimedia Commons)
'Raw' HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 922

NGC 923 (= PGC 9355)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1878) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Andromeda (RA 02 27 34.6, Dec +41 58 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 923 (Stephan list X (#11), 1860 RA 02 18 48, NPD 48 40.3) is "very faint, small, round, gradually then suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 923
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 923
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 923

NGC 924 (= PGC 9302)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1785) by
William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Aries (RA 02 26 46.8, Dec +20 29 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 924 (= GC 541 = WH III 474, 1860 RA 02 18 56, NPD 70 07.7) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.1 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 924
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 924
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 924

NGC 925 (= PGC 9332)
Discovered (Sep 13, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Triangulum (RA 02 27 16.8, Dec +33 34 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 925 (= GC 542 = JH 222 = WH III 177, 1860 RA 02 18 56, NPD 57 03.4) is "considerably faint, considerably large, extended, very gradually brighter middle, two 13th magnitude stars to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10.5 by 5.9 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SAB(s)d.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 925, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in some minor missing areas
Above, a NOAO image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 925
(Image Credit above & below Pat & Chris Lee/Flynn Haase/NOAO)
Below, a 9 arcmin wide NOAO image of the galaxy
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 925

NGC 926 (= PGC 9256)
Discovered (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Cetus (RA 02 26 06.7, Dec -00 19 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 926 (= GC 5236, Tempel list I (#9), 1860 RA 02 18 58, NPD 91 00.7) is "very faint, pretty small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 926
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 926
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 926

NGC 927 (= PGC 9292)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1885) by
Johann Palisa
Also discovered (Dec 2, 1885) by Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Aries (RA 02 26 37.3, Dec +12 09 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 927 (Palisa (#1), Swift list III (#11), 1860 RA 02 19 05, NPD 78 28.1) is "faint, small, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 927
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 927
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 927

NGC 928 (= PGC 9368)
Discovered (Sep 5, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)Sa?) in Aries (RA 02 27 41.0, Dec +27 13 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 928 (= GC 5237, Marth #62, 1860 RA 02 19 36, NPD 63 25) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.4 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 928
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 928
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 928

NGC 929 (= PGC 9334)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Cetus (RA 02 27 18.3, Dec -12 05 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 929 (Muller list II (#335), 1860 RA 02 19 45, NPD 102 43.2) is "extremely faint, small, extended 170°, 8.5 magnitude star 4 arcmin to north". The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 20 32. The corrected position precesses to RA 02 27 18.1, Dec -12 05 21, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.4 arcmin (from images below)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 929
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 929
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 929

NGC 930 (not = PGC 9379)
Recorded (Oct 26, 1872) by
Ralph Copeland
A nonexistent object Aries (RA 02 27 53.4, Dec +20 21 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 930 (= GC 5238, Copeland using Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope, 1860 RA 02 20 03, NPD 70 16.5) is "extremely faint, small, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle, II 489 one arcmin southeast", (WH) II 489 being NGC 932. The position precesses to RA 02 27 53.4, Dec +20 21 21, whence the position listed above, but there is nothing there. The description makes it clear that it is a fainter companion of the brighter NGC 932, but perversely, many modern catalogs list the bright object as NGC 930, which is completely backwards and therefore wrong. Per Corwin, Copeland recorded the position of several stars in the region, and they are all exactly where he recorded them, but there is nothing at the location listed for NGC 930, and a bright area on the northeastern corner of NGC 932 which is sometimes listed as NGC 930 is not only not in the right position, but is simply one of the "3 stars involved" in the NGC description of NGC 932. So there is nothing that corresponds to Copeland's observation, and it must be considered nonexistent.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 932, showing the supposed position of the nonexistent NGC 930
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 932, showing the supposed position of Copeland's nonexistent NGC 930. It could be argued that the nearby galaxy on the northeastern periphery of NGC 932 is NGC 930, but it is one of the "stars" Copeland measured, and cannot be his supposed nebula. More importantly, Dreyer's description of NGC 932 makes it clear that the galaxy is that NGC object, and not NGC 930, despite the fact that many modern catalogs incorrectly list it as NGC 930.

NGC 931 (= PGC 9399)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Triangulum (RA 02 28 14.5, Dec +31 18 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 931 (= GC 5239, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 02 20 03, NPD 59 19.2) is "faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.9 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 931, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 931
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 931

NGC 932 (= PGC 9379, and not =
NGC 930)
Discovered (Nov 29, 1785) by William Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S(rs)a?) in Aries (RA 02 27 54.7, Dec +20 19 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 932 (GC 543 = WH II 489, 1860 RA 02 20 06, NPD 70 17.2) is "faint, small, a little extended, 3 stars involved". The position precesses to RA 02 27 56.4, Dec +20 20 38, less than 0.8 arcmin from the center of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. Despite that, many modern catalogs list this galaxy as NGC 930, which the original NGC lists as a fainter companion lying an arcmin to the northeast of the brighter galaxy. This is completely backwards from Dreyer's description of the two objects, and therefore wrong. Even without the stated difference in brightness between NGC 930 and 932, the "3 stars involved" in the description of NGC 932 are clearly visible in its images (though as it happens, two of them are actually distant galaxies), confirming the proper identity.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 932, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in otherwise missing areas
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 932
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, which is not NGC 930
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 932, showing the 3 'stars' involved (two of which are actually distant galaxies) that confirm its identity

NGC 933 (= PGC 9465)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S??) in Andromeda (RA 02 29 17.5, Dec +45 54 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 933 (Swift list II (#20), 1860 RA 02 20 14, NPD 44 42.8) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, bright star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.75 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 933, also showing IC 1799
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 933, also showing IC 1799
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 933

NGC 934 (= PGC 9352)
Discovered (1876) by
Wilhelm Tempel (I-10)
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0/a?) in Cetus (RA 02 27 32.9, Dec -00 14 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 934 (= GC 5240, Tempel list I (#10), 1860 RA 02 20 26, NPD 90 52.7) is "very faint, extremely small, perhaps a planetary nebula?".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.1 arcmin (from images below)
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 934
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 934
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 934

NGC 935 (= PGC 9388, and with
IC 1801 = Arp 276)
Discovered (Sep 18, 1885) by Lewis Swift
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Aries (RA 02 28 11.2, Dec +19 35 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 935 (Swift list II (#22), 1860 RA 02 20 27, NPD 71 02.3) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, star 6 seconds of time to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1 arcmin? In the early stages of a collision with IC 1801. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of interacting galaxies.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 935 and its spiral companion, IC 1801, which comprise Arp 276
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 935 and IC 1801
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the interacting pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 935 and its spiral companion, IC 1801, which comprise Arp 276
Below, a ? arcmin wide false-color composite of ultraviolet, infrared and visible-light images of the pair
(Image Credit NASA / JPL-Caltech / L. Lanz (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA))
Composite of GALEX ultraviolet, Spitzer infrared, and visible-light images of spiral galaxy NGC 935 and its spiral companion, IC 1801, which comprise Arp 276

NGC 936 (= PGC 9359)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 10th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a?) in Cetus (RA 02 27 37.4, Dec -01 09 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 936 (= GC 544 = JH 223 = WH IV 23, 1860 RA 02 20 30, NPD 91 47.2) is "very bright, very large, round, much brighter middle and nucleus, western of 2", the other being NGC 941.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.7 by 4.1 arcmin? Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type SB(rs)0+.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 936
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS centered on NGC 936
Below, a 4.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 936

NGC 937 (= PGC 9480)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Andromeda (RA 02 29 28.1, Dec +42 14 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 937 (Stephan list XIII (#19), 1860 RA 02 20 39, NPD 48 22.7) is "a very faint star slightly nebulous".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 937
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 937
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 937

NGC 938 (= PGC 9423)
Discovered (Dec 30, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A 12th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Aries (RA 02 28 33.5, Dec +20 17 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 938 (= GC 5241, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 02 20 43, NPD 70 20.6) is "pretty bright, small, round, a little brighter middle, 11th magnitude star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 938 superimposed on a DSS image to fill in missing areas
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 938
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 938

NGC 939 (= PGC 9271)
Discovered (Oct 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Eridanus (RA 02 26 21.3, Dec -44 26 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 939 (= GC 545 = JH 2479, 1860 RA 02 21 00, NPD 135 04.3) is "very very faint, small, round, gradually very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 939
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 939
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 939

NGC 940 (= PGC 9478 =
NGC 952)
Discovered (Sep 26, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 940)
Also observed (December 1871) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 952)
A 12th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Triangulum (RA 02 29 27.5, Dec +31 38 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 940 (= JH 5242, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 02 21 07, NPD 58 59.0) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin??
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 940, overlaid on a DSS image to fill in missing areas
Above, a SDSS image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 940
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 940

NGC 941 (= PGC 9414)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Cetus (RA 02 28 27.9, Dec -01 09 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 941 (= GC 546 = JH 224 = WH III 261, 1860 RA 02 21 22, NPD 91 47.0) is "very faint, considerably large, round, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 936.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 1.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 941
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 941
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 941

NGC 942 (= PGC 9458, and with
NGC 943 = Arp 309)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller
Also observed (date?) Sherburne Burnham
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type Irr 0? pec?) in Cetus (RA 02 29 10.3, Dec -10 50 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 942 (Muller list I (#53), 1860 RA 02 21 30, NPD 101 27.2) is "very faint, round, perhaps a nebulous double star with (NGC) 943". The first Index Catalog lists a corrected position (per Burnham) of RA 02 22 23.5, NPD 101 28.1, and confirms that NGC 942 and 943 are a "double nebula, faint nuclei". (Note: Although the NGC clearly indicates that NGC 942 is the southern member of the pair, the identifications are often switched, especially when images show north on the bottom.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.65 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 943, as shown in the images below. The pair is used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an "unclassified" galaxy.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxies NGC 942 and 943, which comprise Arp 309; also shown is IC 230
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 942 and 943, also showing IC 230
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair of galaxies
DSS image of lenticular galaxies NGC 942 and 943, which comprise Arp 309

NGC 943 (= PGC 9459, and with
NGC 942 = Arp 309)
Discovered (1886) by Frank Muller
Also observed (date?) Sherburne Burnham
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec?) in Cetus (RA 02 29 09.7, Dec -10 49 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 943 (Muller list I (#54), 1860 RA 02 21 30, NPD 101 26.2) is "very faint, round, perhaps a nebulous double star with (NGC) 942". The first Index Catalog lists a corrected position (per Burnham) of RA 02 22 22.7, NPD 101 27.6, and confirms that NGC 942 and 943 are a "double nebula, faint nuclei". (Note: Although the NGC clearly indicates that NGC 943 is the northern member of the pair, the identifications are often switched, especially when images show north on the bottom.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.65 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 942, which see for images. The pair is used by the Arp Atlas as an example of an "unclassified" galaxy.

NGC 944 (=
IC 228 = PGC 9300)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later recorded as NGC 944)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 944)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1891) by Stephane Javelle (and later recorded as IC 228)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Cetus (RA 02 26 41.5, Dec -14 30 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 944 (Leavenworth list I (#62), 1860 RA 02 21 30, NPD 105 09.2) is "extremely faint, small, much extended 0°, suddenly brighter middle." The second Index Catalog lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 02 20 00, ninety seconds to the west of Leavenworth's position. The corrected position precesses to RA 02 26 41.2, Dec -14 31 17, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain; but by the time the correction was made Javelle had already rediscovered the object, leading to the double listing. (Per Corwin, even without Howe's correction, Leavenworth's original sketch and notes would have made it clear that despite his poorly recorded position, his observation was of the same object oberved by Javelle half a decade later.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin? (Corwin lists a companion at RA 02 26 39.2, Dec -14 30 45)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 944
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 944
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 944

NGC 945 (= PGC 9426)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Cetus (RA 02 28 37.3, Dec -10 32 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 945 (GC 547 = JH 225 = JH 2480 = WH II 487, 1860 RA 02 21 48, NPD 101 10.2) is "very faint, large, irregularly round, gradually a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 02 28 37.0, Dec -10 32 30, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 2.2 arcmin?
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 945, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas, also showing NGC 948
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 945, also showing NGC 948
(Image Credit above and below Bob Tait and John Kielty/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image of the galaxy
Composite of an NOAO image (for detail) and a DSS image (for brightness) of spiral galaxy NGC 945

NGC 946 (= PGC 9556)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1884) by
Édouard Stephan
A 13th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Andromeda (RA 02 30 38.5, Dec +42 13 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 946 (Stephan list XIII (#20), 1860 RA 02 21 49, NPD 48 23.6) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin??
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 946
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 946
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 946

NGC 947 (= PGC 9420)
Discovered (Nov 10, 1835) by
John Herschel
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Cetus (RA 02 28 33.1, Dec -19 02 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 947 (= GC 548 = JH 2481, 1860 RA 02 22 02, NPD 109 40.1) is "pretty bright, extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.1 arcmin.?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 947
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 947
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 947

NGC 948 (= PGC 9431, and not =
NGC 945)
Discovered (Nov 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Ormond Stone
Supposedly but probably not observed (date?) by Sherburne Burnham
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Cetus (RA 02 28 45.4, Dec -10 30 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 948 (Swift list V (#29), Ormond Stone list I (#??), 1860 RA 02 22 12, NPD 101 08.6) is "very faint, small, round". The position precesses to RA 02 29 01.0, Dec -10 30 57, at nearly the correct declination, but almost 16 seconds of time east of the galaxy listed above. Despite that error in position, a comparison of the description with that of NGC 945, which lies just to the southwest of NGC 948, makes the identification seem reasonably certain. The most questionable item is a "corrected" position in the first Index Catalog (per Burnham) of RA 02 21 47, NPD 101 10.1, which is identical to that for NGC 945, and would seem to make NGC 948 and NGC 945 duplicate listings. However, this equivalence (which probably means that Burnham actually observed NGC 945 and mistook it for NGC 948) was apparently never noticed, and the identification of NGC 948 with the fainter galaxy to the northeast of NGC 945 seems to have never been in doubt.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin??
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 948, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas, also showing NGC 945
Above, a NOAO image laid over a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 948, also showing NGC 945
(Image Credit above and below Bob Tait and John Kielty/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image of the galaxy
Composite of an NOAO image (for detail) and a DSS image (for brightness) NGC 948

NGC 949 (= PGC 9566)
Discovered (Sep 21, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 12th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Triangulum (RA 02 30 48.7, Dec +37 08 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 949 (= GC 549 = JH 226 = WH I 154, 1860 RA 02 22 15, NPD 53 29.4) is "considerably bright, large, extended, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 949
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 949
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 949
Below, a 0.7 arcmin wide HST image of the central core (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
Partially processed 'raw' HST image of central regions in spiral galaxy NGC 949
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 850 - 899) ←     NGC Objects: NGC 900 - 949     → (NGC 950 - 999)