Celestial Atlas
PGC 9000 - 9499 ←     PGC Objects: PGC 9500 - 9999 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → PGC 10000 - 10499
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Page last updated Jun 30, 2014

PGC 9892 (= Maffei 1)
An 11th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a pec?) in
Cassiopeia (RA 02 36 35.5, Dec +59 39 16)
Nearly hidden by clouds of gas and dust in the plane of the Milky Way, PGC 9892 (also known as Maffei 1) is not far from our Local Group of galaxies, and as a result was once thought to be a distant member of that Group. However, in addition to being in the opposite direction from the largest member of the Local Group (the Andromeda Galaxy), the galaxy is now known to be about 5 times further away. It and its nearby companion, PGC 10217, were discovered during an infrared survey of the so-called Zone of Avoidance (in which distant galaxies are rarely seen because of the gas and dust lying in the plane of our galaxy) by Paolo Maffei in 1968, and as a result are often called Maffei 1 and 2. If it weren't obscured, and even its fainter outer regions could be seen in visible light, PGC 9892 would be over 70 times brighter, about 6th magnitude, and one of the ten or so brightest galaxies in the sky. As it is, it and its companion, which are now believed to be among the major members of the relatively nearby IC 342/Maffei Group of galaxies, are very faint reddish blobs when seen in visible light. It is only through infrared observations that their true appearance can be properly estimated. PGC 9892's recessional velocity of only 65 km/sec is too small to be of any use in estimating its Hubble expansion distance, and redshift-independent distance estimates aren't much more help, ranging from 7 to 14 million light years. However, as noted above, it and its companion are believed to be about five times the distance of the Andromeda Galaxy, or about 10 million light years away, and if so, the galaxy's apparent size of 3.35 by 1.7 arcmin would indicate that it is about 10 thousand light years across. However, that only refers to the size of the relatively bright core. If we could see the entire structure it would be over 20 arcmin across, and the galaxy is probably over 70 thousand light years across, and about the same true brightness as our own Milky Way galaxy. As such, it is probably the closest relatively large elliptical galaxy to our own. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E3. (Note: a Wikisky search for PGC 9892 incorrectly shows PGC 892; this is a common Wikisky truncation error. Use Maffei 1 or the coordinates to see the correct object, labeled as PGC 9892.)
DSS visible-light image of elliptical galaxy PGC 9892, also known as Maffei 1
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide visible-light view of PGC 9892
Below, a natural-appearing infrared view of the same region (Image Credits: 2 Micron All Sky Survey)
2MASS simulated natural appearance infrared image of elliptical galaxy PGC 9892, also known as Maffei 1
Below, a 12 arcmin wide visible-light image centered on the galaxy
(If not obscured by the Milky Way, the galaxy would appear nearly twice as large as this field of view)
DSS visible-light image of region near elliptical galaxy PGC 9892, also known as Maffei 1
Below, a half degree wide visible-light view showing Maffei 1 (PGC 9892) and Maffei 2 (PGC 10217)
DSS visible-light image centered of region between elliptical galaxy PGC 9892, also known as Maffei 1, and spiral galaxy PGC 10217, also known as Maffei 2
Below, a half degree wide false-color infrared view showing Maffei 1 (PGC 9892) and Maffei 2 (PGC 10217)
(Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/WISE Team)
WISE deliberately false-color infrared image centered of region between elliptical galaxy PGC 9892, also known as Maffei 1, and spiral galaxy PGC 10217, also known as Maffei 2

PGC 9936
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in (RA 02 37 24.3, Dec -01 49 18)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 9936
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 9936
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 9936

PGC 9973 (almost certainly not =
NGC 1037)
Not an NGC object but sometimes (almost certainly incorrectly) called NGC 1037
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b?) in Cetus (RA 02 37 58.7, Dec -01 50 39)
Due to its misidentification as NGC 1037, see here for anything else.
Celestial Atlas
PGC 9000 - 9499 ←     PGC Objects: PGC 9500 - 9999     → PGC 10000 - 10499