Celestial Atlas
PGC 25500 - 25999 ←     PGC Objects: PGC 26000 - 26499 Link for sharing this page on Facebook     → PGC 26500 - 26999
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Page last updated Jun 7, 2016

PGC 26089 (=
NGC 2789 = NGC 3167)
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SA0(rs)a?) in Cancer (RA 09 14 59.7, Dec +29 43 49)
For anything else see NGC 2789

WORKING HERE: Update to current standards

PGC 26124
A 15th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in
Lynx (RA 09 15 44.5, Dec +44 14 10)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 9650 km/sec, PGC 26124 is about 450 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.55 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 26124
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 26124
Below, a 12 arcmin region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy PGC 26124
Below, the same field with labels for PGC Objects 26132, 2239251 and 3098124
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy PGC 26124, also showing PGC 26132 and 3098124 (collectively known as Arp 55) and PGC 2239251

WORKING HERE: Update to current standards

PGC 26132 (with PGC 3098124 =
Arp 55)
A 15th-magnitude galaxy (type Sc pec) in Lynx (RA 09 15 55.5, Dec +44 19 58)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 11920 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 26132 is about 555 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 525 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 535 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin, PGC 26132 is about 120 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of interacting galaxies PGC 26132 and PGC 3098124, collectively known as Arp 55
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of Arp 55; also shown are PGC Objects 82353 and 2242096
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near interacting galaxies PGC 26132 and PGC 3098124, collectively known as Arp 55
Below, the same view showing labels for other PGC objects, including PGC 26124 and 2242434
SDSS image of region near interacting galaxies PGC 26132 and PGC 3098124, collectively known as Arp 55; also shown are labels for PGC 26124, 82353, 2242096 and 2242434

WORKING HERE: Update to current standards

PGC 3098124 (with
PGC 26132 = Arp 55)
Listed here since a companion of PGC 26132
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type pec?) in Lynx (RA 09 15 5.7, Dec +44 19 52)
(Listed in NED as UGC 04881 NED02.) Even without its recessional velocity, which at 11780 km/sec is essentially the same as that of its companion, PGC 26132 (which see for images), the interaction between it and the other galaxy would imply that it is at about the same distance (of 525 million light years). Given that and its apparent size of 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin, PGC 3098124 is about 30 thousand light years across. Note: The only listed magnitude is for radio wavelengths, so the optical magnitude is based on a comparison of its appearance to that of its companion and nearby galaxies of known brightness. The actual value could be as much as a magnitude fainter.


PGC 26142
A magnitude 13.2 irregular galaxy (type IAm?) in
Ursa Major (RA 09 16 03.2, Dec +52 50 32)
Physical Information: Vr = -70 (too close for Universal expansion to be of any use in determining distance). Redshift-independent distance estimates 3.5 to 4.5 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 3.2 by 1.9 arcmin (from images below), it is only about 3500 to 4000 light years across, whence its description as a dwarf irregular galaxy. (Referred to as UGC 4879 on the Hubblesite page quoted below.)
     Quote from Hubblesite (to be edited for brevity) The drizzle of stars scattered across this image forms a galaxy known as UGC 4879. UGC 4879 is an irregular dwarf galaxy — as the name suggests, galaxies of this type are a little smaller and messier than their cosmic cousins, lacking the majestic swirl of a spiral or the coherence of an elliptical. This galaxy is also very isolated. There are about 2.3 million light years between UGC 4879 and its closest neighbour, Leo A, which is about the same distance as that between the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way. This galaxy’s isolation means that it has not interacted with any surrounding galaxies, making it an ideal laboratory for studying star formation uncomplicated by interactions with other galaxies. Studies of UGC 4879 have revealed a significant amount of star formation in the first 4-billion-years after the Big Bang, followed by a strange nine-billion-year lull in star formation, ended 1-billion-years ago by a more recent reignition. The reason for this behaviour, however, remains mysterious, and the solitary galaxy continues to provide ample study material for astronomers looking to understand the complex mysteries of starbirth throughout the Universe.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy PGC 26142
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 26142
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy PGC 26142
Below, a HST image of the galaxy overlaid on a 3 arcmin wide version of the SDSS image above
(Image Credit ESA/NASA)
HST image of irregular galaxy PGC 26142
Celestial Atlas
PGC 25500 - 25999 ←     PGC Objects: PGC 26000 - 26499     → PGC 26500 - 26999