Celestial Atlas
PGC 34500 - 34999 ←PGC Objects: PGC 35000 - 35499 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ PGC 35500 - 35999
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Page last updated Jan 27, 2020

PGC 35041 (=
NGC 3664 = Arp 5)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m? pec) in Leo (RA 11 24 25.2, Dec +03 19 43)
For anything else see NGC 3664

PGC 35295
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc? pec) in
Leo (RA 11 28 13.3, Dec +04 19 02)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8250 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 35295 is about 385 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was 370 to 375 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, 375 to 380 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.25 by 0.45 arcmin, the galaxy is about 135 thousand light years across.
Possible Interaction With NGC 3685: The recessional velocity for PGC 35295 is only 365 km/sec smaller than that of NGC 3685, which isn't that much larger than typical random motions ("peculiar velocities") of galaxies relative to each other, so it is quite possible that the two galaxies are either a physical pair or that they had a relatively recent close passage, which could explain the peculiar structure of the supposedly slightly nearer (by about 15 to 20 million light years) PGC 35295. If the galaxies are a physical pair, they would actually be at about the same distance, or about 380 to 385 million light years away; but that would not affect the estimate of the physical size of either galaxy.
SDSS image of region near NGC 3685, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 35295
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 3685, also showing PGC 35295
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 35295 (and part of NGC 3685)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 35295, also showing part of NGC 3685

PGC 35345 (with
PGC 2580146 = Arp 296, and not Arp 299)
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 28 45.9, Dec +58 35 37)
Physical Properties: Based on a recessional velocity of 17825 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 35345 is about 830 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was 775 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, 795 to 800 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 135 thousand light years across.
 Given their nearly identical recessional velocities, the two members of Arp 296 are probably a physical pair (this is not always the case with Arp objects). If so, then the average of their recessional velocities should probably be used to determine their distance; doing that indicates that they were nearly 775 million light years away when the light by which we see them was emitted, just over 795 million years ago, but the insignificant change in their individual distance estimates makes no difference in their estimated physical sizes, especially given the difficulty of accurately measuring their apparent sizes.
Arp Designation and Errors: With PGC 2580146, PGC 35345 is used in the Arp Atlas as an example of a double or multiple galaxy with long filaments, which is correctly described in the Atlas as a "Long st. filament almost to attachment with arm of spiral", but is misidentified by the Atlas as NGC 3690 and IC 694, which are actually (more or less) Arp 299. Thanks to this mistake, PGC 35345 and 2580146 are sometimes mistakenly listed as Arp 299(!), thereby doubling the number of errors involved.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 35345, which with PGC 2580146 comprises Arp 296, and not Arp 299; also shown are NGC 3690 and IC 964, which are more or less the correct Arp 299
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 35345
Also shown are PGC 2580146, NGC 3690 and IC 694
Below, a 4.4 arcmin wide SDSS image centered between Arp 296 and Arp 299
SDSS image of region between spiral galaxy PGC 35345, which with PGC 2580146 comprises Arp 296, and NGC 3690 and IC 964, which are more or less Arp 299
Below, a 2 by 3.5 arcmin wide SDSS image showing Arp 296
SDSS image of region between spiral galaxies PGC 35345 and PGC 2580146, which comprise Arp 296, and not Arp 299
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 35345
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 35345, which with PGC 2580146 comprises Arp 296

PGC 2580146 (with
PGC 35345 = Arp 296, and not Arp 299)
Discussed here instead of at its normal position due to its association with PGC 35345
A magnitude 17.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 11 28 50.6, Dec +58 33 37)
Physical Properties: Based on a recessional velocity of 17800 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 2580146 is about 825 to 830 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 770 to 775 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 795 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.45 by 0.1 arcmin for the main part of the galaxy (from the images below), the galaxy is about 325 thousand light years across; but there is an apparent faint extension toward PGC 35345 which spans an additional 0.7 arcmin, or another 155 to 160 thousand light years. So although apparently insignificant and barely visible in the images shown here (and in the Arp Atlas), the nearly 485 thousand light year long filamentary feature extending from the galaxy's southern end nearly to its northern companion is one of the largest structures known in any spiral galaxy.
 Given their nearly identical recessional velocities, the two members of Arp 296 are probably a physical pair (this is not always the case with Arp objects). If so, then the average of their recessional velocities should probably be used to determine their distance; doing that indicates that they were nearly 775 million light years away when the light by which we see them was emitted, just over 795 million years ago, but the insignificant change in their individual distance estimates makes no difference in their estimated physical sizes, especially given the difficulty of accurately measuring their apparent sizes.
Note About PGC Designation: Both NED and LEDA list this galaxy as PGC 2580146, but a search of the NED for that designation fails; searching for Arp 296 NED02 or SDSSJ112850.64+583336.7 will find its page.
Arp Designation and Errors: With PGC 35345, PGC 2580146 is used in the Arp Atlas as an example of a double or multiple galaxy with long filaments, which is correctly described in the Atlas as a "Long st. filament almost to attachment with arm of spiral", but is misidentified by the Atlas as NGC 3690 and IC 694, which are actually (more or less) Arp 299. Thanks to this mistake, PGC 35345 and 2580146 are sometimes mistakenly listed as Arp 299(!), thereby doubling the number of errors involved.
SDSS image of region between spiral galaxies PGC 35345 and PGC 2580146, which comprise Arp 296, and not Arp 299
Above, a 2 by 3.5 arcmin wide SDSS image showing Arp 296
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 2580146; for other images, see PGC 35345
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 2580146, which with PGC 35345 comprises Arp 296

PGC 35381 (= HCG 53D)
a member of
Hickson Compact Group 53
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Leo (RA 11 29 14.7, Dec +20 46 23)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6280 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 35381 is about 290 to 295 million light years away (which means that it is an actual member of Hickson Compact Group 53). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 35 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 35381, a member of Hickson Compact Group 53, also showing NGC 3697, another member of the Group
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 35381, also showing NGC 3697
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 35381, a member of Hickson Compact Group 53
Below, an 8 arcmin wide labeled SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 53
Labeled SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 53
Celestial Atlas
PGC 34500 - 34999 ←PGC Objects: PGC 35000 - 35499→ PGC 35500 - 35999