Celestial Atlas
(IC 1600 - 1649) ←IC Objects: IC 1650 - 1699 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 1700 - 1749)
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Page last updated Aug 9, 2021
Added updated Corwin positions, Updated formatting to current standards, added Dreyer entries
NEXT: Check galaxy types (NED+), add basic pix, captions, tags

IC 1650
(= PGC 4334 = ESO 195-034)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Phoenix (RA 01 12 19.1, Dec -50 24 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1650 (DeLisle Stewart #146, 1860 RA 01 06 16±, NPD 141 08) is "considerably faint, small, much extended 55°, considerably brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1651
Recorded (Nov 25, 1897) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
Three stars in Cetus (RA 01 13 27.6, Dec +02 04 21)
Corwin lists the southern star at RA 01 13 17.3, De +02 03 48; and a companion star at RA 01 14 56.3, Dec +31 56 54
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1651 (Bigourdan #368, 1860 RA 01 06 17, NPD 88 39) is "a 13th magnitude star with nebulosity, chiefly north-north-following (on the north-northeastern side)."
Note About PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA usually assigns a PGC designation to NGC/IC objects, even if they are not galaxies; but in this case, there is no designation, and a search of the database says so.
Physical Information: Per Steinicke, the northern star of 3 in a north-south line.

IC 1652
(= PGC 4498 = UGC 792 = CGCG 502-009 = MCG +05-04-003)

Discovered (Oct 17, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Pisces (RA 01 14 56.3, Dec +31 56 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1652 (Javelle #848, 1860 RA 01 07 10, NPD 58 48.1) is "faint, small, extended north-south, 12th magnitude star very close."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1653 (=
NGC 443)
(= PGC 4512 = UGC 796 = CGCG 502-010 = MCG +05-04-005)

Discovered (Oct 8, 1861) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 443)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1653)
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/(r)a?) in Pisces (RA 01 15 07.6, Dec +33 22 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1653 (Javelle #849, 1860 RA 01 07 20, NPD 57 21.9) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 443.

IC 1654
(= PGC 4520 = UGC 798 = CGCG 502-011 = MCG +05-04-004)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Pisces (RA 01 15 11.8, Dec +30 11 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1654 (Javelle #850, 1860 RA 01 07 29, NPD 60 32.9) is "faint, small, a little extended, gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin?

IC 1655 (an OCL in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
(= "PGC 3518513")

Discovered (Sep 6, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Discovered (Nov 27, 1900) by DeLisle Stewart
An open cluster in Tucana (RA 01 11 54.4, Dec -71 19 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1655 (DeLisle Stewart #147, (Dunlop #59), 1860 RA 01 07 33, NPD 162 05) is "a cluster,. compressed, extremely faint, very small."
Discovery Note: At the time the IC2 was published, Dunlop's discoveries were not trusted in Europe, unless confirmed by John Herschel in the 1830's. However, it is now felt certain that his #59 was an observation of open cluster IC 1655, hence the credit given to him above, and the insertion of his observation (in parentheses) in the IC entry. As a result of the omission of Dunlop's observation in the literature of the day, Stewart's observation was an independent discovery.
Note About PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA usually assigns a PGC designation to NGC/IC objects, even if they are not galaxies; in this case there is a designation, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being placed in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1656 (=
NGC 447)
(= PGC 4550 = UGC 804 = CGCG 502-013 = MCG +05-04-006)

Discovered (Oct 8, 1861) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 447)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1656)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)0/a) in Pisces (RA 01 15 37.6, Dec +33 04 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1656 (Barnard, 1860 RA 01 07 50, NPD 57 39.1) is "a nebula, small (faint) star close south-following (to the southeast), 9th magnitude star 3 arcmin south-following (to the southeast)."
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 447.

IC 1657 (=
IC 1663)
(= PGC 4440 = PGC 688268 = ESO 352-024 = MCG -06-03-030)

Discovered (Sep 4, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1657)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1663)
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Sculptor (RA 01 14 07.1, Dec -32 39 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1657 (Swift list XI (#14), 1860 RA 01 07 53, NPD 123 24.4) is "extremely faint, small, very much extended."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1658 (=
NGC 444)
(= PGC 4561 = UGC 810 = CGCG 502-015 = MCG +05-04-007)

Discovered (Oct 26, 1854) by R. J. Mitchell (and later listed as NGC 444)
Discovered (Oct 17, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1658)
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Pisces (RA 01 15 49.6, Dec +31 04 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1658 (Javelle #851, 1860 RA 01 08 04, NPD 59 39.1) is "very faint, pretty small, extended, nuclear, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 444 for anything else.

IC 1659
(= PGC 4584 = UGC 812 = CGCG 502-017 = MCG +05-04-008)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.1 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Pisces (RA 01 16 06.0, Dec +30 20 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1659 (Javelle #852, 1860 RA 01 08 21, NPD 60 23.1) is "faint, small, round, nuclear, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 1660 (an OCL in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
(= "PGC 3518514")

Discovered (Nov 27, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
An open cluster in Tucana (RA 01 12 37.9, Dec -71 45 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1660 (DeLisle Stewart #148, 1860 RA 01 08 23, NPD 162 30) is "extremely faint, very small, round, stellar nucleus or faint star in middle."
Note About PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA usually assigns a PGC designation to NGC/IC objects, even if they are not galaxies; in this case there is a designation, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being placed in quotes.
Physical Information:

IC 1661 (=
NGC 451)
(= PGC 4594 = CGCG 502-019 = MCG +05-04-011)

Discovered (Nov 10, 1881) by Édouard Stephan(and later listed as NGC 451)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1661)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Pisces (RA 01 16 12.4, Dec +33 03 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1661 (Barnard, 1860 RA 01 08 25, NPD 57 39.4) is "extremely faint, small, round."
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 451.

IC 1662 (an OCL in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
(= "PGC 3518515")

Discovered (Nov 27, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
An open cluster in Tucana (RA 01 12 33.0, Dec -73 27 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1662 (DeLisle Stewart #149, 1860 RA 01 08 41, NPD 164 12) is "very faint, extremely small, very small cluster?"
Note About PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA usually assigns a PGC designation to NGC/IC objects, even if they are not galaxies; in this case there is a designation, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being placed in quotes.
Physical Information:

IC 1663 (=
IC 1657)
(= PGC 4440 = PGC 688268 = ESO 352-024 = MCG -06-03-030)

Discovered (Sep 4, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1657)
Discovered (Oct 30, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1663)
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Sculptor (RA 01 14 07.1, Dec -32 39 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1663 (Swift list XI (#15), 1860 RA 01 09 31, NPD 121 24.1) is "extremely faint, much extended 350°, [PD 54.1 arcmin?]."
Note About PGC Designation: LEDA does not recognize the identification of IC 1663 as a duplicate observation of IC 1657, so it contains no entry for IC 1663. The PGC and other designations shown above are therefore those for IC 1657.
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see IC 1657.

IC 1664
Recorded (Nov 27, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A pair of stars in Tucana (RA 01 14 18.7, Dec -69 48 43)
Corwin lists stars at 01 14 20.74 -69 48 33.2; 01 14 16.63 -69 48 52.9; and (comp *) 01 14 14.82 -69 48 51.9
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1664 (DeLisle Stewart #150, 1860 RA 01 09 49, NPD 160 33) is "2 faint stars involved in most extremely faint nebulosity."
Note About The Lack Of A PGC Designation: LEDA not only does not have an entry for the pair of stars above, but lists PGC 4410 as IC 1664, so I have created an entry for that object immediately below this one. (NED, on the other hand, provides absolutely no information about the stars, but does list them as IC 1664.)
Physical Information:

PGC 4410
(= ESO 051-025, but almost certainly not =
IC 1664)
A magnitude ? spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in ? (RA 01 13 44.1, Dec -69 50 45)
Historical (Mis?)identification:
Physical Information:

IC 1665
Recorded (Nov 12, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
Three stars in Andromeda (RA 01 17 45.0, Dec +34 42 06)
Corwin lists stars at 01 17 45.728 +34 42 02.96; 01 17 44.692 +34 42 07.21; and 1 17 44.919 +34 42 00.14
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1665 (Javelle #853, 1860 RA 01 09 54, NPD 56 02.3) is "faint, very small, round, like 2 or 3 faint stars in nebulosity."
Note About PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA usually assigns a PGC designation to NGC/IC objects, even if they are not galaxies; but in this case, there is no designation, and a search of the database says so.
Physical Information:

IC 1666
(= PGC 4782 = UGC 857 = CGCG 502-030 = MCG +05-04-019)

Discovered (Nov 12, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle (854)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Pisces (RA 01 19 53.4, Dec +32 28 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1666 (Javelle #854, 1860 RA 01 10 44, NPD 58 16.1) is "faint, pretty small, diffuse, 13th magnitude star attached."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1667
(= PGC 4694 = MCG -03-04-039)

Discovered (Oct 6, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 01 18 42.3, Dec -17 03 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1667 (Swift list XI (#16), 1860 RA 01 10 47, NPD 107 51.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1667 does not recognize that designation, and says so; however, such a search returns a result for PGC 4694, which is IC 1667, so the information shown above is appropriate.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 1668
(= PGC 4712 = CGCG 502-024)

Discovered (Nov 30, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 18 53.0, Dec +33 10 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1668 (Javelle #855, 1860 RA 01 11 03, NPD 57 33.5) is "extremely faint, very small, round, very faint nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1669
(= PGC 4802 = CGCG 502-032)

Discovered (Nov 30, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 20 06.8, Dec +33 11 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1669 (Javelle #856, 1860 RA 01 12 16, NPD 57 32.7) is "very faint, small, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1670
(= "PGC 3166491" (= PGC 4707 + PGC 4711))
(PGC 4707 = MCG -03-04-041 = "IC 1670A" / "IC 1670B"),
and (PGC 4711 = MCG -03-04-040 = "IC 1670B" / "IC 1670A")

Discovered (Dec 18, 1895) by
Lewis Swift
A pair of galaxies in Cetus
PGC 4711 = A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) at RA 01 18 48.8, Dec -16 48 12)
PGC 4707 = A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) at RA 01 18 52.8, Dec -16 48 12)
Corwin lists the eastern galaxy (PGC 4707) as IC 1670, and the western (PGC 4711) as a companion (??)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1670 (Swift list XI (#17), 1860 RA 01 12 22, NPD 107 35.2) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended, 2 stars near north-following (to the northeast)."
Note About PGC Designations: A search of LEDA for IC 1670 returns no result, and says so. NED claims that IC 1670 is listed as LEDA PGC 3166491, but a search of LEDA for that designation returns no result with that designation, as shown by placing it in quotes. However, it does return three results, two of which are the two galaxies listed as PGC 4707 and PGC 4711, a shown above.
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: There are no standards for adding letters to NGC/IC designations, so their addition is more or less random, and can lead to nothing but confusion. In the present case, most catalogs refer to the western of the two galaies, PGC 4711, as IC 1670B, and the eastern, PGC 4707, as IC 1670A; but I have seen references in which those letter designations are reversed, as shown above. For that reason, such non-standard "letter" designations should never be used except as a warning against their use.
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 4707 = 1.9 by 0.4 arcmin? Of PGC 4711 = 1.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1671 (=
IC 93)
(= PGC 4724 = PGC 889345 = MCG -03-04-043)

Discovered (Sep 18, 1889) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 93)
"Rediscovered" (Dec 18, 1895) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1671)
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Cetus (RA 01 19 02.4, Dec -17 03 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1671 (= Swift list XI (#18), 1860 RA 01 12 42, NPD 107 50.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, 7th magnitude star 47 sec of time north-following (to the northeast)." The position precesses to more than half a degree east of the correct position, so its identity (and identification with IC 93) might never have been realized, save for one thing ― the star 47 sec northeast. Swift's earlier observation (which had an accurate position, and could be properly identified) had noted an 8th-magnitude star 46 sec east and 1 arcmin north. Per Corwin, the fact that both observations involve the same distance from what is undoubtedly the same star means that although the position measured for IC 1671 was very different from that for IC 93, they were actually the same object; so for anything else, see IC 93. (Note: Supposedly some catalogs list IC 93 and IC 1671 as separate objects, or IC 1671 as nonexistent; however, every reference I have seen shows them as duplicate listings.)
Physical Information: Given the almost certain duplicate listing, see IC 93 for anything else.
Possible Companion: Corwin lists a companion (PGC 4725) at RA 01 19 03.0, Dec -17 01 26, but since IC 1671 = IC 93, that is taken care of there

IC 1672
(= PGC 4848 = UGC 872 = CGCG 502-036 = MCG +05-04-024)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Pisces (RA 01 20 38.2, Dec +29 41 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1672 (Javelle #857, 1860 RA 01 12 52, NPD 61 02.4) is "pretty bright, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1673
(= PGC 4855 = CGCG 502-038)

Discovered (Nov 17, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Pisces (RA 01 20 46.3, Dec +33 02 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1673 (Javelle #858, 1860 RA 01 12 59, NPD 57 42.8) is "faint, round, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1674
(?? = PGC 4746 = PGC 461184 = ESO 196-002 (per HyperLEDA))

Recorded (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A lost or nonexistent object in Phoenix (RA 01 19 00.0, Dec -50 38 00)
Corwin lists a "possible" ID (with ??) at RA 01 19 18.4, Dec -50 57 49
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1674 (DeLisle Stewart #151, 1860 RA 01 13 06, NPD 141 23) is "extremely faint, extremely small, brighter middle, 2 spiral wisps."
 LEDA says this is as shown above. NED says "nothing here; Is ESO 196-002 = IC 1674?"
Physical Information: Per Steinicke, a possible plate defect.

PGC 4746
(= PGC 461184 = ESO 196-002)

Listed here because LEDA states and NED asks if this is IC 1674

IC 1675
(= PGC 4876 = UGC 879 =CGCG 521-005 = MCG +06-04-004)

Discovered (1896) by
Hermann Kobold
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Andromeda (RA 01 20 59.8, Dec +34 14 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1675 (Kobold (#2), 1860 RA 01 13 08, NPD 56 29.2) is "faint, small."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1676
(= PGC 4871 = CGCG 502-041)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 20 58.6, Dec +30 15 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1676 (Javelle #859, 1860 RA 01 13 13, NPD 60 28.3) is "faint, very small, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1677
(= PGC 4891 = CGCG 502-042 = MCG +05-04-025)

Discovered (Nov 30, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 21 07.0, Dec +33 12 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1677 (Javelle #860, 1860 RA 01 13 16, NPD 57 30.8) is "faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1678
(= PGC 4875 = CGCG 411-028)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 "compact" galaxy (type C??) in Pisces (RA 01 21 02.5, Dec +05 33 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1678 (Javelle #861, 1860 RA 01 13 46, NPD 85 10.9) is "faint, very small. round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1679
(= PGC 4944 = CGCG 502-048 = MCG +05-04-027)

Discovered (Dec 2, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 21 44.5, Dec +33 29 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1679 (Javelle #862, 1860 RA 01 13 55, NPD 57 14.7) is "faint, small, irregular figure, very little brighter middle, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1680
(= PGC 4956 = CGCG 502-049 = MCG +05-04-028)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Pisces (RA 01 21 51.2, Dec +33 16 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer., IC 1680 (Javelle #863, 1860 RA 01 14 00, NPD 57 26.8) is "faint, very small, brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1681
(= PGC 4916 = UGC 894 = CGCG 385-080 = MCG +00-04-097)

Discovered (Dec 18, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 01 21 21.3, Dec +00 05 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1681 (Javelle #864, 1860 RA 01 14 12, NPD 90 38.8) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1682
(= PGC 4983 = UGC 912 = CGCG 502-053 = MCG +05-04-032)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 22 13.2, Dec +33 15 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1682 (Javelle #865, 1860 RA 01 14 22, NPD 57 30.7) is "faint, very small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1683
(= PGC 5008 = UGC 916 = CGCG 521-010 = MCG +06-04-008)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Andromeda (RA 01 22 38.9, Dec +34 26 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1683 (Javelle #866, 1860 RA 01 14 46, NPD 56 17.7) is "faint, small, extended north-south, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1684
(= PGC 169770)

Discovered (Dec 1, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 22 53.1, Dec +33 24 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1684 (Javelle #867, 1860 RA 01 15 03, NPD 57 20.7) is "faint, small, round, diffuse."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1684 says it cannot find that object; but it does show results for an object near its supposed position, namely PGC 169770, which is the generally accepted identification of IC 1684!
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1685
(= PGC 169771)

Discovered (Dec 1, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 23 06.6, Dec +33 11 23)
Corwin lists a northern component at RA 01 23 06.7, Dec +33 11 25, and a southern at RA 01 23 06.6, Dec +33 11 21
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1685 (Javelle #868, 1860 RA 01 15 15, NPD 57 32.2) is "faint, small, round, very little brighter middle, diffuse."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1685 says there is no known object with that name; but a search for PGC 169771 does bring up the galaxy listed above, though without any mention of its probable IC identification.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1686 (=
NGC 499)
(= PGC 5060 = UGC 926 = CGCG 502-059 = MCG +05-04-038)

Discovered (Sep 12, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 499)
Discovered (Dec 1, 1899) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1686)
A magnitude 12.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 23 11.5, Dec +33 27 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1686 (Javelle #869, 1860 RA 01 15 21, NPD 57 18.1) is "pretty bright, pretty small, a little extended preceding-following (west-east), gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: This entry will only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 499.

IC 1687
(= PGC 5074 = CGCG 502-061 = MCG +05-04-039)

Discovered (Dec 1, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.7 "compact" galaxy (type C??) in Pisces (RA 01 23 19.1, Dec +33 16 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1687 (Javelle #870, 1860 RA 01 15 30, NPD 57 27.3) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1688
(= PGC 169774)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle (871)
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Pisces (RA 01 23 28.0, Dec +33 04 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1688 (Javelle #871, 1860 RA 01 15 35, NPD 57 40.1) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1688 says there is no known object with that name; but a search for PGC 169774 does bring up the galaxy listed above, though without any mention of its probable IC identification.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1689
(= PGC 5108 = CGCG 502-070 = MCG +05-04-046)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?? PRG??) in Pisces (RA 01 23 47.9, Dec +33 03 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1689 (Javelle #872., 1860 RA 01 15 55, NPD 57 41.8) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, 14th magnitude star close."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1690
(= PGC 5110 = CGCG 502-071)

Discovered (Nov 30, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Pisces (RA 01 23 49.5, Dec +33 09 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1690 (Javelle #873, 1860 RA 01 15 58, NPD 57 34.2) is "faint, very small, round, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1691
(= PGC 169777)

Discovered (Dec 2, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 24 25.8, Dec +33 24 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1691 (Javelle #874, 1860 RA 01 16 35, NPD 57 21.4) is "pretty faint, very small, round, diffuse."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1691 says there is no known object with that name; but a search for PGC 169777 does bring up the galaxy listed above, though without any mention of its probable IC identification.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1692
(= PGC 5203 = CGCG 502-076)

Discovered (Nov 30, 1899) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Pisces (RA 01 24 39.5, Dec +33 14 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1692 (Javelle #875, 1860 RA 01 16 49, NPD 57 31.0) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1693
(= PGC 73940)

Discovered (Jan 1, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cetus (RA 01 24 02.4, Dec -01 39 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1693 (Howe list III (#2), 1860 RA 01 16 55, NPD 92 23.2) is "extremely faint, very small, possibly (just) a faint star."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1693 says there is no known object with that name; but a search for PGC 73940 does bring up the galaxy listed above, though without any mention of its probable IC identification.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin? Per Steinicke, foreground star superimposed.

IC 1694
(= PGC 5221 = CGCG 385-111)

Discovered (Nov 28, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 01 24 47.7, Dec +01 36 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1694 (Bigourdan #246, 1860 RA 01 17 37, NPD 89 07) is "very faint, small, much brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1695
(= PGC 5245 = UGC 977 = CGCG 411-054 = MCG +01-04-055)

Discovered (Nov 26, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.0 "compact" galaxy (type C??) in Pisces (RA 01 25 07.6, Dec +08 41 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1695 (Swift list XI (#19), 1860 RA 01 17 39, NPD 81 59.7) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, 10th magnitude star attached preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information: SIMBAD lists this a multiple galaxy, with a magnitude 14.0 southern component, and a magnitude 16.5(?) northwestern component. In DSS images, it appears that there is another possible component or companion on the northeast, but better images and GAIA data show that it is only a magnitude 15 star. Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1696
(= PGC 5231 = UGC 973 = CGCG 385-113 = MCG +00-04-122)

Discovered (Jan 19, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E1??) in Cetus (RA 01 24 52.3, Dec -01 37 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1696 (Howe list III (#3), 1860 RA 01 17 44, NPD 92 20.9) is "extremely faint, extremely mall, 530 north-preceding (to the northwest)," 530 being NGC 530.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1697
(= PGC 5238 = UGC 976 = CGCG 385-116 = MCG +00-04-125)

Discovered (Dec 18, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 01 25 02.9, Dec +00 26 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1697 (Javelle #876, 1860 RA 01 07 53, NPD 90 17.3) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1698 (=
IC 1699?)
(= PGC 5261 = PGC 169791 = UGC 983 = CGCG 436-045 = MCG +02-04-040)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1698)
Perhaps rediscovered (Dec 26, 1897) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1699)
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SA:(r)0/a) in Pisces (RA 01 25 22.1, Dec +14 50 20)
Historical Idenification: Per Dreyer, IC 1698 (Javelle #877, 1860 RA 01 17 57, NPD 75 53.3) is "pretty bright, small, irregular figure, brighter middle and nucleus." The position precesses to RA 01 25 24.1, Dec +14 50 32, only about 0.5 arcmin northeast of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the only other object nearby is accounted for by IC 1700 (which is now known to also be IC 107), so the identification is certain. (See IC 1699 for a discussion of its very uncertain identification as a duplicate observation of IC 1698.)
Physical Information: Given their close position in the sky and as it turns out, very similar recessional velocities, PGC 5250, IC 107, and IC 1698 are almost certainly physical companions, so their distances are best determined by using an average of recessional velocities relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background. The calculations involved are shown in the entry for IC 107, and place the group about 280 to 285 million light-years from us. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.55 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below), IC 1698 is about 125 to 130 thousand light-years across. The somewhat peculiar appearance of IC 107 (which see) and the definitely strange appearance and active star-formation in the outer ring of IC 1698 suggest a relatively recent interaction between the pair.
Classification Note: As shown in the last image below, there is a strong, broad inner ring, and the outer ring has a bluish tinge that indicates considerable star-forming activity. Since the outer ring is slightly incomplete, it is listed as (R') instead of (R), and Corwin raises the possibility that we are looking right down a bar, and suggested adding the colon (A:) to the classification to indicate uncertainty about whether the galaxy is barred or unbarred. Otherwise, the "type" shown above is what I had posted as my own educated guess.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1698, also showing IC 107 (usually referred to as IC 1700) and PGC 5250 (often misidentified as IC 107)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1698; also shown are IC 107 and PGC 5250
(Note: PGC 5250 is often misidentified as IC 107, and IC 107 is usually referred to as IC 1700)
(The "bright" star at right is the magnitude 10.0 variable star BD+14 215)
Below, a 1.75 by 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy (Post-processing of all images by Courtney Seligman)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1698
Below, the image above processed to better show the outer ring and its (exaggerated) bluish tinge
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1698

IC 1699 (perhaps =
IC 1698??), and if so
(= PGC 5261 = PGC 169791 = UGC 983 = CGCG 436-045 = MCG +02-04-040

Recorded (Dec 26, 1897) by Stephane Javelle
If = IC 1698, A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(r)/a?) in Pisces (RA 01 25 22.1, Dec +14 50 20)
otherwise, a lost or nonexistent object, or
perhaps the object at RA 01 25 13.3, Dec +14 52 21
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1699 (Javelle #878, 1860 RA 01 17 58, NPD 75 46.7) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1699 states that there is no such entry, but shows the entry for IC 1698 which as noted above, is thought to be another observation of the same object.
Physical Information: Per Steinicke, possibly a duplicate observation of IC 1698 = PGC 5261; but if so, why the different descriptions? (But Corwin agees w/Steinicke, suggesting a 5 arcmin single-digit error in one of Javelle's offsets from his comparison star.)
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1600 - 1649) ←IC Objects: IC 1650 - 1699→ (IC 1700 - 1749)