Celestial Atlas
(IC 1650 - 1699) ←IC Objects: IC 1700 - 1749 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 1750 - 1799)
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1700, 1701, 1702, 1703, 1704, 1705, 1706, 1707, 1708, 1709, 1710, 1711, 1712, 1713, 1714, 1715, 1716,
1717, 1718, 1719, 1720, 1721, 1722, 1723, 1724, 1725, 1726, 1727, 1728, 1729, 1730, 1731, 1732, 1733,
1734, 1735, 1736, 1737, 1738, 1739, 1740, 1741, 1742, 1743, 1744, 1745, 1746, 1747, 1748, 1749

Page last updated Aug 5. 2021
Checked updated Corwin positions, added Dreyer entries, updated formatting

IC 1700 (=
IC 107)
(= PGC 5271 = UGC 986 = CGCG 436-047 = MCG +02-04-041)

Discovered (Sep 18, 1890) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 107)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1700)
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/SAB(r)0 pec) in Pisces (RA 01 25 24.7, Dec +14 51 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1700 (Javelle #879, 1860 RA 01 18 00, NPD 75 51.6) is "pretty bright, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus." The position precesses to RA 01 25 27.2, Dec +14 52 14, about 0.7 arcmin northeast of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and the other galaxy in the region is accounted for by Javelle's discovery (on the same night) of IC 1698, which has a similar offset in its position, so the identification is certain.
Identification With IC 107: See IC 107 for a discussion of its identification as an earlier observation of IC 1700. Note that PGC 5250 is usually misidentified as IC 107, the correct IC 107 is therefore often listed only as IC 1700, and a search for IC 107 will usually end up with the wrong galaxy.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 107 for anything else.

IC 1701
(= PGC 5309 = UGC 1002 = CGCG 459-050 = MCG +03-04-035)

Discovered (Dec 23, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 01 25 50.4, Dec +18 11 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1701 (Javelle #880, 1860 RA 01 18 19, NPD 72 32.0) is "faint, small, diffuse, nucleus 13th magnitude."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1702
(= PGC 5321 = UGC 1005 = CGCG 459-051 = MCG +03-04-036)

Discovered (Oct 12, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Pisces (RA 01 25 56.3, Dec +16 36 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1702 (Swift list XI (#20), 1860 RA 01 18 22, NPD 74 07.9) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, very difficult, between 2 stars north-south."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1703 (=
NGC 557)
(= PGC 5351 = UGC 1016 = CGCG 385-136 = MCG +00-04-144)

Discovered (Nov 20, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 557)
Discovered (Oct 27, 1897) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1703)
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Cetus (RA 01 26 25.1, Dec -01 38 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1703 (Bigourdan #369, 1860 RA 01 19 18, NPD 92 23) is "extremely faint, small, diffuse."
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 557 for anything else.

IC 1704
(= PGC 5411 = UGC 1027 = CGCG 436-054 = MCG +02-04-052)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Pisces (RA 01 27 09.5, Dec +14 46 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1704 (Javelle #881, 1860 RA 01 19 26, NPD 76 00.6) is "pretty bright, pretty small, diffuse, irregular figure, gradually a very little brighter middle." (See IC 1706 for the solution of a problem with Javelle's positions for IC 1704 and 1706.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1705
(= PGC 5377 = PGC 1070504 = MCG -01-04-048)

Discovered (Jul 3, 1895) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.4 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Cetus (RA 01 26 44.8, Dec -03 30 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1705 (Howe list I (#4), 1860 RA 01 19 39, NPD 94 13.8) is "a nebulous star of magnitude 12, faint double star 2 arcmin north-following (to the northeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1706
(= PGC 5433 = CGCG 436-057)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)b? pec) in Pisces (RA 01 27 31.0, Dec +14 49 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1706 (Javelle #882, 1860 RA 01 19 48, NPD 75 58.0) is "faint, small, diffuse, very little brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 01 27 15.4, Dec +14 45 42, to the southeast of IC 1704(!), which lies about 5 arcmin to the southwest of the galaxy listed above. However, there is a problem with this position and the one that Javelle measured for IC 1704 on the same night. Namely, the relative positions of the two objects are accurate, but they are both well to the southwest of where the galaxies lie. Per Corwin, the problem is that Javelle misidentified his comparison star (he thought it was BD +13 214, but it was actually an unlisted star about 5 arcmin to the northeast). Correcting for that mistake, the positions for Javelle #881 and #882 become essentially dead-on the respective galaxies, and since the description also fits, IC 1706 must be the galaxy listed above.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 6190 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 1706 is about 285 to 290 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.41 by 0.38 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 35 thousand light-years across. The galaxy has a single 'heavy' arm that wraps almost all the way round the galaxy, creating a nearly complete ring (whence the classification shown in the description line; thanks are due to Harold Corwin for slightly revising my educated guess).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1706, also showing IC 1704
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1706, also showing IC 1704
Below, a 0.7 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1706

IC 1707
Recorded (Jan 8, 1899) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Andromeda (RA 01 28 00.0, Dec +37 07 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1707 (Bigourda #370, 1860 RA 01 20 56, NPD 57 08) is "extremely faint, diffuse, 13.3 magnitude star close."
Note About PGC Designation: Since this object is lost or nonexistent, a search of LEDA for IC 1707 returns no result, and says so.
Physical Information:

IC 1708 (an OCL in the Small Magellanic Cloud)
(= PGC 270136)

Discovered (Nov 27, 1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
An open cluster in Hydrus (RA 01 24 55.8, Dec -71 11 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1708 (DeLisle Stewart #152, 1860 RA 01 21 00, NPD 161 55) is "very faint, very small, round, 9th magnitude star 4 arcmin south-following (to the southeast)."
Physical Information:

IC 1709 (=
NGC 568)
(= PGC 5468 = ESO 353-003 = MCG -06-04-037)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 568)
Discovered (Sep 4, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1709)
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Sculptor (RA 01 27 57.0, Dec -35 43 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1709 (Swift list XI (#21), 1860 RA 01 21 46, NPD 126 29.5) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult."
Note About The PGC Mis-designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1709 returns PGC 5483, which is almost certainly the wrong identification, but because of that misidentification, is discussed in the following entry. For the correct IC 1709, search LEDA for NGC 568.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 568 for anything else. (Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 5483, which appears to be misidentified as IC 1709) at RA 01 28 13.1, Dec -35 40 08, but that is also discussed on the other page.)

PGC 5483 (not =
IC 1709)
(= ESO 353-004)

Not an IC object but listed here because LEDA misidentifies it as IC 1709
A magnitude ? galaxy (type ?) in (RA 01 28 13.1, Dec -35 40 08)
Historical Misidentification:
Physical Information:

IC 1710 (=
NGC 575)
(= PGC 5634 = UGC 1081 = CGCG 459-072 = MCG +03-04-051)

Discovered (Oct 17, 1876) by Édouard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 575)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1710)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Pisces (RA 01 30 46.6, Dec +21 26 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1710 (Javelle #883, 1860 RA 01 23 10, NPD 69 17.1) is "faint, pretty large, diffuse. 13.5 magnitude star attached."
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 575 for anything else.

IC 1711
(= PGC 5643 = UGC 1082 = CGCG 459-073 = MCG +03-04-052)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Pisces (RA 01 30 55.3, Dec +17 11 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1711 (Javelle #884, 1860 RA 01 23 24, NPD 73 31.7) is "faint, pretty large, extended 260°, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1712 (=
NGC 584)
(= PGC 5663 = MCG -01-04-060)

Discovered (Sep 10, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 584)
Discovered (Nov 30, 1885) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1712)
Discovered (Dec 10, 1888) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1712)
A magnitude 10.5 elliptical galaxy (type E4??) in Cetus (RA 01 31 20.7, Dec -06 52 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1712 (Barnard, (Swift list III #6), 1860 RA 01 24 20, NPD 97 35.4) has "no description."
Discovery Note: Per Steinicke, Swift observed this object as shown above, and added to the IC description in parentheses, but apparently Dreyer missed it.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 584 for anything else.

IC 1713
Recorded (Nov 28, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.3 star in Triangulum (RA 01 32 43.8, Dec +35 19 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1713 (Bigourdan #247, 1860 RA 01 24 43, NPD 55 24) is "a 13th magnitude star, nebulous?"
Note About PGC Misidentification: A search of LEDA for IC 1713 returns an entry for NGC 587, which is certainly wrong. As a result, there is no actual PGC designation for IC 1713. (A search of NED returns the correct object, but since NED does not bother with stellar objects, there is no information given there except the statement that IC 1713 is a star.)
Physical Information:

IC 1714
(= PGC 944130)

Discovered (Sep 20, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SB??) in Cetus (RA 01 32 53.1, Dec -13 01 29)>br? Corwin lists an uncertain identification as PGC 5772 at RA 01 32 58.9, Dec -10 27 07 instead of the object above
He also lists an uncertain identification as a duplicate of IC 141 at 01 32 51.7, -14 58 52
and an uncertain identification as a duplicate of NGC 594 at 01 32 56.9, -16 32 09
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1714 (Swift list XII (#7), 1860 RA 01 26 02, NPD 104 13.2) is "most extremely faint, small, a little extended, very diffuse. 8th magnitude star to north."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1714 returns a message stating that there is no such object. However, a search for PGC 944130 does show the object that is shown as IC 1714 in the title for this entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1715
(= PGC 5805 = UGC 1115 = CGCG 437-003 = MCG +02-05-002)

Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 irregular galaxy (type Im??) in Pisces (RA 01 33 34.2, Dec +12 35 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1715 (Javelle #885, 1860 RA 01 26 12, NPD 78 08.2) is "faint, small, round, nuclear, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1716
Recorded (Oct 29, 1897) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.7 star in Cetus (RA 01 33 26.9, Dec -12 18 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1716 (Bigourdan #371, 1860 RA 01 26 33, NPD 103 02) is "extremely faint, mottled but not resolved, nebulous?"
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1716 returns a message stating that there is no such object; so there is no PGC designation for IC 1716.
Physical Information:

IC 1717
Recorded (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A lost or nonexistent object in Hydrus (RA 01 32 30.0, Dec -67 32 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1717 (DeLisle Stewart #153, 1860 RA 01 28 18, NPD 158 15) is "extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 25°, stellar nucleus."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1717 returns a message stating that there is no such object, which is reasonable, since it appears to be either lost or nonexistent (Steinicke suggests that it was a plate defect, in which case it is nonexistent).

IC 1718
(= PGC 6068 = CGCG 502-122 = CGCG 503-002)

Discovered (Nov 13, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 "compact" galaxy (type C??) in Triangulum (RA 01 38 26.8, Dec +33 21 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1718 (Javelle #886, 1860 RA 01 30 28, NPD 57 22.1) is "faint, very small, pretty round, 13.5 magnitude star attached."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1719
(= PGC 6020 = ESO 353-027 = MCG -06-04-059)

Discovered (Sep 4, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Sculptor (RA 01 37 35.9, Dec -33 55 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1719 (Swift list XI (#22), 1860 RA 01 31 22, NPD 124 42.0) is "very faint, small, round, considerably faint star near north-following (to the northeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.2 arcmin?

IC 1720
(= PGC 6180 = ESO 413-019 = MCG -05-05-008)

Discovered (Oct 30, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Sculptor (RA 01 40 21.6, Dec -28 54 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1720 (Swift list XI (#23), 1860 RA 01 33 38, NPD 119 38.6) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, bright star preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 1721
(= PGC 6235 = UGC 1187 = CGCG 412-015 = MCG +01-05-019)

Discovered (Jan 17, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Pisces (RA 01 41 24.4, Dec +08 31 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1721 (Javelle #887, 1860 RA 01 34 03, NPD 82 10.9) is "pretty bright, pretty small, extended preceding-following (west-east), gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1722
(= PGC 6319 = ESO 353-034 = MCG -06-04-067)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Sculptor (RA 01 43 03.0, Dec -34 11 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1722 (DeLisle Stewart #154, 1860 RA 01 36 36, NPD 124 54) is "faint, small, considerably extended 45°."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1723
(= PGC 6332 = UGC 1205 = CGCG 412-022 = MCG +01-05-028)

Discovered (Dec 17, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Pisces (RA 01 43 14.2, Dec +08 53 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1723 (Javelle #888, 1860 RA 01 36 51, NPD 81 54.4) is "faint, pretty large, extended 200°, gradually a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1724
(= PGC 6328 = ESO 353-035 = MCG -06-04-068)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Sculptor (RA 01 43 09.7, Dec -34 14 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1724 (DeLisle Stewart #155, 1860 RA 01 36 54, NPD 124 55) is "faint, small, considerably extended 175°."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin?

PGC 6334
(= ESO 353-036 = MCG -06-04-069

Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
IC 1724
A magnitude ? galaxy (type ?) in Sculptor (RA 01 43 18.3, Dec -34 12 22)
Physical Information:

IC 1725
(= PGC 6432 = CGCG 460-022 = CGCG 482-009)

Discovered (Jan 17, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Pisces (RA 01 45 11.8, Dec +21 46 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1725 (Javelle #889, 1860 RA 01 37 29, NPD 68 54.9) is "faint, small, pretty round, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1726
(= PGC 6441 = CGCG 412-025)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(s)b pec) in Pisces (RA 01 45 19.8, Dec +04 37 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1726 (Javelle #890, 1860 RA 01 38 03, NPD 86 05.1) is "faint, very small, gradually brighter middle, 13.5 magnitude star close." The position precesses to RA 01 45 19.3, Dec +04 37 09, less than 0.1 arcmin northwest of the center of the galaxy listed above and on its northwestern rim, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 5040 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 1726 is about 235 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.32 by 0.28 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is a little over 20 thousand light-years across. Usually, such a small galaxy would be more irregular than not, so its complex structure is very unusual.
Note About Classification: On DSS images this is just a small blob, so it is usually listed as "compact" or even "extremely compact"; but in SDSS images it is obviously a peculiar spiral ("peculiar" partly due to its unusual structure and partly due to the blue region southwest of the nucleus (which, due to lack of study, has no explanation). Thanks to Harold Corwin for slightly revising the guesstimate I sent him, and providing the classification (R':)SAB(s)b: pec (I left out the colons simply because I don't include them in classifications for other galaxies, and didn't want this to be the only one in this catalog to include them).
SDSS image of region near peculiar spiral galaxy IC 1726
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1726
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of peculiar spiral galaxy IC 1726

IC 1727
(= PGC 6574= UGC 1249 = CGCG 482-014 = MCG +04-05-009)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1896) by
Isaac Roberts
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SBm??) in Triangulum (RA 01 47 30.0, Dec +27 19 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1727 (Roberts, 1860 RA 01 39 39, NPD 63 22.3) is "faint, large, star involved. I 157 north-following (to the northeast)," WH I 157 being NGC 672.
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.7 by 2.4 arcmin? Several 'knots' have positions given by Corwin.

IC 1728
(= PGC 6584 = ESO 353-047 = MCG -06-05-002)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Fornax (RA 01 47 44.5, Dec -33 36 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1728 (DeLisle Stewart #156, 1860 RA 01 41 25, NPD 124 18) is "faint, small, extended 160°, much brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1729
(= PGC 6598 = ESO 477-004 = MCG -05-05-014)

Discovered (Oct 8, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
Discovered (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Fornax (RA 01 47 55.3, Dec -26 53 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1729 (Swift list XI (#24), Howe, 1860 RA 01 41 28, NPD 117 35.4) is "pretty bright, extremely small; almost stellar, partially resolved (some stars seen)?"
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 1730
(= PGC 6732 = CGCG 482-020 = MCG +04-05-015A)

Discovered (Jan 17, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 01 49 57.9, Dec +22 00 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1730 (Javelle #891, 1860 RA 01 42 12, NPD 68 43.2) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1731
(= PGC 6756 = UGC 1291 = CGCG 482-021 = MCG +04-05-018)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1896) by
Isaac Roberts
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Triangulum (RA 01 50 12.4, Dec +27 11 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1731 (Roberts, 1860 RA 01 42 19, NPD 63 29.7) is "faint, extended north-preceding south-following (northwest-southeast), brighter middle, probably spiral."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1732
(= PGC 6805 = UGC 1307 = CGCG 522-021 = MCG +06-05-016)

Discovered (Nov 6, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Andromeda (RA 01 50 47.9, Dec +35 55 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1732 (Bigourdan #248, 1860 RA 01 42 39, NPD 54 46) is "very faint, pretty small, much brighter middle, extremely faint star involved?"
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1733
(= PGC 6796 = UGC 1301 = CGCG 503-032 = MCG +05-05-016)

Discovered (Nov 13, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.0 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Triangulum (RA 01 50 42.9, Dec +33 04 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1733 (Javelle #892, 1860 RA 01 42 40, NPD 57 36.2) is "faint, very small, pretty round, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1734
(= PGC 6679 = ESO 353-048 = MCG -06-05-003)

Discovered (Nov 17, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
Discovered (1899) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Fornax (RA 01 49 17.1, Dec -32 44 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1734 (Swift list XI (#25), DeLisle Stewart, 1860 RA 01 42 45, NPD 123 27.3) is "very faint, pretty small, a little extended 100°, brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin?

IC 1735
(= PGC 6803 = PGC 6812 = PGC 2023084 = MCG +05-05-018)

Discovered (Nov 13, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Triangulum (RA 01 50 51.7, Dec +33 05 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1735 (Javelle #893, 1860 RA 01 42 48, NPD 57 35.6) is "very faint, very small, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1736
(= PGC 6814 = UGC 1309 = CGCG 460-032 = MCG +03-05-020)

Discovered (Dec 23, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Aries (RA 01 50 53.2, Dec +18 18 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1736 ( Javelle #894, 1860 RA 01 43 17, NPD 72 24.2) is "faint, pretty small, extended 210°, gradually a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1737
Recorded (Nov 6, 1891) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of magnitude 15.0 and 15.2 stars in Andromeda (RA 01 51 42.7, Dec +36 15 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1737 (Bigourdan #249, 1860 RA 01 43 29, NPD 54 27) is "extremely faint, 3 or 4 very faint stars in nebula."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1737 returns no result, and says so; so there is no PGC designation for IC 1737.
Physical Information: (Separated by about 30 arcsec?)

IC 1738
(= PGC 6832 = MCG -02-05-061)

Discovered (Dec 8, 1895) by
Lewis Swift
Discovered (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBb??) in Cetus (RA 01 51 07.9, Dec -09 47 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1738 (Swift list XI (#26), Howe, 1860 RA 01 44 13, NPD 100 29.2) is "extremely faint, very small, I 62 preceding (to the west)," WH I 62 being NGC 701.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1739
(= PGC 6777 = ESO 354-001 = MCG -06-05-007)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Fornax (RA 01 50 29.6, Dec -34 03 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer. IC 1739 (DeLisle Stewart #157, 1860 RA 01 44 14, NPD 124 45) is "considerably faint, considerably small, round, much brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?

PGC 6785
Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
IC 1739
A magnitude ? galaxy (type ?) in Fornax (RA 01 50 36.0, Dec -34 04 06)
Physical Information:

IC 1740
Recorded (Sep 6, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A pair of magnitude 13.0 and 13.8 stars in Fornax (RA 01 48 51.7, Dec -30 05 12)
Corwin also lists a possible alternative at RA 01 51 36.9, Dec -29 55 23
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1740 (Swift list XI (#27), 1860 RA 01 44 56, NPD 120 38.3) is "pretty bright, extremely small, a little extended, like a double star."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of LEDA for IC 1740 returns no result, and says so; so there is no PGC designation for IC 1740.
Physical Information:

IC 1741
(= PGC 6900 = MCG -03-05-023)

Discovered (Jan 1, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Cetus (RA 01 51 56.8, Dec -16 47 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1741 (Howe list III (#4), 1860 RA 01 45 12, NPD 107 28.8) is "extremely faint, extremely faint, = 690?" 690 referring to NGC 690, which is actually well to the west of IC 1741.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1742
(= PGC 6996 = CGCG 482-028 = MCG +04-05-023)

Discovered (Jan 11, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Aries (RA 01 53 14.2, Dec +22 43 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1742 (Javelle #895, 1860 RA 01 45 28, NPD 67 58.5) is "faint, small, a little extended preceding-following (west-east), gradually a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1743 (=
NGC 716)
(= PGC 6982 = UGC 1351 = CGCG 437-049 = MCG +02-05-054)

Discovered (Sep 1, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 716)
Discovered (Jan 1, 1892) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1743)
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Aries (RA 01 52 59.7, Dec +12 42 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1743 (Bigourdan #250, 1860 RA 01 45 32, NPD 77 59) is "very faint, pretty small, a little brighter middle, diffuse, = 716?" 716 being NGC 716, which is indeed the same galaxy.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 716 for anything else.

IC 1744 (=
NGC 719)
(= PGC 7019 = UGC 1360 = CGCG 460-040 = MCG +03-05-026)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1861) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 719)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1744)
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 01 53 38.9, Dec +19 50 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1744 (Javelle #896, 1860 RA 01 45 58, NPD 70 50.4) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 719 for anything else.

IC 1745
(= PGC 174317)

Discovered (Jan 1, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 01 52 59.1, Dec -16 40 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1745 (Howe list III (#5), 1860 RA 01 46 15, NPD 107 21.6) is "extremely faint, extremely small."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1746
(= PGC 7076 = UGC 1371 = CGCG 412-042 = MCG +01-05-043)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Pisces (RA 01 54 24.3, Dec +04 48 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1746 (Javelle #897, 1860 RA 01 47 07, NPD 85 53.1) is "faint, small, pretty round, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1747
(= "PGC 3518478")

Discovered (1905) by
Williamina Fleming
A magnitude 12.0 planetary nebula in Cassiopeia (RA 01 57 35.7, Dec +63 19 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1747 (Fleming #103, 1860 RA 01 47 22, NPD 27 23) is "planetary, stellar."
Note About PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA assigns PGC designations to many NGC/IC objects that aren't galaxies; but as in most such cases, a search of the database for the designation shown above returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.32 arcmin?

IC 1748
(= PGC 7229 = UGC 1403 = CGCG 460-052 = CGCG 461-006 = MCG +03-06-002)

Discovered (Nov 2, 1899) by
Johann Palisa
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Aries (RA 01 56 08.9, Dec +17 38 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1748 (Palisa ([AN] 3634 (#1)), 1860 RA 01 48 32, NPD 73 02.8) is "very faint."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1749
(= PGC 7235 = UGC 1407 = CGCG 413-003 = MCG +01-06-001)

Discovered (Dec 9, 1895) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Pisces (RA 01 56 11.1, Dec +06 44 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1749 (Javelle #898, 1860 RA 01 48 50, NPD 83 56.7) is "faint, small, extended north-south, binuclear, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1650 - 1699) ←IC Objects: IC 1700 - 1749→ (IC 1750 - 1799)