Celestial Atlas
(IC 1800 - 1849) ←IC Objects: IC 1850 - 1899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 1900 - 1949)
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Page last updated July 20, 2021
WORKING 1855, 1892 (Arp 332)
Checked updated Corwin positions, checked/added Dreyer entries
Updated formatting and designations to current standards
LATER: Check historical IDs (Corwin+), add basic pix, captions, tags

IC 1850 (=
NGC 1111??? or NGC 1109????)
(= PGC 1426583)

Possibly recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1109)
Possibly recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1111)
Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1850)
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aries (RA 02 48 39.3, Dec +13 15 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1850 (Javelle #955, 1860 RA 02 41 02, NPD 77 20.7) is "faint, small, diffuse." The position precesses to RA 02 48 40.6, Dec +13 14 29, only an arcmin south southeast of the galaxy listed above, so the identification is reasonably certain. However, as noted in the entries for NGC 1109 and 1111, whether it is either or neither of those NGC objects is a matter of considerable debate, and it is probably best to consider NGC 1109 and 1111 as lost, and discuss the candidates suggested for their identification (one of which is IC 1850) independently, and without any reference to their possible NGC connections except as a warning against giving much credence to such identifications.
Note About PGC Designation: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1850 states that there is no such object in the database, but returns 3 "nearby" objects, of which the one shown above is the only reasonable candidate for the IC object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 9010 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1850 is about 420 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 395 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 400 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 60 to 65 thousand light-years across.
PanSTARRS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1850, often but probably misidentified as NGC 1111, and just as likely to be (or not be) NGC 1109; also shown is IC 1852, which is often but probably misidentified as NGC 1109 and/or NGC 1112
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on IC 1850, also showing IC 1852
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1850, often but probably misidentified as NGC 1111, and just as likely to be (or not be) NGC 1109

IC 1851
(= HD 17581 = "PGC 3518691")

Recorded (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 6 star (and emission nebula?) in Cassiopeia (RA 02 51 45.9, Dec +58 18 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1851 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 41 17, NPD 32 16.1) is "a 6.2 magnitude star, nebula attached south-preceding (to the southwest), 5 arcmin long." The position precesses to RA 02 51 46.4, Dec +58 18 52, exactly on 6th magnitude star HD 17581, so the identification is certain. The only question is whether there is a nebula at this position, or Barnard simply mistook the glare from the star as a nebulous glow (though Corwin suggests that having being photographically observed, the 'nebula' may have been a plate defect).
Note About The PGC Designation: LEDA assigns a PGC designation for most NGC/IC objects, regardless of their nature; but although it did so in this case, a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being in quotes.
DSS image of region near HD 17581, the star listed as IC 1851
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the star listed as IC 1851

IC 1852 (=
NGC 1109??? or NGC 1112???)
(= PGC 10660 = UGC 2293 = CGCG 440-015 = MCG +02-08-011)

Possibly recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1109)
Possibly recorded (Dec 2, 1863) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1112)
Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 1852)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)c) in Aries (RA 02 49 00.4, Dec +13 13 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1852 (Javelle #956, 1860 RA 02 41 21, NPD 77 22.9) is "faint, pretty small, round, gradually brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 02 48 59.6, Dec +13 12 15, a little over an arcmin due south of the only nearby galaxy, so the IC identification is certain. However, its possible correlation with previously recorded NGC objects is far more complicated and equally uncertain. IC 1852 has been tentatively identified as the otherwise lost NGC 1109 (by LEDA) and as the otherwise lost NGC 1112 (by NED, although with a caveat that the identification is very uncertain; LEDA doesn't even list NGC 1112). As discussed at their respective NGC entries, these identifications are so uncertain that it seems best to treat the NGC entries as lost, and only refer to the galaxies in this region by their IC or PGC or other non-NGC designations, and only mention the possible NGC connections as a warning against giving any credence to those identifications.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8215 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1852 is about 380 to 385 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 370 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, just over 375 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 110 to 115 thousand light-years across.
 The galaxy to the south of IC 1852 (WISEA J024859.80+131231.1) is not a companion, but a much more distant object, with a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background of 27550 km/sec, putting it (taking into account the relativistic expansion of the Universe during the time that it took its light to reach us) about 1160 million light-years distant at the time at which the light by which we now see it left it, about 1215 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the nearly 155 million light-year expansion of the intervening space during that time). Other than its apparent size and type (a roughly 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin lenticular galaxy (type S0?), from the images below), nothing appears to be known about that galaxy, hence my decision not to bother with a separate entry for it.
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1852, often but almost certainly misidentified as NGC 1109 and/or NGC 1112; also shown is IC 1850, which is often but probably misidentified as NGC 1111
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on IC 1852, also showing IC 1850
Below, a 1.5 by 2.0 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of IC 1852 and its far more distant optical double
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 1852, often but almost certainly misidentified as NGC 1109 and/or NGC 1112, also showing WISEA J024859.80+131231.1

IC 1853
(= PGC 10595 = MCG -02-08-006)

Discovered (Jan 23, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 02 48 04.3, Dec -13 59 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1853 (Howe list III (#8), 1860 RA 02 41 26, NPD 104 34.7) is "extremely faint, very small, (NGC) 1103 following (to the east) 2 seconds of time (and) 2 arcmin north." The position precesses to RA 02 48 04.9, Dec -13 59 30, right on the galaxy, but even if the position was a bit off the accurate description of its position relative to NGC 1103 would make the identification certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 3940 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 1853 is about 180 to 185 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 75 thousand light-years across.
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1853, also showing NGC 1103
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on IC 1853; also shown is NGC 1103
Below, a 1.7 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 1853

IC 1854
(= PGC 10684 = CGCG 463-020)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type SAB(r)0/a? pec) in Aries (RA 02 49 20.7, Dec +19 18 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1854 (Javelle #957, 1860 RA 02 41 28, NPD 71 16.3) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle and nucleus." The position precesses to RA 02 49 20.9, Dec +19 18 49, just over half an arcmin north of the galaxy, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8650 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1854 is about 400 to 405 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 390 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 395 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin for the bright inner part of the galaxy and about 0.75 to 0.55 arcmin for its faint outer regions (from the images below), the main galaxy is about 50 thousand light-years across, while its outer fringes span about 85 thousand light-years. Because of its unusually bright core, the galaxy is classified as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1.5 or 2).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 1854
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 1854
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 1854

WORKING HERE: Need physical properties for PGC 10821 and 10822
IC 1855 (perhaps =
NGC 1117 + PGC 10821)
(= PGC 10822 = CGCG 440-022 = MCG +02-08-019) + (PGC 10821 = MCG +02-08-020)
(and as PGC 10821 + PGC 10822 + PGC 200207, = UGC 2337 = "PGC 3166718")

Presumably observed (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle
A lost object in Aries at or near RA 02 49 16.0, Dec +13 21 55, or
a pair of galaxies in Aries at RA 02 51 13.0, Dec +13 11 19
PGC 10822 = A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) at RA 02 51 13.1, Dec +13 11 07
PGC 10821 = A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) at RA 02 51 13.0, Dec +13 11 31
Historical Misidentification: Per Dreyer, IC 1855 (Javelle #958, 1860 RA 02 41 37, NPD 77 13.2) is "faint, pretty large, double north south, binuclear." The position precesses to RA 02 49 16.0, Dec +13 21 55 (whence the "lost" position shown above), but there is nothing there, and based on a comment by Corwin, PGC 1431167 was plucked from the sky as simply the closest object that might be IC 1855, on the basis of the fact that the galaxy and the magnitude 12.0 star to its south more or less match the description, and even though 5.5 arcmin north-northwest of the IC2 position, they are the only thing near that position that could be what Javelle saw. However, though as a result of Corwin's decades-old decision, NED lists PGC 1431167 as IC 1855, it now seems almost certain that it is not IC 1855, and although a search of LEDA for IC 1855 returns a page for PGC 1431167, it does not state that the galaxy is the IC object.
Historical Re-(Mis?)Identification: The key to (hopefully) correctly identifying IC 1855 is a comment in Javelle's paper stating that he also observed NGC 1115 and 1116, which lie well to the east-southeast of PGC 1431167, and somewhat but not quite as far to the west-northwest of the pair of galaxies listed above, which are therefore now listed as IC 1855, and the southern component of which is treated as NGC 1117 (though that is just as if not even more uncertain than the identification as IC 1855; so see the entry for NGC 1117 for a discussion of its hoary history). Unfortunately, as noted by Corwin, there is no way to know what comparison stars were used to observe the known NGC objects, but if Javelle made two simple mistakes in his calculations for IC 1855 (misidentifying comparison star BD +12 393 as BD +12 394, and accidentally reversing the sign of the offset in polar distance), then his declination would exactly match that of NGC 1117. However, although Javelle's original right ascension was very close to that of IC 1855, if BD +12 393 was the comparison star, there would be a two minute error in the right ascension, which apparently cannot be explained. So there are horrible problems with Javells's position, no matter what objects are treated as candidates for IC 1855.
Note About PGC Designation for UGC 2337: It us unusual for HyperLEDA to assign a PGC designation for a UGC object that doesn't have some other designation, but in this case it did, as shown above; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is placed in quotes.
Physical Information: PGC 10821 is sometimes called "NGC 1117A", so its properties are discussed in the entry immediately below. This section will cover the properties of PGC 10822. 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below)
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 10822, which might be NGC 1117, and elliptical galaxy PGC 10821, which with PGC 10822 might comprise IC 1855, also showing PGC 200207, which is either an elliptical galaxy or a star
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the pair of galaxies that might be IC 1855
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of what may be IC 1855, and might include NGC 1117 (= PGC 10822?)
Also shown is the foreground star listed as PGC 200207
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 10822, which might be NGC 1117; also shown are PGC 200207 and elliptical galaxy PGC 10821, with which PGC 10822 might comprise IC 1855

PGC 10821
(= "NGC 1117A", and perhaps = the northern component of
IC 1855)
(and with PGC 10822 and PGC 200207, = UGC 2337 = "PGC 3166718")

Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 1117A
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E/S0?) in Aries (RA 02 51 13.0, Dec +13 11 31)
Historical (Mis?)Identification: As discussed in the entry for NGC 1117, if NGC 1117 is the southern component of IC 1855, then PGC 10821 is the northern component of that IC object. As can be seen at the entry for IC 1855, even its identification is very uncertain, Based on a recessional velocity of 7585 km/sec, PGC 10821 is about 355 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images referred to), counting its faint outer extensions, it is about ? thousand light-years across. It is part of a pair with PGC 10822 (which see for images), and is often mistakenly connected with the star listed as PGC 200207.

PGC 200207
(with
PGC 10821 and PGC 10822, = UGC 2337)
Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes "associated" with IC 1855
A magnitude 16 star in Aries (RA 02 51 13.6, Dec +13 11 16)
Rationale For Inclusion Here: (1) Per HyperLEDA, PGC 200207 is considered to be part of UGC 2337, which is IC 1855. (2) When NGC 1117 is treated as being the southern component of IC 1855, PGC is sometime discussed as though part of a triplet with the NGC 1117 and its northern companion (in other words, with the two components of IC 1855). Both of these associations are wrong, but since they exist, it seems appropriate to include this entry as a warning about the error(s).
Physical Information: SIMBAD lists this as a galaxy, but GAIA lists it as a star, and its parallax and proper motion confirm that identification; and in the PanSTARRS image of IC 1855 (which see for images) it certainly looks like a star, so it is an object in our own galaxy, and has nothing to do with the other galaxies.

PGC 1431167 (almost certainly not
IC 1855)
Per modern misidentifications, supposedly observed (Jan 7, 1896) by Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Aries (RA 02 49 04.3, Dec +13 26 35)
and if it were IC 1855, plus a magnitude 12.0 star about 20 arcsec to its south
Historical Misidentification: Per Dreyer, IC 1855 (Javelle #958, 1860 RA 02 41 37, NPD 77 13.2) is "faint, pretty large, double north south, binuclear." The position precesses to RA 02 49 16.0, Dec +13 21 55, but there is nothing there, and based on a comment by Corwin, was plucked from the sky as simply the closest object that might be IC 1855, on the basis of the fact that the galaxy and the magnitude 12.0 star to its south more or less match the description, and although 5.5 arcmin north-northwest of the IC2 position, they are the only thing near that position that could be what Javelle saw. However, although as a result of Corwin's decades-old decision NED lists PGC 1431167 as IC 1855, he now agrees that it is almost certainly not IC 1855, and although a search of LEDA for IC 1855 returns a page for PGC 1431167, it does not state that the galaxy is the IC object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8400 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1431167 is about 390 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 375 to 380 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 385 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 60 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 1431167, often misidentified as IC 1855
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 1431167, also with a box showing the IC 1855 position
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy and the nearby star supposedly belonging to the IC object
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1431167, often misidentified as IC 1855

IC 1856
(= PGC 10647 = UGC 2291 = CGCG 389-021 = MCG +00-08-021)

Discovered (Jan 24, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Cetus (RA 02 48 50.8, Dec -00 46 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1856 (Javelle #959, 1860 RA 02 41 42, NPD 91 19.5) is "faint, small, extended 200°, gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1857
(= PGC 10715 = UGC 2312 = CGCG 440-016 = MCG +02-08-013)

Discovered (Jan 7, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Aries (RA 02 49 38.9, Dec +14 37 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1857 (Javelle #960, 1860 RA 02 41 57, NPD 75 57.7) is "faint, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1858
(= PGC 10671 = ESO 416-029 = MCG -05-07-033)

Discovered (Sep 5, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Fornax (RA 02 49 08.4, Dec -31 17 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1858 (Swift list XI (#45), 1860 RA 02 42 49, NPD 121 52.6) is "very faint, pretty small, round, 1st of 3," the others being IC 1859 and 1860.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1859
(= PGC 10665 = PGC 199007 = ESO 416-028 = MCG -05-07-032)

Discovered (Sep 5, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Fornax (RA 02 49 03.9, Dec -31 10 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1859 (Swift list XI (#46), 1860 RA 02 42 51, NPD 121 46.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, 2nd of 3," the others being IC 1858 and 1860.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?
Note About Possible Companion: There is an object listed as a possible companion at RA 02 49 02.0, Dec -31 10 46 (just off the southwestern arm of IC 1859), but per GAIA, it is only a magnitude 15.1 star.

IC 1860
(= PGC 10707 = ESO 416-031 = MCG -05-07-035)

Discovered (Sep 5, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.7 elliptical galaxy (type E4??) in Fornax (RA 02 49 33.9, Dec -31 11 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1860 (Swift list XI (#47), 1860 RA 02 43 23, NPD 121 46.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, a little extended, 3rd of 3," the others being IC 1858 and 1859.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.7 arcmin?
RIDE 97.7 - 93.8 Mpc, E4, 3K Vr 6705 km/sec

PGC 74219
(= MCG -05-07-036)

Not an IC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
IC 1860
A magnitude ? galaxy (type SB0/a? S0?) in Fornax (RA 02 49 33.0, Dec -31 11 57)
Physical Information: V 15g, 3K Vr 7315 km/sec, RIDE1 107.0 Mpc, z 0.0244035
600 km/sec recessional velocity difference means possibly member of the cluster containing IC 1860, but almost certainly not a companion of that particular galaxy

IC 1861
(= PGC 10905 = UGC 2357 = CGCG 484-023 = MCG +04-07-028)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 02 53 07.0, Dec +25 29 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1861 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 45 08, NPD 65 05.8) is "faint, pretty small, round, very gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1862
(= PGC 10858 = ESO 356-015 = MCG -06-07-010)

Discovered (Nov 25, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Fornax (RA 02 51 58.7, Dec -33 20 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1862 (Swift list XI (#48), 1860 RA 02 45 31, NPD 123 56.8) is "most extremely faint, very small, a little extended, very difficult, 7th magnitude star south-following (to the southeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1863
(= PGC 10997 = CGCG 415-024 = MCG +01-08-015)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cetus (RA 02 54 50.7, Dec +08 47 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1863 (Javelle #961, 1860 RA 02 47 22, NPD 81 48.4) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1864
(= PGC 10925 = ESO 356-017 = MCG -06-07-011)

Discovered (Oct 19, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 11.6 elliptical galaxy (type E4??) in Fornax (RA 02 53 39.3, Dec -34 11 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1864 (Swift list XI (#49), 1860 RA 02 47 27, NPD 124 46.8) is "extremely faint, small, round."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1865
(= PGC 11035 = UGC 2391 = CGCG 415-026 = MCG +01-08-017)

Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Cetus (RA 02 55 20.2, Dec +08 49 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1865 (Javelle #962, 1860 RA 02 47 51, NPD 81 45.7) is "faint, very small, gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 1866
(= PGC 10992 = MCG -03-08-044)

Discovered (Jan 31, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Eridanus (RA 02 54 53.0, Dec -15 39 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1866 (Howe list III (#9), 1860 RA 02 48 19, NPD 106 13.4) is "very faint, extremely small, almost stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1867
(= PGC 11070 = UGC 2400 = CGCG 415-029 = MCG +01-08-019)

Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cetus (RA 02 55 52.2, Dec +09 18 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1867 (Javelle #963, 1860 RA 02 48 21, NPD 81 14.5) is "faint, small, pretty round, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.2 arcmin?

IC 1868
(= "PGC 3091399")

Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cetus (RA 02 56 05.8, Dec +09 22 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1865 (Javelle #964, 1860 RA 02 48 38, NPD 81 13.4) is "faint, very small, round, stellar."
Note About PGC Designation: A HyperLEDA search for IC 1868 states that there is no entry for that object, but returns a page for the galaxy listed above, listed as PGC 3091399; however, a search of the database for that PGC designation returns no result, so it is placed in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1869
(= PGC 11224 = CGCG 415-044)

Discovered (Dec 14, 1903) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cetus (RA 02 58 11.7, Dec +05 50 12)
Does Corwin's position (2 58 11.9, +5 50 16) include the magnitude 15.0 star 'attached' ne?
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1869 (Javelle #965, 1860 RA 02 50 46, NPD 84 43.6) is "faint, extremely small, like nebulous double star."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin? Note About Possible Companion: There is an object listed as a possible companion at RA 02 58 10.3, Dec +05 50 21 (just off the northwestern arm of IC 1869), but per GAIA, it is only a magnitude 16.1 star. (Corwin lists that as a "comp", and the ne star as a star)

IC 1870
(= PGC 11202 = UGCA 46 = MCG -01-08-020)

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBm??) in Eridanus (RA 02 57 52.9, Dec -02 20 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1870 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 50 48, NPD 92 53.6) is "very faint, round, very gradually brighter middle, very difficult."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 1.6 arcmin?

IC 1871
(= "PGC 3518578")

Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
An emission nebula in Cassiopeia (RA 02 57 18, Dec +60 39 54)
Corwin lists a northern component (or companion?) at RA 02 57 04.5, Dec +60 44 12
Steinicke lists IC 1871 as LBN 675 at RA 02 57 21.7, Dec +60 40 20
Historical Identification: IC 1871 (Barnard, 1860 RA 02 55 17, NPD 29 52.2) is "a 9.3 magnitude nebulous star, chiefly following (nebulosity mostly to the east of the star)."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the HyperLEDA database for IC 1871 returns a page for a region in the emission nebula to the east of the star mentioned above, listed as PGC 3518578; however, a search of the database for the PGC designation returns no result, so it is placed in quotes.
Physical Information:

IC 1872
Recorded (February, 1891) by
Friedrich Bidschof
A magnitude 15? group of four stars in Perseus (RA 03 04 34.0, Dec +42 48 38)
Corwin cautions that this is not NGC 1174, presumably just in case someone suggests that in the future, no one seeming to have made such a claim to date. He also gives positions for all FIVE stars:
RA 03 04 33.9, Dec +42 48 37
RA 03 04 34.8, Dec +42 48 34
RA 03 04 33.6, Dec +42 48 40
RA 03 04 35.2, Dec +42 48 44
RA 03 04 32.7, Dec +42 48 34
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1872 (Bidschof ([A.N.] 3520 (#16)), 1860 RA 02 55 23, NPD 47 44.4) is "a cluster."
Note About Lack Of PGC Designation: A search of the HyperLEDA database for IC 1872 returns no result, which is hardly surprising given the nature of the object.
Physical Information:

IC 1873
(= PGC 11541 = CGCG 415-057 = MCG +01-08-039)

Discovered (Jan 29, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Cetus (RA 03 03 52.9, Dec +09 36 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1873 (Javelle #966, 1860 RA 02 56 18, NPD 81 01.7) is "faint, small, extended 200°."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin? Perhaps accompanied by a magnitude 16.0 compact galaxy just southwest of its nucleus, but given the somewhat distorted appearance of its nucleus, that may simply be a star-forming region within the galaxy.

IC 1874
(= PGC 11652 = CGCG 524-050 = MCG +06-07-039)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Perseus (RA 03 06 22.0, Dec +36 00 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1874 (Javelle #967, 1860 RA 02 57 35, NPD 54 31.8) is "faint, very small, very little brighter middle, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1875
(= PGC 11549 = ESO 300-006 = MCG -07-07-002)

Discovered (Sep 29, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0??) in Fornax (RA 03 03 56.7, Dec -39 26 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1875 (Swift list XI (#50), 1860 RA 02 57 56, NPD 130 02.1) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, faint double star south-following (to the southeast) in line."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?
Apparent Companion?: Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 598322) at (RA 03 03 59.20, Dec -39 25 31.1)
LEDA B 16.1 +/- .5, SIMBAD B 13.5, NED 16.6g, .46 x .30 arcmin, but no Vr anywhere, so whether an actual companion is unknown

IC 1876
(= PGC 11577 = ESO 417-013 = MCG -05-08-013)

Discovered (Sep 16, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Fornax (RA 03 04 32.3, Dec -27 27 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1876 (Swift list XI (#51), 1860 RA 02 58 37, NPD 118 02.1) is "most extremely faint, small, round, faint star near south-following (to the southeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin?

IC 1877
(= PGC 11495 = ESO 199-011)

Discovered (Dec 5, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Horologium (RA 03 03 09.6, Dec -50 30 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1877 (DeLisle Stewart #165, 1860 RA 02 58 44, NPD 141 03) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 170°, probably nebulous."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1878
(= PGC 11528 = part of ESO 199-013, the other part being
PGC 11525)
Discovered (Dec 5, 1899) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6? spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)ab) in Horologium (RA 03 03 40.2, Dec -52 06 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1878 (DeLisle Stewart #166, 1860 RA 02 59 22, NPD 142 39) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 5°, probably nebulous." Per Corwin, Stewart's description makes it clear that IC 1878 consists of only the barred spiral listed above, and that he did not observe its fainter companion (PGC 11525), for if he had, he would have almost certainly written "much extended 45°±"; but some references include that galaxy as part of the IC entry, so it is discussed immediately below.
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the HyperLEDA database returns the pair of galaxies listed here and in the following entry, identified as ESO 199-013 = "PGC 3166747"; however, a search of the database for that PGC designation returns no result, hence its being in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.65 arcmin (counting the outer ring). (Note: Although images suggest that the two galaxies may be companions, IC 1878 is nearly twice as distant as PGC 11525, so they are merely an optical double.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1878, also showing PGC 11525, which is sometimes mistakenly included in IC 1878; also shown is  IC 1879
Above, a 12 arcmin DSS image centered on IC 1878, also showing PGC 11525 and IC 1879
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 1878 and PGC 11525
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1878, also showing PGC 11525, which is sometimes mistakenly included in IC 1878

PGC 11525 (not part of
IC 1878)
(= PGC 11526 = PGC 11531 = part of ESO 199-013 (with PGC 11528)

Not an IC object but listed here since sometimes mistakenly considered part of IC 1878
A magnitude 15.2? spiral galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 03 43.4, Dec -52 06 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images at IC 1878). (See IC 1878 for images and a discussion of its erroneous inclusion in that entry.) Note: Although the closeup image suggests that the two galaxies may be interacting (and Corwin lists it as an apparent companion), IC 1878 is nearly twice as distant as PGC 11525, so they are merely an optical double.

IC 1879
(= PGC 11542 = ESO 199-014)

Discovered (Dec 5, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Horologium (RA 03 03 52.4, Dec -52 07 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1879 (DeLisle Stewart #167, 1860 RA 02 59 34, NPD 142 39) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 135°, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.2 arcmin? (For now, see IC 1878 for a wide-field image.)

IC 1880
(= PGC 11656 = MCG -02-08-049)

Discovered (Jan 30, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Eridanus (RA 03 06 28.5, Dec -09 43 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1880 (Howe list III (#10), 1860 RA 02 59 42, NPD 100 16.3) is "extremely faint, small, 9th magnitude star following (to the east) 8 seconds of time."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 1881 (=
NGC 1213)
(= PGC 11789 = UGC 2557 = CGCG 524-058 = MCG +06-07-045)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1213)
Discovered (Jan 10, 1891) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1881)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)dm) in Perseus (RA 03 09 17.3, Dec +38 38 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1881 (Bigourdan #253, 1860 RA 03 00 20, NPD 51 52) is "very faint, pretty small, very diffuse [? = 1213]", the question at the end indicating a suspicion that this was actually NGC 1213. The position precesses to RA 03 09 17.3, Dec +38 40 22, less than two arcmin north of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. As noted in the entry for NGC 1213, Swift's right ascension was so poor that it was almost inevitable that a later "discovery" would be made, but at least Bigourdan did recognize the possibility that his observation was a rediscovery of Swift's object.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1213 for anything else.

IC 1882
(= PGC 11718 = UGC 2551 = CGCG 390-003 = MCG +00-09-002)

Discovered (Jan 29, 1894) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in Cetus (RA 03 07 49.3, Dec +03 08 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1882 (Javelle #968, 1860 RA 03 00 33, NPD 87 23.4) is "faint, pretty large, extended 210°."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1883 (=
NGC 1212)
(= PGC 11815 = UGC 2560)

Discovered (Oct 18, 1884) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1212)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1883)
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Perseus (RA 03 09 42.2, Dec +40 53 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1883 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 00 35, NPD 49 38.8) is "small, round, very gradually brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 03 09 41.3, Dec +40 53 50, on the western edge of the galaxy, so the identification is certain. As noted at the entry for NGC 1212 (which see for anything other than historical information), Swift's position was so poor that a later "discovery" was almost inevitable, and in this case the equality of the two entries wasn't recognized until fairly recently.
Note About PGC Designation: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1883 states that no such entry exists, but does lead to the page for the object listed here; however, since the realization that IC 1883 is the same as NGC 1212 is so recent, the page doesn't mention that possibility.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1212 for anything else.

IC 1884 (=
IC 290)
(= PGC 11817 = UGC 2561 = CGCG 540-047)

Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 290)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1884)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Perseus (RA 03 09 42.7, Dec +40 58 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1884 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 00 36, NPD 49 33.8) is "small, extended north-preceding south-following (northwest-southeast), difficult, 12th magnitude star close following (to the east)."
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 290 for anything else.

IC 1885
(= PGC 11665 = ESO 357-003)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Fornax (RA 03 06 40.4, Dec -32 51 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1885 (DeLisle Stewart #168, 1860 RA 03 00 58, NPD 123 23) is "very faint, very small, much extended 140°, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1886
(= PGC 11724 = MCG -01-09-001)

Discovered (Dec 9, 1893) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Eridanus (RA 03 08 03.2, Dec -04 24 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1886 (Bigourdan #254, 1860 RA 03 01 03, NPD 94 56) is "very faint, small, very much brighter middle, 13th magnitude star 1.2 arcmin south."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.7 arcmin?

PGC 145287
Not an IC object but listed here because an apparent companion of
IC 1886
A magnitude 17.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 08 07.0, Dec -04 24 41)
Physical Information:
NED 3K Vr 11015 km/sec, 17.6g, .38 x .25 arcmin, z 0.03674857386
This recessional velocity is far greater than the 3K Vr of 8435 km/sec for IC 1886, so the two are an optical double.

IC 1887 (=
IC 292)
(= PGC 11846 = UGC 2567 = CGCG 540-049 = MCG +07-07-030)

Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 292)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1887)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sd??) in Perseus (RA 03 10 12.9, Dec +40 45 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1887 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 01 04, NPD 49 46.8) has "a 12th magnitude star close south-following (to the southeast)."
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 292 for aanything else.

IC 1888 (=
IC 293)
(= PGC 11873 = CGCG 540-053 = MCG +07-07-031)

Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 293)
Discovered (1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1888)
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 10 56.1, Dec +41 08 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1888 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 01 51, NPD 49 24.3) is "very faint, small."
Physical Information: Given the suplicate entry, see IC 293 for anything else.

IC 1889 (=
IC 294 = IC 296 = IC 295?)
(= PGC 11878 = UGC 2574 = CGCG 540-054 = MCG +07-07-033)

Corwin only equates IC 1889 with IC 294 & 296, not IC 295; need to check those entries
Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 294)
Discovered (Sep 11, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 295)
Recorded (Sep 14, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 296)
"Discovered" (late 1890's?) by Edward Barnard (and later listed as IC 1889)
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Perseus (RA 03 11 03.1, Dec +40 37 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1889 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 01 55, NPD 49 55.4) is "faint, round, very gradually brighter middle."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1889 returns no result, but leads to the page for IC 294, which as shown above is one of the duplicate entries for the galaxy listed above.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 294 for anything else.

IC 1890
(= PGC 11837 = CGCG 464-005 = MCG +03-09-004)

Discovered (Dec 27, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Aries (RA 03 09 58.4, Dec +19 12 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1890 (Javelle #969, 1860 RA 03 02 03, NPD 71 20.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, irregular figure, nuclear, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1891
(= PGC 1598762)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Aries (RA 03 10 12.0, Dec +19 36 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1891 (Javelle #970, 1860 RA 03 02 14, NPD 70 55.7) is "very faint, small, brighter middle, diffuse."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the HyperLEDA database for IC 1891 states that there is no such entry, but does lead to the page for PGC 1598762, the galaxy listed above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

WORKING HERE: Need to complete this entry (and all the others for Arp 332) with far better images
IC 1892 (with
NGC 1228, 1229 and 1230 = Arp 332)
(= PGC 11750 = UGCA 55 = ESO 480-036 = MCG -04-08-030)

Discovered (Jan 22, 1900) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)d? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 08 27.2, Dec -23 03 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1892 (Howe list III (#11), 1860 RA 03 02 15, NPD 113 35.6) is "very faint, large, near (NGC) 1230." The position precesses to RA 03 08 26.9, Dec -23 03 18, barely west of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Historical Misidentification: Some references mistakenly list IC 1892 as a pair of galaxies, including the faint galaxy to the north of PGC 11750 (namely, PGC 11748) as part of the IC designation; but neither Howe's paper nor the IC description give any indication that this could be correct, and although the latter galaxy could be called an apparent companion, as it turns out (and is discussed in the linked entry) it is about four times further away from us than IC 1892, so there is no connection between IC 1892 and its "companion" in any way whatsoever.
Usage By The Arp Atlas: IC 1892 is one of a group of galaxies used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a chain of galaxies, with the remark "Different types of galaxies in chain.". Rather oddly, only IC 1892 is mentioned on the page showing the names and positions of the galaxies involved, but the plate clearly shows all four of the galaxies listed above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1 arcmin? LEDA: SBb, B 13.8; NED RIDE 34.8 - 37.8 Mpc, SB(s)d? pec, 1.9 x 1.0 arcmin, 3K Vr 2726 km/sec
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1892, also showing NGC 1230 and part of NGC 1229
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on IC 1892, also showing NGC 1230 and part of NGC 1229
(Many imaging artifacts removed above and below, but for IC 1892, not very successfully)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 1230, and therefore on Arp 332
PanSTARRS image of region near NGC 1228, NGC 1229, NGC 1230 and IC 1892, which comprise Arp 332
Below, a ? arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of Arp 332, with the labels removed
PanSTARRS image of region near NGC 1228, NGC 1229, NGC 1230 and IC 1892, which comprise Arp 332
Below, a ? arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of IC 1892 and its optical double, PGC 11748
(badly compromised areas of PGC 11748 partially combined with a DSS image to reduce the worst artifacts)


PGC 11748 (not part of
IC 1892)
(= MCG -04-08-029)

Not an IC object but listed here because sometimes mistakenly listed as part of IC 1892
A magnitude 16(?) galaxy (type ?) in Eridanus (RA 03 08 25.6, Dec -23 02 13)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for IC 1892, PGC 11748 is sometimes listed as part of that entry; but there is nothing in the historical record to justify that, so the most that the smaller galaxy could be listed as is an apparent companion.
Physical Properties:
LEDA Sb, B 16.4; NED: 16g, .4 x .15 arcmin, 3K Vr 10502 km/sec, z 0.0350306438

IC 1893
(= PGC 1599154)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Aries (RA 03 10 16.6, Dec +19 37 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1893 (Javelle #971, 1860 RA 03 02 19, NPD 70 54.9) is "extremely faint, very small, difficult."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the HyperLEDA database for IC 1893 returns no result; however, a search for PGC 1599154 returns the page for the galaxy listed above, and so does a searach of NED for IC 1893.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2 by 0.1 arcmin?

IC 1894
(= PGC 11857 = CGCG 464-006)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Aries (RA 03 10 25.5, Dec +19 36 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1894 (Javelle #972, 1860 RA 03 02 28, NPD 70 55.6) is "faint, small, very little brighter middle, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1895
(= PGC 11807 = ESO 481-001 = MCG -04-08-033)

Discovered (Oct 8, 1896) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Fornax (RA 03 09 36.2, Dec -25 15 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1895 (Swift list XI (#52), 1860 RA 03 03 24, NPD 115 51.8) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, 2 stars close preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin?

IC 1896
(= PGC 11722 = ESO 155-004)

Discovered (Dec 5, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Horologium (RA 03 07 52.5, Dec -54 12 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1896 (DeLisle Stewart #169, 1860 RA 03 03 58, NPD 144 46) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 10°, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1897
(= PGC 11866 = MCG -02-09-009)

Discovered (Jan 24, 1900) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SB??) in Eridanus (RA 03 10 45.9, Dec -10 47 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1897 (Howe list III (#12), 1860 RA 03 04 02, NPD 101 19.9) is "extremely faint, very small, near (NGC) 1238."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1898
(= PGC 11851 = UGCA 56 = ESO 481-002 = MCG -04-08-036)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in Eridanus (RA 03 10 20.1, Dec -22 24 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1898 (DeLisle Stewart #170, 1860 RA 03 04 14, NPD 112 56) is "a nebulous line at 60°, suspected."
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1899
(= PGC 11930 = ESO 481-008 = MCG -04-08-041)

Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Fornax (RA 03 12 13.1, Dec -25 18 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1899 (= Swift list XI (#53), 1860 RA 03 05 46, NPD 115 51.2) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 2 faint stars south-preceding (to the southwest) in line." The position precesses to RA 03 11 50.5, Dec -25 19 25. There is nothing at that position, but the galaxy listed above is only 5 arcmin east, and there are two 14th magnitude stars in line with it as described, so the identity is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 6245 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 1899 is about 290 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 75 thousand light-years across.
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1899, also showing probable companion PGC 11938
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on IC 1899, also showing PGC 11938
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 1899

PGC 11938
(= PGC 134020 = MCG -04-08-046)

Not an IC object but listed here as a probable companion of
IC 1899
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type Sm?) in Fornax (RA 03 12 17.6, Dec -25 16 56)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 6215 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 11938 is about 290 million light-years away (and for all practical purposes, at essentially the same distance as IC 1899, making them probable companions). Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about ? thousand light-years across.
*Add PanSTARRS images here*
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1800 - 1849) ←IC Objects: IC 1850 - 1899→ (IC 1900 - 1949)