Celestial Atlas
(IC 1850 - 1899) ←IC Objects: IC 1900 - 1949 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 1950 - 1999)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916,
1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933,
1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949

Page last updated July 26, 2021
Replaced my estimates of galaxy types for IC 1908 with ones from an expert
WORKING: Replace current images for IC 1923(??)/1949/48 with better ones
Added Spitzer S4G types for those listed as IC 1900-1949
Checked updated Corwin positions, Dreyer entries, updated formatting and designations
NEXT: Precess Dreyer positions, ID where possible, add/update pix

IC 1900
(= PGC 12124 = CGCG 525-013 = MCG +06-08-007)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Perseus (RA 03 15 55.2, Dec +37 09 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1900 (Javelle #973, 1860 RA 03 07 01, NPD 53 22.2) is "faint, small, pretty round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1901
(= PGC 12136 = CGCG 525-014 = MCG +06-08-008)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Perseus (RA 03 16 02.6, Dec +37 06 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1901 (Javelle #974, 1860 RA 03 07 09, NPD 53 24.7) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1902
(= PGC 12150 = CGCG 525-015)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a??) in Perseus (RA 03 16 12.4, Dec +37 10 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1902 (Javelle #975, 1860 RA 03 07 18, NPD 53 20.8) is "faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle equal to 14th magnitude star."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1903
(= ESO 100-024)
(= PGC 11990 (= PGC 465081) + PGC 11986 (= PGC 465232))

(The ESO entry includes both galaxies, just as the IC entry does)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A pair of galaxies in Horologium (RA 03 13 10.5, Dec -50 34 12)
PGC 11990 = A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) at RA 03 13 12.6, Dec -50 34 39
PGC 11986= A magnitude 15.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) at RA 03 13 08.5, Dec -50 33 45
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1903 (DeLisle Stewart #171, 1860 RA 03 08 46, NPD 141 07) "2 faint nebulae, extended." The position precesses to RA 03 13 06.2, Dec -50 35 32, less than 1.5 arcmin southwest of the pair of galaxies listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Note About PGC Designation: HyperLEDA ignores the fact that Stewart's paper said two faint nebulae, and only includes PGC 11990 in its entry for IC 1903; however, the individual pages for the two PGC designations do show the correct objects.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 14835 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 11990 is about 690 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 650 to 655 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 685 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below), PGC 11990 is about 130 thousand light-years across.
 No reference seems to have any information about PGC 11986 that can't be determined directly from the images below (e.g., its apparent size is about 0.45 by 0.15 arcmin). So whether it is in any way related to PGC 11990 other than being part of IC 1903 cannot be known; but if (and that should be a very big "if") it is at about the same distance and they are actually "companions", then it would span about 85 thousand light-years. However, since its actual distance is unknown, and it could be much closer to us or further from us than its apparent companion, its actual size is also unknown.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies PGC 11986 and PGC 11990, which comprise IC 1903
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 11986 and 11990, which comprise IC 1903
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the apparent pair
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 11986 and spiral galaxy PGC 11990, which comprise IC 1903

IC 1904
(= PGC 12079 = ESO 417-022 = MCG -05-08-024)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Fornax (RA 03 15 00.8, Dec -30 42 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1904 (DeLisle Stewart #172, 1860 RA 03 09 09, NPD 121 13) is "extremely faint, very small, much extended 80°, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1905
Recorded (Nov 14, 1884) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A triple star in Perseus (RA 03 18 48.2, Dec +41 21 56)
Per Corwin, there is a fourth star a bit to the side, but Bigourdan's position is "off" in the opposite direction, so the IC entry probably belongs only to the triplet. However, he lists positions for all four stars:
RA 03 18 48.9, Dec +41 21 51
RA 03 18 48.2, Dec +41 22 10
RA 03 18 49.6, Dec +41 21 20
RA 03 18 47.3, Dec +41 21 47
Corwin also lists a less likely "candidate" at RA 03 18 48.5, De +41 21 47
Note About Lack Of PGC Designation: As might be expected for a catalog of galaxies, HyperLEDA does not have an entry for IC 1905, and a search for that designation returns no result. The oddity is that in most cases, LEDA does have entries for such things if they are NGC/IC "objects", even when the entries contain no useful information.
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1905 (Bigourdan #374, 1860 RA 03 09 34, NPD 49 09) is "a cluster, small, very faint, nebulous?"
Physical Information:

IC 1906
(= PGC 12138 = ESO 357-011 = MCG -06-08-001)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Fornax (RA 03 16 05.7, Dec -34 21 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1906 (DeLisle Stewart #173, 1860 RA 03 10 31, NPD 124 53) is "very faint, very small, very much extended 60°, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1907 (=
NGC 1278)
(= PGC 12438 = UGC 2670 = CGCG 540-105 = MCG +07-07-065)

Discovered (Feb 14, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 1278)
Discovered (Oct 22, 1884) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 1907)
A magnitude 12.4 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Perseus (RA 03 19 54.1, Dec +41 33 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1907 (Bigourdan #375, 1860 RA 03 10 40, NPD 48 58) is "very faint, small, very much brighter middle."
Discovery Note and PGC Misidentification: Per Corwin, Bigourdan originally thought he had found a new nebula (because of an error in Lord Rosse's catalog); but he realized that his #375 was the same as NGC 1278 while preparing his own catalog, so the equality of the two objects has been known for more than a century. Despite that, LEDA misidentifies PGC 12405 as IC 1907, and some other references follow its lead, hence the warning in the entry immediately below.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1278 for anything else.

PGC 12405 (not =
IC 1907)
(= CGCG 540-101 = MCG +07-07-061)

Not an IC object but listed here because sometimes misidentified as IC 1907
A magnitude 14.2 galaxy (type S0??) in Perseus (RA 03 19 34.2, Dec +41 34 49)
PGC Misidentification: As noted in the entry for IC 1907, Bigourdan realized that his discovery of what became IC 1907 was actually a rediscovery of NGC 1278, more than a century ago; but despite that, LEDA misidentifies IC 1907 as PGC 12405, so this entry is placed here as a warning about that mistake.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1908
(= ESO 155-013)
(= PGC 12085 + PGC 12086)

Discovered (Dec 5, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A pair of galaxies in Horologium (RA 03 15 05.4, Dec -54 49 14)
PGC 12085 = A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc pec) at RA 03 15 05.1, Dec -54 49 08
PGC 12086 = A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type (SB(r)c? pec) at RA 03 15 05.6, Dec -54 49 20
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1908 (DeLisle Stewart #174, 1860 RA 03 11 18, NPD 145 21) is "very faint, very small, spiral branch." The position precesses to RA 03 15 08.1, Dec -54 49 53, a position just south of the pair listed above, and the description is perfect, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Note: As Corwin notes, the northwestern component of this interacting pair has two spiral arms, but since they are fainter than its companion, what Stewart thought was a spiral branch may have been the second galaxy, and only an examination of the original plate could help decide the best interpretation of his description.
PGC Designations: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1908 only returns a page for PGC 12085; but a separate search for PGC 12086 also returns a page, even though that doesn't show that it is part of IC 1908.
Physical Information: No recessional velocity appears to be available for the southeastern member of this interacting pair of galaxies (PGC 12086), but since they are interacting, they must be at the same distance, so the recessional velocity of the northwestern member (PGC 12085) can serve as the Hubble Flow distance indicator for both of them.
 Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8230 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 12085 (and therefore IC 1908) is about 380 to 385 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 370 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 380 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.25 by 0.85 arcmin for the main galaxy and about 2.05 by 1.15 for its extended "arms" (from the images below), the northwestern member of the pair's central structure is about 135 thousand light-years across and its distended arms span about 220 thousand light-years, while the apparent size of about 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin (also from the images below) for the southeastern member suggests that it spans about 25 to 30 thousand light-years. The exceptional brightness of the smaller galaxy (badly overexposed in the first HST image) is undoubtedly caused by exceptionally rapid formation of hot, bright young stars in its central regions; and I feel certain that further study would classify it as a starburst galaxy.
Note About Classification: Both galaxies are severely perturbed by their interaction, and certainly deserve "pec" types. The classifications above are by Harold Corwin (based on the images shown below), who states that seeing a ring in a galaxy as perturbed as the smaller one is very unusual, and that he isn't at all sure about the "c", hence the question mark. I'm happy (and in some ways surprised) to be able to say that my classifications weren't much different, though particularly for the smaller galaxy were too complex to be justified by the images; but he writes that the smaller galaxy reminds him of when Halton Arp was working on his catalog of peculiar southern galaxies, and gave him advice about such things, namely "Be humble." This is a case where you can't be anything else, which is why I reached out to him.
DSS image of region near the pair of spiral galaxies listed as IC 1908
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1908
Below, a 2.2 by 2.4 arcmin wide image of the pair (Image Credit William Keel, Ray White III, CTIO; used by permission)
CTIO image of the pair of spiral galaxies listed as IC 1908
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide image of the pair, emphasizing the structure of PGC 12085
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, William Keel; orientation and post-processing by Courtney Seligman)
HST image of the pair of spiral galaxies listed as IC 1908, emphasizing the structure of PGC 12085
Below, a 0.2 arcmin wide image, emphasizing the outer structure of PGC 12086
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, overlay by Courtney Seligman on portion of image above)
HST image of spiral galaxy PGC 12086
Below, a 0.2 arcmin wide image, emphasizing the inner structure of PGC 12086
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, same overlay as above but with different transparency)
HST image of spiral galaxy PGC 12086

IC 1909
(= PGC 12212 = PGC 672856 = ESO 357-014 = MCG -06-08-003)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Fornax (RA 03 17 20.0, Dec -33 41 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1909 (DeLisle Stewart #175, 1860 RA 03 11 42, NPD 124 12) is "very faint, very small, considerably extended 45°, stellar nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1910
Recorded (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 03 17 55.7, Dec -21 26 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1910 (DeLisle Stewart #176, 1860 RA 03 11 43, NPD 111 57) is "2 extremely faint, extremely small nebulae suspected."
Physical Information:

IC 1911
Recorded (Mar 25, 1887) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A lost or nonexistent object in Perseus (RA 03 20 47.4, Dec +35 17 38)
Corwin lists a possible candidate (a magnitude 15.8 star) at RA 03 20 49.4, Dec +35 19 17
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1911 (Bigourdan #258, 1860 RA 03 11 58, NPD 55 13) is "a nebula, not well seen." The position precesses to RA 03 20 47.4, Dec +35 17 38 (whence the position for the "lost" object above), but there is nothing there.
Physical Information:

IC 1912
(= PGC 12172 = ESO 200-001)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Horologium (RA 03 16 43.4, Dec -50 39 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1912 (DeLisle Stewart #177, 1860 RA 03 12 28, NPD 141 10) is "small, extended north-south."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1913
(= PGC 12404 = ESO 357-016 = MCG -05-08-027)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBdm sp) in Fornax (RA 03 19 34.6, Dec -32 27 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1913 (DeLisle Stewart #178, 1860 RA 03 13 53, NPD 122 59) is "very faint, very small, much extended 155°, considerably brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.3 arcmin? Listed as a member (FCC 10) of the Fornax Cluster in Ferguson's Catalog.
Note About Classification: The type is taken from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies.

IC 1914
(= PGC 12390 = ESO 200-003)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)cd) in Horologium (RA 03 19 25.2, Dec -49 35 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1914 (DeLisle Stewart #179, 1860 RA 03 14 45, NPD 140 06) is "a spiral?"
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4 by 1.6 arcmin?
Note About Classification: The type is taken from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies.

IC 1915
(= PGC 12435 = ESO 200-005)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 19 51.9, Dec -50 41 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1915 (DeLisle Stewart #180, 1860 RA 03 15 29, NPD 141 12) is "extended north-south."
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 20160 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1915 is about 935 to 940 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 865 to 870 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 895 to 900 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.57 by 0.48 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 145 thousand light-years across.
Note About Apparent Companion: The spiral galaxy 2MASXJ03200068-5039562 about 2 arcmin to the northeast of IC 1915 is more than 350 million light-years further away from us, and has no connection to it; however, since it might be mistaken for a companion, it is discussed in the following entry.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 1915
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1915, also showing 2MASXJ03200068-5039562
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1915

2MASXJ03200068-5039562 (not a companion of
IC 1915)
(= "PGC 3657216")

Not an IC object but listed here in case anyone makes the mistake of thinking it a possible companion of IC 1915
A magnitude 17(?) galaxy (type SBbc?) in Horologium (RA 03 20 00.7, Dec -50 39 56)
Note About PGC Designation: Although HyperLEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object, a search of the database for that designation returns no result; hence its being placed in quotes.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 29595 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that 2MASXJ03200068-5039562 is about 1375 to 1380 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1230 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1290 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 105 to 110 thousand light-years across.
 As stated in the title for this entry, and in the entry for IC 1915, this galaxy is at least 350 million light-years further away from us than IC 1915, so this entry only serves as a warning to anyone who might be tempted to consider it a possible companion of IC 1915.
Note About The Magnitude: NED lists a magnitude of 17.0, but does not state what wavelength it corresponds to, hence the question mark. It seems fairly reasonable, based on a comparison of its appearance to that of its apparent neighbor, but I wouldn't be surprised to find that it's even fainter, if better information is ever brought to my attention.
DSS image of spiral galaxy 2MASXJ03200068-5039562, a much more distant 'apparent' companion of IC 1915
Above, a 0.75 arcmin wide DSS image of 2MASXJ03200068-5039562; for a wide-field view, see IC 1915

IC 1916
(= PGC 12482 = ESO 200-008)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SB??) in Horologium (RA 03 20 16.5, Dec -49 02 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1916 (DeLisle Stewart #181, 1860 RA 03 15 56, NPD 139 33) is "faint, small, round, 2 stars south-preceding (to the southwest)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1917
(= PGC 100539 = PGC 100540)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Horologium (RA 03 22 12.2, Dec -53 11 03)
Corwin lists positions for four possible companions (all appear to have similar recessional velocities to IC 1917):
north (2MASXJ03221307-5310427 = "PGC 3657942") RA 03 22 13.1, Dec -53 10 43
northeast (2MASXJ03221362-5310547 = "PGC 3657947") RA 03 22 13.7, Dec -53 10 55
south (??) RA 03 22 12.7, Dec -53 11 20
southeast (2MASXJ03221429-5311127 = "PGC 3657952") RA 03 22 14.3, Dec -53 11 12
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1917 (DeLisle Stewart #182, 1860 RA 03 18 16, NPD 143 42) is "extended north-south."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of HyperLEDA does not return a result for IC 1917, but does show several objects near its SIMBAD location, one of which is PGC 100539 (= IC 1917), and three others correspond to 3 of the 4 "companions" listed by Corwin (the "south" companion appears to have no designation anywhere, but I need to do a search in NED and SIMBAD to see if there is SOME kind of designation or any information about it).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1918
(= PGC 12834 = CGCG 416-009)

Discovered (Dec 22, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Taurus (RA 03 26 17.9, Dec +04 32 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1918 (Javelle #976, 1860 RA 03 18 58, NPD 85 57.4) is "faint, small, gradually a little brighter middle, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1919
(= PGC 12825 = ESO 358-001 = MCG -06-08-015)

Discovered (Nov 25, 1897) by
Lewis Swift (XI-54)
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Fornax (RA 03 26 02.2, Dec -32 53 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1919 (Swift list XI (#54), 1860 RA 03 19 49, NPD 123 23.4) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, several stars to north [RA 9 minutes?]," the comment in brackets being a suggestion by Dreyer that the RA was really 03 09 49 (the only additional comment in Swift's paper being "7 or 8 pretty bright stars to north like letter V."
Discovery Note: Dreyer's concern about the right ascension might make sense if there was a well-known (e.g., NGC) object 10 minutes to the west of Swift's position, but there is absolutely nothing of interest near that position, so the reason for that comment is not only unknown, but puzzling.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin? Listed as a member (FCC 43) of the Fornax Cluster in Ferguson's Catalog.

IC 1920
(probably = PGC 74394 = PGC 439794)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type SBa??) in Horologium (RA 03 24 24.4, Dec -52 42 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1920 (DeLisle Stewart #183, 1860 RA 03 20 16, NPD 143 13) is "stellar."
Note About PGC Identification: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1920 does not return the object listed above, but PGC 12715, so that object is discussed immediately below. Normally, such a situation would include a warning that the LEDA identification is wrong, but in this case, Corwin lists PGC 12715 as an unlikely but possible alternate candidate for IC 1920, so both entries have to be considered as at least a possibility.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

PGC 12715 (perhaps =
IC 1920)
(= ESO 155-024)

Listed here as an alternate candidate for IC 1920
A magnitude ? galaxy (type Sc?) in Horologium (RA 03 23 59.9, Dec -52 43 27)
Historical (Mis?)identification:
Physical Information:

IC 1921
(not = CD -47° 1297)
(= ESO 200-?012)

Recorded (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
Probably a lost or nonexistent object in Horologium (RA 03 24 41.9, Dec -50 42 20), or
Perhaps a magnitude 16.6 star at RA 03 24 44.2, Dec -50 41 24
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1921 (DeLisle Stewart #184, 1860 RA 03 20 30, NPD 141 12) is "stellar." The position precesses to RA 03 24 41.9, Dec -50 42 20 (whence the position above), but there is nothing of interest either there or anywhere near there. Corwin points out that the star listed above is less than an arcmin north-northeast of the IC position, so it as likely a correct identification of IC 1921 as anything else could be, but he feels that it is probably too faint to have been mistaken for a nebular object, even with the description "stellar", and suspects that it might be a plate defect. However, whether that star is IC 1921 or not, there is a certainly incorrect and unfortunately very common misidentification of IC 1921, as stated in the following paragraph.
Historical Misidentification: Many websites misidentify IC 1921 as high-proper motion star CD -47° 1297, but its J2000 position is RA 04 11 43.0, Dec -47 16 16, and even though it is a high-proper motion star, it was at least 3 degrees north and 3 degrees east of Stewart's position in 1898, so it cannot possibly be IC 1921; hence the warning about that misidentification in the title of this entry. (The ESO 200-?012 is not an error, but a placeholder used by ESO for objects that can't be found; it therefore has no connection to the misidentification as CD -47° 1297, except that it shows up as one of the IDs on sites that misidentify the object.)
Note About PGC Designation: Although HyperLEDA assigns a PGC designation for most NGC/IC objects regardless of their nature, in this case a search of the database returns a message stating that IC 1921 is not in the database, so neither is any PGC designation. However, given the almost universal misidentification of IC 1921, that's probably the best possible result of such a search.

IC 1922
(= PGC 12749 = ESO 200-013)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 16.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Horologium (RA 03 24 43.0, Dec -50 44 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1922 (DeLisle Stewart #185, 1860 RA 03 20 30, NPD 141 14) is "stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1923
(= PGC 465294?), or
PGC 12753 (which see)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Sa?? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 24 53.1, Dec -50 33 20)
Historical (Mis?)Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1923 (DeLisle Stewart #186, 1860 RA 03 20 36, NPD 141 04) is "stellar." The position precesses to RA 03 24 48.7, Dec -50 34 21, about 1.2 arcmin southwest of PGC 465294. If that galaxy were more obviously "nebular", its identification as IC 1923 would be more certain; but although it is the only galaxy in the region that fits the description, "stellar" could just as easily fit any of the stars in the vicinity, such as the one only about 0.6 arcmin southwest of the IC position. So although the identification of IC 1923 as that galaxy is a common one, if a print of the original plate ever becomes available, it may turn out that what Stewart marked on the plate was a completely different object.
Problems With The Identification: J0324518-0503321, the magnitude 16.8 star just west of the galaxy listed above, is sometimes stated as being part of IC 1923. However, if that were true, Stewart should have added "extended preceding-following (west-east)" to his description. The problem is that on his measurements of this plate (the first one he measured), he didn't bother with detailed descriptions, so there is no way to say whether the star should be included in the identification, or not. NED includes the star on its page for IC 1923, listing the object as a pair of galaxies, with the caveat that the western component might be a star in our own galaxy (which, per GAIA, is the actual situation). Because NED lists the star as a galaxy, it shows an apparent size for IC 1923 that includes the star.
 This problem with Stewart's description also leads to an alternate candidate (PGC 12753), as shown in the following entry. That galaxy is presumably ruled out by the fact that it is obviously "extended north-south," but the argument above, ruling out the star to the west of PGC 465294, can also be used to justify the alternate candidate, and in fact it is the one listed as IC 1923 in HyperLEDA. So which, if either, of the two "candidates" is actually IC 1923 will only be determined, as noted above, if and when the actual plate or a print made from it is examined.
Physical Information: There appear to be no data available for this galaxy, other than its position, apparent size and B-magnitude (the V-magnitude in the description line is, as indicated by a question mark, an estimate based on magnitudes at other bandwidths). So all that can be said about the object is that it has an apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below); but since we can't be sure that it is even what Stewart observed, this lack of information is one of the least of our concerns.
DSS image of region near galaxy PGC 465294 and foreground star J0324518-503321, which in one way or another comprise IC 1923
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1923, and the star that might be part of that designation
Also shown is PGC 12753, the other galaxy commonly listed as IC 1923
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 465294 and the nearby star
DSS image of galaxy PGC 465294 and foreground star J0324518-503321, which in one way or another comprise IC 1923

PGC 12753 (=
IC 1923?)
(= ESO 200-014)

One of at least two candidates for IC 1923 (see the entry above for another)
A magnitude 16(?) spiral(?) galaxy (type S?) in Horologium (RA 03 24 48.3, Dec -50 36 23)
Historical (Mis?)Identification: Although NED and many other references list PGC 465294 as IC 1923, LEDA lists PGC 12753 as that object, instead. Using the IC position, Stewart's object supposedly lay at (2000) RA 03 24 48.7, Dec -50 34 21, which is only about 1.9 arcmin due north of PGC 12753, and the only reason that galaxy doesn't seem like a good candidate is that it is obviously extended north-south, and Stewart's description is simply "stellar". But as noted in the entry for PGC 465294, that doesn't necessarily mean anything, as it is quite possible that on Stewart's plate, PGC 465294 and the faint star to its west could easily have looked like a nebular object extended east-west, and it may be only the fact that instead of describing things on his plate (the first one he measured) in any detail that led to his writing only "stellar" for numerous objects that were anything but "stellar". So although PGC 465294 is the most frequently listed identification for IC 1923, PGC 12753 is also commonly identified as that object (and is, in fact, listed that way in the HyperLEDA database). So until a print of Stewart's plate (or the plate itself) can be examined, the actual identity of IC 1923 will not be known with any certainty, and PGC 12753 is probably just as good a candidate as PGC 465294. Still, at least one of the two (and perhaps both) must be a misidentification, and only time will tell which (if either) is actually IC 1923.
Physical Information: As in the case of the other candidate for IC 1923, there is nothing available for this galaxy in the literature, so other than its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), nothing can be said about it.
*Images to be added in the next iteration of this page*

IC 1924
(= PGC 12781 = ESO 200-017)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Horologium (RA 03 25 07.7, Dec -51 42 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1924 (DeLisle Stewart #187, 1860 RA 03 20 56, NPD 142 11) is "extended, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1925 (almost certainly =
IC 1929)
(= PGC 12799 = ESO 200-021)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1925)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1929)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Horologium (RA 03 25 25.8, Dec -51 16 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1925 (DeLisle Stewart #188, 1860 RA 03 21 08, NPD 141 45) is "extended north-preceding south-following (northwest-southeast), stellar." The position precesses to RA 03 25 16.0, Dec -51 15 26, about 1.6 arcmin west-northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
 The only problem with the discusssion above is that Stewart's #191 (= IC 1929) appears to be the same galaxy! However, it turns out that the galaxy lies on two plates which have a considerable overlap, and although no 'new' objects were found on the second plate, the fact that the IC entries have the same description suggests that although the galaxy was not treated as a new object, its position was remeasured, and when the final catalog was being prepared, the slight difference in the positions led to what had been originally considered to be the same object accidentally being listed as a separate object. So not only is the identification as IC 1925 secure, but its probable duplication as IC 1929 is essentially secure, as well.
Note About Dates For "Discoveries": In the NGC/IC, when objects were found on a photographic plate, all objects on the plate were assigned the date the plate was taken as the discovery date, regardless of when the plate was examined. In this case, where two plates were taken of overlapping regions, they were probably taken on the same date; but even if taken on different dates, since no "new" objects were found on the second plate, the discovery date would still be the one for the first plate on which the object was photographed.
Note About Other Designations: Presumably because of the confusion noted above, LEDA has no entry for IC 1925 (and although it does return a page, the only object on that page has nothing to do with IC 1925), and although NED has one, it states that the information on the page in question probably belongs to IC 1929, instead.
Physical Information: Normally a duplicate entry would be assigned the "earlier" designation, but because of the confusion discussed in the previous paragraph, IC 1925 is almost always referred to as IC 1929, so see that entry for anything else.

IC 1926
(= PGC 12790 = ESO 200-020)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Horologium (RA 03 25 19.0, Dec -51 42 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1926 (DeLisle Stewart #189, 1860 RA 03 21 08, NPD 142 11) is "extended, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1927
Recorded (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A pair of stars in Horologium (RA 03 25 13.0, Dec -51 43 56)
Corwin lists a tentative position at RA 03 25 19.8, Dec -51 43 11 (3 25 20.3, -51 43 10 & 3 25 19.3, -51 43 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1927 (DeLisle Stewart #190, 1860 RA 03 21 08, NPD 142 13) is "very faint."
Note About PGC Designation: Although HyperLEDA assigns PGC designations to almost all NGC/IC objects regardless of their nature, a search of the database for IC 1927 returns no result, and therefore for PGC designation.
Physical Information: (To be shown in the wide-field image for IC 1926.)

IC 1928
(= PGC 12884 = ESO 548-020 = MCG -04-09-013)

Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Eridanus (RA 03 27 29.2, Dec -21 33 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1928 (DeLisle Stewart #194, 1860 RA 03 21 20, NPD 112 02) is "very faint, very small, much extended 20°, considerably brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1929 (almost certainly =
IC 1925)
(= PGC 12799 = ESO 200-021)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1925)
Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by DeLisle Stewart (and later listed as IC 1929)
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Horologium (RA 03 25 25.8, Dec -51 16 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1929 (DeLisle Stewart #191, 1860 RA 03 21 20, NPD 141 45) is "extended north-preceding south-following (northwest-southeast)." The position precesses to RA 03 25 27.8, Dec -51 15 28, only about 0.6 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
 As discussed in detail in the entry for IC 1925, it is almost certain that an accidental oversight led to the same galaxy being listed as two separate objects simply because it was seen on two different plates, and that led to considerable confusion not only at the time, but in modern times and catalogues, as well.
Note About Dates For "Discoveries": In the NGC/IC, when objects were found on a photographic plate, all objects on the plate were assigned the date the plate was taken as the discovery date, regardless of when the plate was examined. In this case, where two plates were taken of overlapping regions, they were probably taken on the same date; but even if taken on different dates, since no "new" objects were found on the second plate, the discovery date would still be the one for the first plate on which the object was photographed.
Physical Information: Usually, the "earlier" designation would be used for a duplicate observation, but because of the confusion about the identification in modern catalogs, in this case the entry for IC 1929 is the appropriate place to discuss this galaxy, not the entry for IC 1925.
 Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 13490 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 1929 is about 625 to 630 million light-years away, well beyond a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 400 million light-years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 595 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 610 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 105 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1929, which is also known as IC 1925; also showing is IC 1932
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1929, also showing IC 1932
Below, a 1 acmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, also known as IC 1925
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 1929, also known as IC 1925

IC 1930
(= PGC 1267477)

Discovered (Dec 22, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Taurus (RA 03 28 46.3, Dec +04 23 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1930 (Javelle #977, 1860 RA 03 21 26, NPD 86 05.4) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, 8th magnitude star preceding (to the west) 3 seconds of time, south 1.6 arcmin."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1930 says that there is no entry for that object, but returns a page for PGC 1267477, which is IC 1930.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin?

IC 1931
(= PGC 12950 = CGCG 390-094 = MCG +00-09-087)

Discovered (Dec 23, 1897) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec?) in Taurus (RA 03 28 57.7, Dec +01 45 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1931 (Javelle #978, 1860 RA 03 21 43, NPD 88 44.3) is "very faint, diffuse."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

IC 1932
(= PGC 12817 = ESO 200-022)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec?) in Horologium (RA 03 25 54.0, Dec -51 20 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1932 (DeLisle Stewart #192, 1860 RA 03 21 44, NPD 141 49) is "extended north-south."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1933
(= PGC 12807 = PGC 438631 = ESO 155-025)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type S/IB(s)m:) in Horologium (RA 03 25 39.9, Dec -52 47 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1933 (DeLisle Stewart #193, 1860 RA 03 21 46, NPD 143 16) is "a little extended south-preceding north-following (southwest-northeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.1 arcmin?
Note About Classification: The type is taken from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies.

IC 1934
(= PGC 13080 = UGC 2769)

Discovered (Sep 16, 1901) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Perseus (RA 03 31 14.0, Dec +42 47 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1934 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 21 50, NPD 47 41.3) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little brighter middle, 12th magnitude star 34 arcsec distant."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the HyperLEDA database for IC 1934 returns a message stating that there is no such entry, but does show the page for PGC 13080, which is the galaxy listed above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1935
(= PGC 12833 = ESO 200-023)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in Horologium (RA 03 26 13.3, Dec -50 00 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1935 (DeLisle Stewart #195, 1860 RA 03 21 53, NPD 140 30) is "stellar, extended, spiral?"
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

IC 1936
(= PGC 12847 = ESO 200-024)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Horologium (RA 03 26 27.9, Dec -51 19 22)
Corwin lists 1936nw at RA 03 26 27.6, Dec -51 19 21
and 1936se at RA 03 26 28.1, Dec -51 19 24
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1936 (DeLisle Stewart #196, 1860 RA 03 22 20, NPD 141 48) is "stellar, extended north-preceding south-following (northwest-southeast)."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1937
(= PGC 12856 = ESO 200-025)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Horologium (RA 03 26 47.6, Dec -48 42 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1937 (DeLisle Stewart #197, 1860 RA 03 22 27, NPD 139 11) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1938
(= PGC 12874 = ESO 155-032)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Horologium (RA 03 27 10.3, Dec -53 00 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1938 (DeLisle Stewart #198, 1860 RA 03 23 18, NPD 143 30) is "perhaps a double star."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 1939
Recorded (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A lost or nonexistent object in Horologium (RA 03 27 45.0, Dec -51 04 18)
Corwin lists a tentative position at RA 03 27 18.1, Dec -51 03 01
ne * at RA 03 27 18.4, Dec -51 02 59
sw * at RA 03 27 17.8, Dec -51 03 02
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1939 (DeLisle Stewart #199, 1860 RA 03 23 38, NPD 141 33) is "extended preceding-following (west-east)."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of the HyperLEDA database for IC 1939 returns no result, which is probably appropriate for a catalog of galaxies, even if it turns out that the "object" can be identified as a pair of stars (which, as noted above, is only a tentative result, at that).
Physical Information:

IC 1940
(= PGC 12896 = ESO 200-026)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBab??) in Horologium (RA 03 27 42.3, Dec -52 08 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1940 (DeLisle Stewart #200, 1860 RA 03 23 40, NPD 142 37) has "a brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin?

IC 1941
Recorded (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
Three stars in Taurus (RA 03 32 15.0, Dec +24 23 00)
Corwin lists m* at RA 03 32 14.8, Dec +24 23 03
n* at RA 03 32 15.5, Dec +24 23 22
s* at RA 03 32 14.6, Dec +24 22 34
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1941 (DeLisle Stewart #202, 1860 RA 03 23 56, NPD 66 03) is "very faint, small, very much extended 0° (probably nebulous)."
Note About PGC Designation: Although HyperLEDA assigns PGC designations to almost all NGC/IC objects, regardless of their nature, objects such as this usually don't have an entry, and that is the case with this one; therefore, a search of the LEDA database for IC 1941 returns a message stating that there is no such object.
Physical Information:

IC 1942
(= ESO 155-034 (= PGC 12907 + PGC 12908))

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 27 53.9, Dec -52 40 36)
Corwin lists 1942n = PGC 12908, at RA 03 27 53.9, Dec -52 40 33
1942s at RA 03 27 53.8, Dec -52 40 40
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1942 (DeLisle Stewart #201, 1860 RA 03 24 04, NPD 143 09) is "stellar, extended north-south."
Note About PGC Designations: At least in DSS2 images (and presumably, on Stewart's plate), IC 1942 appears to be binuclear (nothing else is available, so that's about all that can be said at this time). This led to the PGC assigning two designations to the "object", as shown above: PGC 12907 for the southern "component", and PGC 12908 for the northern one. But whether this is a physical pair of galaxies, an optical double, or a single unusual galaxy cannot be determined without far better images.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 1943 (=
NGC 1411)
(= PGC 13429 = PGC 138657 = ESO 249-011 = MCG -07-08-004)

Discovered (Oct 24, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1411)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1943)
A magnitude 11.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Horologium (RA 03 38 44.9, Dec -44 06 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1943 (Swift list XI (#55), 1860 RA 03 24 58, NPD 134 35.3) is "pretty bright, small, round."
Note About PGC Designation: A search of HyperLEDA for IC 1943 states that there is no such object, but returns the page for NGC 1411, which is the same galaxy.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1411 for anything else.

IC 1944
(= PGC 12987 = ESO 200-028)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Horologium (RA 03 29 40.0, Dec -47 59 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1944 (DeLisle Stewart #203, 1860 RA 03 25 14, NPD 138 29) is "extremely faint, extremely small, a little extended 20°."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1945
(= PGC 12970 = ESO 155-038)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Horologium (RA 03 29 16.6, Dec -52 37 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1945 (DeLisle Stewart #204, 1860 RA 03 25 23, NPD 143 07) is "stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 1946
(= PGC 12972 = ESO 155-039)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a??) in Horologium (RA 03 29 22.2, Dec -52 37 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1946 (DeLisle Stewart #205, 1860 RA 03 25 29, NPD 143 06) is "stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin? The lenticular galaxy to its southeast (PGC 74537) is listed as an apparent companion, but is about 1000 million light-years more distant, so it is merely an "optical double".

PGC 74537
Not an IC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
IC 1946
A magnitude 16.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Horologium (RA 03 29 23.5, Dec -52 37 28)
Physical Information: NED 3K Vr 30894 km/sec, z 0.1030528584997 (About 1275 to 1280 million light-years distant)

IC 1947
(= PGC 13027 = ESO 200-030)

Discovered (Oct 14, 1898) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 elliptical galaxy (type E2??) in Horologium (RA 03 30 32.8, Dec -50 20 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1947 (DeLisle Stewart #206, 1860 RA 03 26 25, NPD 140 48) is "stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 1948
(= PGC 13045 = ESO 200-032)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc?) in Horologium (RA 03 30 50.0, Dec -47 57 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1948 (DeLisle Stewart #207, 1860 RA 03 26 27, NPD 138 27) is "most extremely faint, small, round."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin? (For now, see IC 1949 for images.) Although an apparent companion of IC 1949, IC 1948 is twice as distant, so they are only an "optical double".

IC 1949
(= PGC 13047 = ESO 200-033)

Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Horologium (RA 03 30 52.8, Dec -47 58 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 1949 (DeLisle Stewart #208, 1860 RA 03 26 33, NPD 138 28) is "considerably faint, very small, spiral, considerably brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin? Although an apparent companion of IC 1948, IC 1949 is only about half as far from us, so they are only an "optical double".
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 1948 and IC 1949
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 1949, also showing 1948
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
(Current image also shows IC 1948, but an imminent update will show each galaxy by itself
DSS image of spiral galaxies IC 1948 and IC 1949
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1850 - 1899) ←IC Objects: IC 1900 - 1949→ (IC 1950 - 1999)