Celestial Atlas
(IC 1950 - 1999) ←IC Objects: IC 2000 - 2049 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 2050 - 2099)
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Page last updated Dec 16, 2020
Note to self: Replace poor DSS images of 00-19 w/AladinLite versions?
Checked updated Steinicke physical data, Corwin positions, mostly updated formatting
Added Dreyer entries, checked supposed PGC/ESO designations, historical IDs
WORKING 2036: Add pix, captions, tags, physical info for verifiable objects
FINALIZE: Check for Arp, de Vaucoulurs, HCG, similar catalog entries

IC 2000 (= PGC 13912 = ESO 201-003)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.4? spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd?) in Horologium (RA 03 49 07.7 Dec -48 51 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2000 (DeLisle Stewart #244, 1860 RA 03 45 01, NPD 139 17) is "considerably bright, large, extremely extended 80°, very much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 49 10.8, Dec -48 51 22, on the eastern side of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above and well within its outline, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 930 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2000 is about 40 to 45 million light-years away, in reasonable agreement with widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of about 30 to 100 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of about 4.45 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 55 thousand light-years across.
Note About Visual Magnitude: Steinicke lists a value of 11.9, LEDA 12.4, and NED 12.9 (though 'band' is not specified). Given those values, I have used the LEDA magnitude with a question mark.
Note About Classification: Since the galaxy is seen essentially edge-on, even far better images and photometry than currently available would make the type uncertain, hence the question mark.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2000
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2000
Below, a 5.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2000

IC 2001 (= ESO 201 -?05)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
Probably a pair of stars in Horologium (RA 03 50 51.9, Dec -48 35 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2001 (DeLisle Stewart #245, 1860 RA 03 46 43, NPD 139 03) is "extremely faint, very small, round, 3 stars near." The position precesses to RA 03 50 53.4, Dec -48 37 40, but there is nothing there nor near there, though there are three moderately bright stars in an arc just north of the position. Wolfgang Steinicke has suggested that it is a double star 1.7 arcmin nearly due north of Stewart's position, and Harold Corwin agrees that this is a reasonable possibility, because of the three stars in a line near the double star. As a result, that pair of stars is generally thought to be what Stewart observed, and since there are many instances of such objects in the NGC/IC catalog, the identification is probably correct.
Physical Information: Magnitudes 15.6 and 15.9.
DSS image of region near the pair of stars that is probably IC 2001
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the pair of stars that is probably IC 2001

IC 2002 (= PGC 14065 = PGC 14080 and perhaps =
NGC 1474)
(Perhaps) Discovered (Oct 5, 1864) by Albert Marth (and later listed as NGC 1474)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1903) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2002)
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Taurus (RA 03 54 30.3, Dec +10 42 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2002 (Javelle #983, 1860 RA 03 46 49, NPD 79 42.1) is "faint, extended north-south, diffuse, 14th magnitude star to north." The position precesses to RA 03 54 28.6, Dec +10 42 55, just off the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above and only 0.6 arcmin from its center, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discussion of Possible Duplicate Entry: Normally, given a duplicate entry, the discussion of Physical Information would simply say see NGC 1474 for anything else. However, whether NGC 1474 really is IC 2002 is uncertain. As a result, this entry discusses the galaxy in detail, and the entry for NGC 1474 will only discuss the possibility that it is not lost or nonexistent.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 5100 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2002 is about 235 to 240 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 75 thousand light-years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2002, which may be the otherwise lost or nonexistent NGC 1474
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2002, which may be NGC 1474
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2002, which may be the otherwise lost or nonexistent NGC 1474

IC 2003 (= PK 161-14.1 = "PGC 3518479")
Discovered (Jan 18, 1907) by
Thomas Espin
A magnitude 11.9 planetary nebula in Perseus (RA 03 56 22.0, Dec +33 52 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2003 (Espin, 1860 RA 03 47 26, NPD 56 32.3) is "pretty bright, extremely small, a little extended north-south, 13th magnitude star 4 arcsec to north, 12th magnitude star 18 arcsec to southwest." The position precesses to RA 03 56 21.9, Dec +33 52 30, essentially dead center on the planetary nebula listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Note About PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA assigns a PGC designation to almost all NGC/IC object, regardless of their nature; but in this case a search of the database for the PGC designation returns no result, hence its being in quotes.
Physical Information: Based on a parallax of about 0.0002016 arcsec (per SIMBAD), IC 2003 is about 16 thousand light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.3 arcmin for the fainter outer regions and about 0.18 by 0.16 arcmin for the brighter inner regions (from the images below), the central nebula is about 0.85 light-years across, and the outer envelope is about 1.4 light-years wide.
750
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2003
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide image of the nebula (Image Credit Corradi, Schönberner, Steffen & Perinotto)
750
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nebula
750

IC 2004 (= PGC 13986 = ESO 201-006)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 51 45.6, Dec -49 25 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2004 (DeLisle Stewart #246, 1860 RA 03 47 44, NPD 139 50) is "extremely faint, small." The position precesses to RA 03 51 48.8, Dec -49 24 50, only 0.6 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 955 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2004 is about 45 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 10 thousand light-years across, implying that it is a dwarf galaxy, and if so, its appearance may be due to the typically somewhat irregular structures of such small spiral galaxies.
DSS image of region near dwarf spiral(?) galaxy IC 2004
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2004
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of dwarf spiral(?) galaxy IC 2004

IC 2005 (= PGC 14168)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Perseus (RA 03 57 39.5, Dec +36 47 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2005 (Javelle #984, 1860 RA 03 48 31, NPD 53 36.3) is "faint, very small, round, stellar." The position precesses to RA 03 57 39.4, Dec +36 48 18, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 5705 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2005 is about 265 million light-years away, far beyond the superimposed California Nebula (NGC 1499), which is in our own galaxy. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 85 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2005, showing its position 'within' the California Nebula (NGC 1499)
Above, a 1 degree wide DSS image centered on IC 2005 to show its position 'in' the California Nebula
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2005
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2005, as seen through the California Nebula (NGC 1499)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2005
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2005, as seen through the California Nebula (NGC 1499)
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2005
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2005, as seen through the California Nebula (NGC 1499)

IC 2006 (= PGC 14077 = ESO 359-007)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 11.3 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SA0/a) in Eridanus (RA 03 54 28.5, Dec -35 58 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2006 (Swift list XI (#63), 1860 RA 03 48 50, NPD 126 24.3) is "pretty bright, small, round, star near to northeast, double star to southwest." The position precesses to RA 03 54 04.3, Dec -35 59 25, about 5 arcmin west southwest of the galaxy listed above, but the description of the star field makes it clear that what Swift saw was that galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1310 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2006 is about 60 million light-years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 50 to 95 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.7 by 1.45 arcmin (from the HST image below), the galaxy appears to be about 30 thousand light-years across. However, the "deep" de Vaucouleurs image of the galaxy shows that it extends well beyond the field of view shown in the HST image, and that the apparent size of the main galaxy is about 3.0 by 2.6 arcmin, and that of a faint outer ring is about 4.95 by 4.1 arcmin, corresponding to a size of about 50 to 55 thousand light-years for the main galaxy, and about 85 to 90 thousand light-years for the outer ring. A comment in the HST press release indicates that star formation in the galaxy stopped the best part of 10 billion years ago, so almost all the stars now contributing to the light by which we see it are relatively faint stars like the Sun, or even fainter, less massive stars.
Usage By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: IC 2006 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type (R)SA0/a or type (R)E1. The type shown above is based on the de Vaucouleurs image
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2006
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2006
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA,
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt and J. Blakeslee (Dominion Astrophysical Observatory))

HST image of lenticular galaxy IC 2006
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image from the de Vaucouleus Atlas
(Image Credit The de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies published by Cambridge University Press, 2007; reprinted by permission)
de Vaucouleurs Atlas image of lenticular galaxy IC 2006
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy also (faintly) shows its full extent
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2006

IC 2007 (=
IC 2008 = PGC 14106 = PGC 14110 = ESO 419-011)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1896) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2008)
"Rediscovered" (Dec 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2007)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 03 55 22.8, Dec -28 09 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2007 (Swift list XI (#64), 1860 RA 03 49 02, NPD 118 33.5) is "extremely faint, small, round, faint star attached on northeast." The position precesses to RA 03 54 46.7, Dec -28 08 42, almost 8 arcmin (nearly) due west of the galaxy listed above, but the description is perfect and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Note About Duplicate Entry: Swift misrecorded the position of this galaxy both times he observed it, hence its inclusion in the IC with two different numbers. However, his descriptions of the two observations make it clear that they refer to the same object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1430 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2007 is about 65 to 70 million light-years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 60 to 75 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 20 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2007
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2007
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2007
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy IC 2007

IC 2008 (=
IC 2007 = PGC 14106 = PGC 14110 = ESO 419-011)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1896) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2008)
"Rediscovered" (Dec 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2007)
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c) in Eridanus (RA 03 55 22.8, Dec -28 09 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2008 (Swift list XI (#65), 1860 RA 03 49 23, NPD 118 37.6) is "extremely faint, very small, extremely faint star very close to northeast." The position precesses to RA 03 55 07.3, Dec -28 12 51, over 4 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, but the description is perfect and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Note About Duplicate Entry: Swift misrecorded the position of this galaxy both times he observed it, hence its inclusion in the IC with two different numbers. However, his descriptions of the two observations make it clear that they refer to the same object.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 2007 for anything else.

IC 2009 (= PGC 14041 = ESO 201-008)
Discovered (Dec 6, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.8 irregular galaxy (type IAB(s)m) in Horologium (RA 03 53 35.0, Dec -48 59 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2009 (DeLisle Stewart #249, 1860 RA 03 49 26, NPD 139 24) is "extremely faint, small." The position precesses to RA 03 53 32.7, Dec -48 59 07, on the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description is appropriate and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1525 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2009 is about 70 million light-years away, in fair agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 55 to 60 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.85 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 35 to 40 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 2009
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2009
Below, a 2.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 2009

IC 2010 (= PGC 13995 = ESO 117-011)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SABab?) in Reticulum (RA 03 51 58.0, Dec -59 55 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2010 (DeLisle Stewart #247, 1860 RA 03 49 28, NPD 150 20) is "extremely faint, small, extended 70°." The position precesses to RA 03 52 03.0, Dec -59 55 00, about 1 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 5275 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2010 is about 345 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 70 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2010
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2010
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2010

IC 2011 (= ESO 117-?12)
Recorded (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A pair of stars in Reticulum (RA 03 52 27.3, Dec -57 28 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2011 (DeLisle Stewart #248, 1860 RA 03 49 33, NPD 147 54) is "most extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 03 52 33.0, Dec -57 29 03, but there is nothing there nor anywhere near there. However, the pair of stars listed above is only about 1.3 arcmin to the northwest of Stewart's position, and as noted in the case of IC 2001, it is not unusual for such a pair to be described as Stewart described what became IC 2011, so the identification is reasonably certain.
Physical Information: Magnitudes 14.6 and 14.3.
DSS image of region near the pair of stars that are probably IC 2011
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the pair of stars that is probably IC 2011

IC 2012 (= PGC 14027 = ESO 117-013 (= PGC 377455??) + PGC 377455?)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.5 pair(?) of galaxies in Reticulum
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (Sab? pec) at RA 03 52 55.2, Dec -58 38 58
and possibly a galaxy of unknown nature and magnitude at RA 03 52 55.1, Dec -58 39 13
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2012 (DeLisle Stewart #250, 1860 RA 03 50 00, NPD 149 03) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended north-south." The position precesses to RA 03 52 48.2, Dec -58 38 06, about 1.2 arcmin northwest of the object listed above, the description is appropriate and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification of IC 2012 as the brighter northern galaxy is certain. Given Stewart's description "considerably extended north-south", although he couldn't possibly have seen the fainter southern object (so it probably shouldn't be part of IC 2012), it may have influenced his description, so it may be part of IC 2012, and both NED and SIMBAD treat IC 2012 as the pair of galaxies, so I have included the southern object in the description above, despite the uncertainty about whether it is part of IC 2012 or merely an interacting companion.
Problems With PGC Designation: LEDA lists IC 2012 as being both PGC 14027 and PGC 377455, but SIMBAD lists the galaxy to the south of IC 2012 as PGC 377455, as shown above. However, which of the two objects is supposedly PGC 377455 will probably never be known.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 20810 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2012 is about 970 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 890 to 895 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 925 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin (counting what appears to be material thrown into the surrounding space), the spiral galaxy is about 115 to 120 thousand light-years across, while its southern companion, with an apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.1 arcmin, must be about 90 thousand light-years across, and the pair of galaxies, with an apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.4 arcmin, spans about 195 thousand light-years.
DSS image of region near the pair of interacting galaxies comprising IC 2012
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2012
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the presumably interacting galaxies
DSS image of the pair of interacting galaxies comprising IC 2012

IC 2013
Recorded (1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 03 56 44.6, Dec -17 06 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2013 (DeLisle Stewart #251, 1860 RA 03 50 24, NPD 107 31) is "considerably bright, considerably large, much extended 170°, considerably brighter middle, suspected." The position precesses to RA 03 56 44.6, Dec -17 06 29 (whence the position above), but there is nothing there nor anywhere near there that could be in any way match Stewart's description. Corwin notes that if an object matching the description existed it would have been observed by William and/or John Herschel, and concludes that IC 2013 must be a plate defect (something that has always been a problem with glass photographic plates, and apparently was a serious problem with the plate in question, as IC 2030, also "observed" by Stewart on the same plate, must also be a plate defect).
DSS image of region near the nonexistent IC 2013
Above, a 12 arcmin DSS image centered on the position of the nonexistent IC 2013

IC 2014 (= PGC 14108 = ESO 156-020)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Reticulum (RA 03 55 21.7, Dec -56 44 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2014 (DeLisle Stewart #252, 1860 RA 03 52 19, NPD 147 09) is "most extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 03 55 24.2, Dec -56 44 32, only 0.4 arcmin northeast of the center of the galaxy listed above and barely outside its eastern outline, the description fits (keeping in mind that only the nucleus would have been visible) and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 7250 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2014 is about 335 to 340 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 325 to 330 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 330 to 335 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 115 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2014
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2014
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2014

IC 2015 (= PGC 14184 = ESO 302-022)
Discovered (1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 58 11.4, Dec -40 23 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2015 (DeLisle Stewart #253, 1860 RA 03 53 06, NPD 130 51) is "extremely faint, small, round, brighter middle, suspected." The position precesses to RA 03 57 58.7, Dec -40 26 50, a little over an arcmin west of the galaxy listed above. As small and faint as the galaxy is, the description is certainly appropriate, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 15990 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2015 is about 745 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 700 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 715 to 720 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 110 to 115 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2015
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2015
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2015

IC 2016 (= PGC 14322)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Taurus (RA 04 01 59.9, Dec +20 14 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2016 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 53 50, NPD 70 08.7) is "extremely faint, very small, 15th magnitude star 30 arcsec to south." The position precesses to RA 04 01 59.1, Dec +20 15 03, about 0.6 arcmin north-northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description is a perfect fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 6425 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2016 is about 300 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 40 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2016
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2016
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2016
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2016

IC 2017 (= PGC 14140 = ESO 117-015)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SA(s)0/a? pec) in Reticulum (RA 03 56 39.4, Dec -59 23 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2017 (DeLisle Stewart #254, 1860 RA 03 54 04, NPD 149 48) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 03 56 41.4, Dec -59 23 48, barely east of the outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: IC 2017 appears to be a considerably distorted spiral or lenticular galaxy, with not only twisted extensions but also a large, faint, more or less circular region surrounding it (far better images will be required to better determine its true and undoubtedly complex nature). Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 5515 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2017 is about 255 to 260 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.8 by 0.9 arcmin for the main structure and its twisted extensions, and about 2.7 by 2.6 arcmin for the faint outer 'ring' (both sizes from the images below), the main galaxy is about 135 thousand light-years across, while its outer ring spans about 200 thousand light-years.
DSS image of region near peculiar lenticular galaxy IC 2017
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2017
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of peculiar lenticular galaxy IC 2017

IC 2018 (= PGC 14173 = ESO 156-021)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)bc?) in Dorado (RA 03 57 54.6, Dec -52 46 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2018 (DeLisle Stewart #255, 1860 RA 03 54 16, NPD 143 11) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 03 57 53.5, Dec -52 46 55, barely outside the southwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 10120 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2018 is about 470 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 450 to 455 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 460 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 95 to 100 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2018
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2018
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2018

IC 2019 (= PGC 14324)
Discovered (Jan 22, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Taurus (RA 04 01 53.7, Dec +05 38 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2019 (Javelle #985, 1860 RA 03 54 32, NPD 84 46.3) is "faint, small, round, stellar, mottled but not resolved." The position precesses to RA 04 01 57.6, Dec +05 37 24, about 1.4 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain. The only question is whether the fainter (interacting) companion, PGC 200219, should be included in the IC designation. Given the description "mottled", it is possible that its presence may have influenced Javelle's description, but since the smaller galaxy is too faint for him to have observed, it is not generally considered to be part of the IC object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 5520 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2019 is about 255 to 260 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin for the galaxy (and the surrounding material presumably scattered by interaction by PGC 200219), while the galaxy, its companion, and their surrounding material span about 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin (all sizes from the images below), IC 2019 and its immediate surroundings are about 55 thousand light-years across, while the entire system spans about 65 to 70 thousand light-years.
Note About Visual Magnitude of IC 2019: Steinicke lists as 14.5, NED as 15.3 in g-band (which is close to but not the same as visual magnitude), while SIMBAD lists 16.7 for the g-band. Given those numbers, 14.5 is probably too bright, hence my choice of a slightly higher and somewhat uncertain value.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2019 and its companion, lenticular galaxy PGC 200219
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2019, also showing PGC 200219
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxies
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2019 and its companion, lenticular galaxy PGC 200219
Below, a 1,25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the pair
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2019 and its companion, lenticular galaxy PGC 200219

PGC 200219
Not an IC object but listed here since interacting with
IC 2019
A magnitude 17(?) lenticular galaxy (type SA(s)0/a? pec) in Taurus (RA 04 01 52.7, Dec +05 38 10)
Historical Note: Although interacting with IC 2019, PGC 200219 is thought to have been too faint for Javelle to notice, so it is not considered part of the IC object.
Physical Information: Other than its apparent size and brightness there appears to be nothing available about PGC 200219's physical characteristics. However, given its interaction with IC 2019, it must be at about the same distance, or about 255 to 260 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.1 arcmin (from the images above and below), it is about 30 thousand light-years across (ignoring material scattered by its interaction with IC 2019; for a discussion of the overall size of the interacting pair and wider-field images, see that entry).
Note About Visual Magnitude: Steinicke lists the same visual magnitude of 14.5 as for IC 2019, but PGC 200219 is obviouly much fainter than IC 2019. The GAIA database states that the g-band magnitude is 1.8 magnitudes fainter than IC 2019, whence my estimate of the visual magnitude for this galaxy.
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 200219, also showing part of its interacting companion, IC 2019
Above, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of PGC 200219 and IC 2019 (which see)

IC 2020 (= PGC 14211 = ESO 156-022)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Reticulum (RA 03 58 53.2, Dec -54 03 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2020 (DeLisle Stewart #256, 1860 RA 03 55 31, NPD 144 27) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 03 58 57.8, Dec -54 03 07, about 0.8 arcmin east-northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 6365 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2020 is about 295 to 300 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 45 to 50 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2020
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2020
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2020

IC 2021 (= PGC 14229 = ESO 156-024)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Dorado (RA 03 59 23.9, Dec -52 39 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2021 (DeLisle Stewart #257, 1860 RA 03 55 46, NPD 143 04) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 03 59 23.6, Dec -52 40 11, about 0.8 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the only other nearby object is accounted for by Stewart's #259 (IC 2023), so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 9040 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2021 is about 420 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 410 to 415 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 415 to 420 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 60 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2021, also showing IC 2023
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2021, also showing IC 2023
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2021

IC 2022 (= PGC 14203 = ESO 117-017)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Reticulum (RA 03 58 40.0, Dec -59 02 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2022 (DeLisle Stewart #258, 1860 RA 03 56 03, NPD 149 26) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, much extended 5°, considerably brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 03 58 42.9, Dec -59 02 09, about 0.6 arcmin more or less northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits that galaxy, and although there is a considerably brighter galaxy (PGC 14214) only 2.6 arcmin to the southeast, it would have a completely different description, so though it is odd that Stewart failed to record its presence, it cannot be his #258, and the identification shown here is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 6705 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2022 is about 310 to 315 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 65 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2022
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2022
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2022

IC 2023 (= PGC 14238 = ESO 156-025)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.1 lenticular galaxy (type S(s)0/a?) in Dorado (RA 03 59 40.6, Dec -52 40 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2023 (DeLisle Stewart #259, 1860 RA 03 56 04, NPD 143 05) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 03 59 41.3, Dec -52 41 14, less than 0.4 arcmin south-southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the only other object anywhere near is accounted for by Stewart's #257 (IC 2021), so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 9765 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2023 is about 455 million light-years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 490 to 515 million light-years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 435 to 440 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 445 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 85 to 90 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2023, also showing IC 2021
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2023, also showing IC 2021
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2023

IC 2024 (= PGC 14249 = PGC 430628 = ESO 156-026)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd?) in Reticulum (RA 04 00 04.0, Dec -53 22 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2024 (DeLisle Stewart #260, 1860 RA 03 56 36, NPD 143 46) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably extended 35°." The position precesses to RA 04 00 07.6, Dec -53 22 19, about 0.5 arcmin east of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, the description is a perfect fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 11655 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2024 is about 540 to 545 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 515 to 520 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 525 to 530 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.25 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 185 to 190 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2024
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 024
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2024

IC 2025 (= PGC 14257 = ESO 156-028)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type S(s)b?) in Reticulum (RA 04 00 23.2, Dec -53 03 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2025 (DeLisle Stewart #261, 1860 RA 03 56 47, NPD 143 28) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably extended 135°." The position precesses to RA 04 00 20.9, Dec -53 04 21, about 0.5 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description is a perfect fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 12965 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2025 is about 600 to 605 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 575 to 580 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 585 to 590 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 165 to 170 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2025
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS centered on IC 2025
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2025

IC 2026 (=
NGC 1509 = PGC 14393, and not = PGC 14389)
Discovered (Oct 22, 1886) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1509)
Also observed (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1509)
Discovered (Dec 16, 1897) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 2026)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Eridanus (RA 04 03 55.2, Dec -11 10 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2026 (Bigourdan #376, 1860 RA 03 57 18, NPD 101 34) is "very faint, very small, stellar." The position precesses to RA 04 03 55.6, Dec -11 10 43, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above, and though the description isn't as accurate as Swift's earlier but inaccurate observation, there is nothing comparable nearby, and Bigourdan's micrometric measurements are usually very accurate, so the identification is certain. However, despite that, PGC 14389, the much fainter galaxy to the west of NGC 1509, is sometimes misidentified as IC 2026, so it is discussed in the following entry, as a warning about the misidentification.
Note About The Duplicate Entry: When Bigourdan looked for NGC 1509, he failed to find it, because Swift's position is nearly 3 arcmin east of the correct position (though there is no doubt that what Swift and Stone observed was the galaxy listed above); but Bigourdan did see the object, and thought it was a 'nova', so it became an IC object as well.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1509 for anything else.

PGC 14389
Not an IC object but listed here because sometimes misidentified as
IC 2026
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type SAB(s)0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 03 50.5, Dec -11 10 52)
Historical Misidentification: Too faint to have been seen by any of the discoverers of NGC 1509 = IC 2026, but sometimes misidentified (e.g., by LEDA) as IC 2026.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8780 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 14389 is about 405 to 410 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 395 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 400 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 70 thousand light-years across. The galaxy may be associated with the galaxy that it is misidentified with (IC 2026 = NGC 1509), as the difference in their recessional velocities is within the range of normal peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities; but it is just as likely that they are separated by millions of light-years.
Classification Note: Although generally considered to be a lenticular galaxy, the PanSTARRS images below make it seem equally likely that PGC 14389 is actually some kind of spiral galaxy; so if more detailed studies are done in the future, this entry may require a new description for the object.
DSS image of region near NGC 1509, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 14389, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 2026
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1509 and PGC 14389
Below, a 2.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of PGC 14389 and NGC 1509
PanSTARRS image of NGC 1509 and lenticular galaxy PGC 14389, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 2026
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of PGC 14389
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 14389, which is sometimes misidentified as IC 2026

IC 2027 (= PGC 14473)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle
A magnitude 14.1 elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Perseus (RA 04 06 39.6, Dec +37 06 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2027 (Javelle #986, 1860 RA 03 57 28, NPD 53 14.5) is "faint, very small, round, very little brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 04 06 40.8, Dec +37 08 31, about 1.5 arcmin nearly due north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 6135 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2027 is about 285 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 55 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 2027
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2027
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy IC 2027
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy IC 2027

IC 2028 (= PGC 14299 = PGC 439854 = PGC 1749373 = ESO 156-032)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Dorado (RA 04 01 18.2, Dec -52 42 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2028 (DeLisle Stewart #262, 1860 RA 03 57 40, NPD 143 06) is "considerably faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 04 01 16.3, Dec -52 42 31, on the western rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 9935 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2028 is about 460 to 465 million light-years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 445 to 565 million light-years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 445 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 450 to 455 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 115 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2028, also showing IC 2029
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2028, also showing IC 2029
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2028

IC 2029 (= PGC 14298 = ESO 156-033)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc? pec) in Dorado (RA 04 01 18.0, Dec -52 48 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2029 (DeLisle Stewart #263, 1860 RA 03 57 41, NPD 143 12) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 04 01 16.5, Dec -52 48 31, about 0.6 arcmin south-southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits, and there is nothing else close enough to justify any doubt about the identification, so it must be considered certain. (As in the case of IC 2022 there is another, considerably brighter galaxy (PGC 14278) about 3.7 arcmin to the west-southwest that Stewart failed to notice.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 10015 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2029 is about 465 to 470 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 445 to 450 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 455 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 125 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2029, also showing IC 2028
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2029, also showing IC 2028
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2029

IC 2030
Recorded (1900) by
DeLisle Stewart
A nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 04 04 56.9, Dec -19 13 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2030 (DeLisle Stewart #264, 1860 RA 03 58 44, NPD 109 37) is "considerably faint, very small, extremely extended 135°, suspected." The position precesses to RA 04 04 56.9, Dec -19 13 56 (whence the position above), but as in the case of IC 2013, there is nothing there nor anywhere near there that could possibly be what Stewart observed, and as noted by Corwin, both objects must have been defects on the glass photographic plate involved with their "discovery", and therefore do not exist.
DSS image of region near the nonexistent IC 2030
Above, a 12 arcmin DSS image centered on the position of the nonexistent IC 2030

IC 2031 (almost certainly = PGC 146069)
Discovered (late 1890's?) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec?) in Eridanus (RA 04 06 14.7, Dec -05 39 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2031 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 59 ..., NPD 96 00±) is "extremely faint, very small, diffuse, a little brighter middle, 11th magnitude star 3 arcmin to northeast." The obviously very rough position precesses to RA 04 05 53.7, Dec -05 37 03, but (as might be expected, given the description and the rough position) there doesn't appear to anything there nor anywhere near there. However, as it turns out there is an object that fits the description, namely a galaxy that looks so nearly stellar that its actual nature wasn't recognized as being anything but a star for decades; and that object is almost certainly IC 2031, as it fits the description, has an 11th magnitude star to its northeast, and lies only about 5.6 arcmin east-southeast of the NGC position, which considering how rough that is, is actually pretty close. As a result, it is almost certain that the compact galaxy listed above is IC 2031.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 4725 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2031 is about 220 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 20 to 25 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2031 shows it as if it were a star
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2031 shows an apparently stellar object
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image shows that it is a galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2031
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2031

IC 2032 (= PGC 14481 = ESO 156-042)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.1 irregular galaxy (type IAB(s)m? pec) in Dorado (RA 04 07 03.2, Dec -55 19 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2032 (DeLisle Stewart #265, 1860 RA 04 03 48, NPD 145 41) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 04 06 59.4, Dec -55 18 34, just under an arcmin north-northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description is a reasonable fit for the kind of observations made at the time of its discovery, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1045 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2032 is about 45 to 50 million light-years away, in good agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 40 to 45 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.7 by 1.05 arcmin including its faint eastern extension, and 0.8 by 0.65 for only the brighter western part of the galaxy (both sizes from the images below), the bright part of the galaxy is about 10 to 12 thousand light-years across, and its overall size is about 25 thousand light-years.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy IC 2032
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2032
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of irregular galaxy IC 2032

IC 2033 (= PGC 14491 = PGC 427314 = ESO 156-043)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)ab?) in Dorado (RA 04 07 14.4, Dec -53 40 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2033 (DeLisle Stewart #267, 1860 RA 04 03 50, NPD 144 03) is "extremely faint, very small, considerably extended 130°." The position precesses to RA 04 07 15.3, Dec -53 40 36, barely outside the northeastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description perfectly fits the galaxy and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 12410 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2033 is about 575 to 580 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 550 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 560 to 565 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 190 to 195 thousand light-years across, meaning that it is considerably larger than most "large" spiral galaxies, such as our own galaxy.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2033
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2033
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2033

IC 2034 (= PGC 14469 = ESO 117-022)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Reticulum (RA 04 06 36.9, Dec -57 57 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2034 (DeLisle Stewart #266, 1860 RA 04 03 55, NPD 148 19) is "most extremely faint, very small, considerably extended 115°." The position precesses to RA 04 06 41.2, Dec -57 56 33, about 1.3 arcmin north-northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8365 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2034 is about 390 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 375 to 380 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 380 to 385 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.25 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 135 to 140 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2034
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2034
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2034

IC 2035 (= PGC 14558 = ESO 250-007)
Discovered (1898) by
Robert Innes
A magnitude 11.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Horologium (RA 04 09 01.9, Dec -45 31 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2035 (Innes (#2), 1860 RA 04 04 41, NPD 135 53) is "faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 04 09 02.4, Dec -45 30 50, barely off the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1455 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2035 is about 65 to 70 million light-years away, in almost inevitable agreement with widely-varying redshift-independent distance estimates of about 15 to 75 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 20 to 25 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2035
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2035
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2035

IC 2036 (= PGC 14586 = ESO 303-001)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)b?) in Horologium (RA 04 09 55.1, Dec -39 41 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2036 (Swift list XI (#66), 1860 RA 04 05 06, NPD 130 04.4) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult, 9th magnitude star to east." The position precesses to RA 04 09 58.3, Dec -39 42 21, about 1.2 arcmin south-southeast of the galaxy listed above, and although the only noticeable star to the east is 11th magnitude, there is nothing else in the region, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 6205 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2036 is about 290 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 85 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2036
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2036
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2036

IC 2037 (= PGC 14521 = ESO 118-001)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Reticulum (RA 04 08 19.0, Dec -58 45 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2037 (DeLisle Stewart #269, 1860 RA 04 05 46, NPD 149 06) is "extremely faint, very small, extremely extended 90°, considerably brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 04 08 22.8, Dec -58 43 52, about 1.3 arcmin north-northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8310 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2037 is about 385 to 390 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 375 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 380 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.6 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 175 thousand light-years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2037
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2037
Below, a 2.1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2037

IC 2038 (= PGC 14553 = PGC 404122 = ESO 157-001)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Dorado (RA 04 08 54.1, Dec -55 59 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2038 (DeLisle Stewart #270, 1860 RA 04 05 50, NPD 146 21) is "extremely faint, very small, extremely extended 145°." The position precesses to RA 04 08 54.2, Dec -55 58 55, only about 0.6 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above and barely east of its northern arm, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby save for Stewart's #271 (IC 2039), which has a completely different description and a similar error in the position, so the identification of the pair is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.4 arcmin?
Interaction With Nearby Galaxies: Per Cattapan et al, IC 2038 and 2039 are probably interacting with NGC 1533, a strongly distorted spiral galaxy to the southeast of the pair, and are probably interacting with other as well.
NED Sd pec, 1.7 x .4 arcmin, 3K Vr 693 km/sec, single RIDE 19.2 Mpc

IC 2039 (= PGC 14560 = PGC 403950 = ESO 157-002)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Dorado (RA 04 09 02.3, Dec -56 00 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2039 (DeLisle Stewart #271, 1860 RA 04 05 56, NPD 146 22) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 04 08 59.9, Dec -55 59 56, about 0.8 arcmin north-northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby save for Stewart's #270 (IC 2038), which has a completely different description and a similar error in the position, so the identification of the pair is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?
Interaction With Nearby Galaxies: Per Cattapan et al, IC 2039 and 2038 are probably interacting with NGC 1533, a strongly distorted spiral galaxy to the southeast of the pair, and are probably interacting with other as well.
NED pair w/2038, 3K Vr 798 km/sec, 1.0 x .7 arcmin, S0supo pec; LEDA E/S0

IC 2040 (= PGC 14670 = PGC 14671 = ESO 359-030)
Discovered (Dec 23, 1897) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 12 59.8, Dec -32 33 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2040 (Swift list XI (#67), 1860 RA 04 06 58, NPD 122 56.1) is "very faint, very small, round, partially resolved (some stars seen)?, (NGC) 1531-32 to south." The position precesses to RA 04 12 21.6, Dec -32 34 26, about 8 arcmin (nearly 40 seconds of time) west of the galaxy listed above, but that sort of error in the right ascension is not unusual for Swift and there is abolutely nothing else nearby save for the NGC objects described in his note, which are nearly due south of his position, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin?
IC 2041 (= PGC 14656 = ESO 359-028 =
IC 2048)
Recorded (Dec 10, 1895) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2048)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2041)
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 12 34.9, Dec -32 49 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2041 (Swift list XI (#68), 1860 RA 04 07 13, NPD 123 14.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, 10th magnitude star close to south." The position precesse to RA 04 12 35.3, Dec -32 52 29, about 3.4 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby that Swift could have seen but the NGC objects to its west, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 2042 (= ESO 250-*11)
Recorded (Feb 5, 1897) by
Robert Innes
A magnitude 10.9 star in Horologium (RA 04 11 43.0, Dec -47 16 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2042 (Innes (2), 1860 RA 04 07 34, NPD 137 37.3) is "a 9th magnitude star in a nebula 1 arcmin in diameter." The position precesses to RA 04 11 43.7, Dec -47 15 38, only 0.6 arcmin north-northeast of the star listed above. The only problem is that there is no nebula associated with the star, but that is not an uncommon situation with NGC objects described in that way, so there is no doubt about the identification.

IC 2043 (= PGC 14623 = ESO 157-004)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sb??) in Dorado (RA 04 11 09.5, Dec -53 41 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2043 (DeLisle Stewart #272, 1860 RA 04 07 50, NPD 144 03) is "extremely faint, very small, extremely extended 5°, very much brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 04 11 13.2, Dec -53 41 19, about 0.5 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 2044 (= PGC 14624 = ESO 157-006)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type SB??) in Dorado (RA 04 11 14.0, Dec -54 31 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2044 (DeLisle Stewart #273, 1860 RA 04 07 58, NPD 144 53) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 04 11 14.1, Dec -54 31 20, about 0.5 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, the description is appropriate for the material available to Stewart and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2045 (= PGC 14722, and perhaps =
NGC 1538)
Perhaps discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1538)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1900) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 2045)
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E3/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 04 14 36.0, Dec -13 10 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2045 (Howe list III (#14), 1860 RA 04 08 05, NPD 103 31.7) is "extremely faint, extremely small, almost stellar, near (NGC) 1538." The position precesses to RA 04 14 35.8, Dec -13 10 21, on the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so there is no doubt that PGC 14722 is IC 2045. The only question is, why does Howe say that it is near NGC 1538? That would only make sense if he thought that what became IC 2047 was NGC 1538, but since he lists that object as his III #15, that doesn't seem reasonable. In any event, see NGC 1538 for a discussion of the posssibility that it is either IC 2045 or 2047, but that there is no way to know which, if either, is correct, so only the IC designations are certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 9020 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2045 is about 420 million light-years away, considerably further than a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 325 million light-years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 405 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, just over 410 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below and a comparison of various databases), the galaxy is about 100 thousand light-years across.
Note About Classification: The images below appear to show a more or less normal elliptical galaxy (type E3), but in some places it is listed as type E/S0, hence the double classification and question mark in the description line for this entry.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2045, which may also be NGC 1538; also shown are IC 2047 and PGC 941589
Above, a 12 arcmin DSS image centered on IC 2045, also showing IC 2047 and PGC 941589
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 2045; also shown is PGC 941589
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2045, which may (or may not) also be NGC 1538; also shown is PGC 941589
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of IC 2045; also shown is PGC 941589
PanSTARRS  image of lenticular galaxy IC 2045, which may (or may not) also be NGC 1538; also shown is PGC 941589

PGC 941589
Not an IC object but listed here since it may be a companion of
IC 2045
A magnitude 15(?) galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 14 32.8, Dec -13 11 02)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 8575 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 941589 is about 400 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 390 to 395 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, not quite 400 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 50 to 55 thousand light-years across. Note: DSS images of the galaxy make it look like it might be bi-nuclear, and I have seen references to that; but the PanSTARRS image clearly shows that it is not.
Apparent Companionship With IC 2045: Given the substantial recessional velocity difference between this galaxy and IC 2045, they are probably not companions at all; and although it is possible that they're like ships passing in the night and happen to be temporarily at about the same distance, their large relative velocity almost certainly means they cannot be gravitationally bound, and are almost certainly merely an optical double.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2045, which may also be NGC 1538; also shown are IC 2047 and PGC 941589
Above, a 12 arcmin DSS image centered on IC 2045, also showing IC 2047 and PGC 941589
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 2045; also shown is PGC 941589
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2045, which may (or may not) also be NGC 1538; also shown is PGC 941589
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of PGC 941589
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 941589

IC 2046 (= PGC 14628 = ESO 157-007)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc??) in Dorado (RA 04 11 24.5, Dec -54 40 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2046 (DeLisle Stewart #274, 1860 RA 04 08 11, NPD 145 02) is "very faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 04 11 25.6, Dec -54 40 22, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 2047 (= PGC 941480, and perhaps =
NGC 1538)
Perhaps discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 1538)
Discovered (Jan 20, 1900) by Herbert Howe (and later listed as IC 2047)
A magnitude 15.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 04 14 56.1, Dec -13 11 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2047 (Howe list III (#15), 1860 RA 04 08 25, NPD 103 32.7) is "extremely faint, extremely small, difficult, near (NGC) 1538." The position precesses to RA 04 14 55.7, Dec -13 11 24, on the northwestern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing nearby, so the identification is certain. The only question is, why does Howe say that it is near NGC 1538? That would only make sense if he thought that what became IC 2045 was NGC 1538, but since he lists that object as his III #14, that doesn't seem reasonable. In any event, see NGC 1538 for a discussion of the posssibility that it is either IC 2045 or 2047, but that there is no way to know which, if either, is correct, so only the IC designations are certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8055 km/sec, IC 2047 is about 375 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.95 by 0.45 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light-years across. (Almost nothing is known about PGC 941469, so whether it has any relationship to IC 2047 save being in the same direction is mere speculation.)
NED 3K Vr 7975 km/sec, 0.97x0.4 arcmin, single RIDE 142 Mpc, m? 15.98; SIMBAD g 17.2, LEDA B 15.98, V 15(?), PSTARR .25 x .2 arcmin, DSS .3 x .25 arcmin
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2047, which may (or may not) also be NGC 1538; also shown are PGC 941469, IC 2045, and the traditional NGC 1538 (PGC 3093623)
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2047
Also shown are IC 2045, PGC 941469 and PGC 3093623
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of IC 2047; also shown is PGC 941469
DSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2047, which may (or may not) also be NGC 1538; also shown is PGC 941469
Below, a 0.9 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of IC 2047 and PGC 941469
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2047, which may (or may not) also be NGC 1538; also shown is PGC 941469
Corwin lists an apparent western companion (PGC 941469) at RA 04 14 54.2, Dec -13 11 33
But there appears to be almost no information about the galaxy, so whether it is a companion is unknown

IC 2048 (= ESO 360-?01 and =
IC 2041 = PGC 14656 = ESO 359-028)
Recorded (Dec 10, 1895) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2048)
Discovered (Sep 29, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 2041)
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Eridanus (RA 04 14 34.9, Dec -32 49 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2048 (Swift list XI (#69), 1860 RA 04 09 00, NPD 123 28.6) is "most extremely faint, extremely small, bright star to east, very difficult." The position precesses to RA 04 14 20.8, Dec -33 07 18, but there is nothing there nor near there. However, Swift's original paper gave far more information, stating "...bright star to east, (NGC) 1532 to west; 3 in field including double nebula." And looking at the field to the east of NGC 1532 for something with a bright star to its east, we find IC 2041; so although Swift's position for his XI #69 is about as far off the mark as possible, there can be no doubt that it is simply a very poorly measured duplicate observation of his XI #68 (IC 2041). In other words, the position is terrible, but Swift's original description of the field of view makes the identification absolutely certain.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see IC 2041 for anything else, save for the image below, proving that IC 2048 must be the same object.
DSS image centered on lenticular galaxy IC 2048, which is a duplicate observation of IC 2041, also showing NGC 1531 and NGC 1532
Above, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2048 =IC 2041, also showing NGC 1531 and 1532

IC 2049 (= PGC 14636 = ESO 118-009)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1899) by
DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)d?) in Reticulum (RA 04 12 04.2, Dec -58 33 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2049 (DeLisle Stewart #275, 1860 RA 04 09 28, NPD 148 54) is "extremely faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 04 12 04.6, Dec -58 32 32, about 0.9 arcmin north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2049
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2049
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2049
Celestial Atlas
(IC 1950 - 1999) ←IC Objects: IC 2000 - 2049→ (IC 2050 - 2099)