Celestial Atlas
(IC 2250 - 2299) ←IC Objects: IC 2300 - 2349 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (IC 2350 - 2399)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
2300, 2301, 2302, 2303, 2304, 2305, 2306, 2307, 2308, 2309, 2310, 2311, 2312, 2313, 2314, 2315, 2316,
2317, 2318, 2319, 2320, 2321, 2322, 2323, 2324, 2325, 2326, 2327, 2328, 2329, 2330, 2331, 2332, 2333,
2334, 2335, 2336, 2337, 2338, 2339, 2340, 2341, 2342, 2343, 2344, 2345, 2346, 2347, 2348, 2349

Page last updated June 21, 2021
Updating formatting
WORKING 2312+: Adding Dreyer entries
WORKING 2332+: Checking Corwin positions
WORKING 2311, 2313+:historical IDs (Corwin+), adding pix, captions, tags

IC 2300
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 15.4 star in Cancer (RA 08 20 12.6, Dec +18 25 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2300 (Wolf list I #65, 1860 RA 08 12 10, NPD 71 08.6) is "faint, pretty small, irregular figure, arms north and preceding (to west)." The position precesses to RA 08 20 12.5, De +18 25 13, almost dead center on the star listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and although the description is wrong, almost all of Wolf's list I "nebulae" turned out to be stars, so the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin writes that it is also verified by a print of the original plate.)
Note About LEDA Search: A search of LEDA for IC 2300 does not recognize the designation (and says so), but returns a result for a magnitude 19 galaxy just under 0.8 arcmin southeast of IC 2300, which is undoubtedly at some immense distance, but about which almost nothing appears to be known.
DSS image of region near the stars listed as IC 2300 and IC 2301
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2300, also showing IC 2301
(The stars to the left of each label are the IC objects)

IC 2301
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 15.4 star in Cancer (RA 08 20 13.9, Dec +18 26 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2301 (Wolf list I #66, 1860 RA 08 12 12, NPD 71 07.7) is "very faint, small, much extended, exceptional nucleus, star south-following (to the southeast)." The position precesses to RA 08 20 14.6, Dec +18 26 07, less than 0.2 arcmin east of the star listed above, there is nothing else nearby other than the star to its southeast (which does more to confirm the identification than anything else in the description), and though the description is otherwise wrong, almost all of Wolf's list I "nebulae" turned out to be stars, so the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin writes that it is also verified by a print of the original plate.)
Note About LEDA Search: A search of LEDA for IC 2301 does not recognize the designation, and returns no result.
DSS image of region near the stars listed as IC 2300 and IC 2301
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2300, also showing IC 2301
(The stars to the left of each label are the IC objects)

IC 2302
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16 star in Cancer (RA 08 20 17.3, Dec +19 21 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2302 (Wolf list I #67, 1860 RA 08 12 12, NPD 70 12.4) is "faint, very small, round, very little brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 08 20 17.4, Dec +19 21 24, nearly dead center on the star listed above, the description is a reasonable description of a stellar image, there is absolutely nothing else nearby and almost all of Wolf's list I "nebulae" turned out to be stars, so the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin writes that it is also verified by a print of the original plate.)
Note About LEDA Search: A search of LEDA for IC 2302 does not recognize the designation, and returns no result.
DSS image of region near the star listed as IC 2302, also showing the stars listed as IC 2303 and 2305, the double star listed as IC 2304, and part of IC 2307
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2302, also showing IC 2303, 2304 and 2305 and part of IC 2307
(The object near (usually above) each label is the IC object)

IC 2303
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16 star in Cancer (RA 08 20 19.3, Dec +19 25 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2303 (Wolf list I #68, 1860 RA 08 12 15, NPD 70 08.7) is "faint, very small, much extended 0°." The position precesses to RA 08 20 20.6, Dec +19 25 06, only about 0.3 arcmin nearly due east of the star listed above, there is nothing else nearby, and although the description is wrong, almost all of Wolf's list I "nebulae" turned out to be stars, so the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin writes that it is also verified by a print of the original plate.)
Note About LEDA Search: A search of LEDA for IC 2303 does not recognize the designation (and says so), but returns a result for a magnitude 20.5 galaxy or pair of galaxies (barely visible as an apparently extremely faint star in the DSS image below) just under an arcmin north-northeast of IC 2303 about which virtually nothing is known, other than that it has a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background of 131,140 km/sec, implying a distance corrected for relativistic effects of about 3850 million light-years at the time that the light by which we now see it left it, about 4620 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time).
DSS image of region near the star listed as IC 2303, also showing the stars listed as IC 2302 and 2305, the double star listed as IC 2304, and IC 2307
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2303, also showing IC 2302, 2304, 2305 and 2307

IC 2304
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A pair of stars of magnitudes 15.3 and 16.8 in Cancer (RA 08 20 35.6, Dec +19 26 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2304 (Wolf list I #69, 1860 RA 08 12 30, NPD 70 07.3) is "bright, very small, nebulous star." The position precesses to RA 08 20 35.6, Dec +19 26 27, less than 0.1 arcmin north of the mid-point of the pair of stars listed above, there is nothing nearby that isn't already accounted for by other observations by Wolf and the description is reasonable, so the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin writes that it is also verified by a print of the original plate.)
Note About LEDA Search: A search of LEDA for IC 2304 does not recognize the designation, and returns no result.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2307, also showing the double star listed as IC 2304, the stars listed as IC 2303 and IC 2305, and IC 2308
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2307, also showing IC 2303, 2304, 2305 and 2308

IC 2305
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.1 star in Cancer (RA 08 20 40.1, Dec +19 27 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2305 (Wolf list I #70, 1860 RA 08 12 35, NPD 70 06.5) is "very faint, small, nuclear." The position precesses to RA 08 20 40.6, Dec +19 27 14, only 0.1 arcmin east-northeast of the star listed above, the description is reasonable, there is nothing nearby that isn't already accounted for by another of Wolf's observations, so the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin writes that it is also verified by a print of the original plate.)
Note About LEDA Search: A search of LEDA for IC 2305 does not recognize the designation (and says so), but returns a result for IC 2307, which is reasonable, since it is the only nearby galaxy.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2307, also showing the double star listed as IC 2304, the stars listed as IC 2303 and IC 2305, and IC 2308
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2307, also showing IC 2303, 2304, 2305 and 2308

IC 2306
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16 star in Cancer (RA 08 20 39.4, Dec +19 06 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2306 (Wolf list I #71, 1860 RA 08 12 35, NPD 70 27.1) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 08 20 39.6, Dec +19 06 38, less than 0.1 arcmin northeast of the star listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin writes that it is also verified by a print of the original plate.)
Note About LEDA Search: A search of LEDA for IC 2306 does not recognize the designation, and returns no result.
DSS image of region near the star listed as IC 2306
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2306

IC 2307
(= PGC 23417 = CGCG 089-004)

Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Cancer (RA 08 20 42.8, Dec +19 26 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2307 (Wolf list I #72, 1860 RA 08 12 39, NPD 70 07.3) is "pretty bright, pretty small, diffuse, extended 0°." The position precesses to RA 08 20 44.6, Dec +19 26 26, only 0.4 arcmin nearly due east of the galaxy listed above, the description is perfect and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 13175 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2307 is about 610 to 615 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 580 to 585 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 595 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 100 thousand light-years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy IC 2307, also showing the double star listed as IC 2304, the stars listed as IC 2303 and IC 2305, and IC 2308
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2307, also showing IC 2303, 2304, 2305 and 2308
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy IC 2307

IC 2308
(= PGC 23415 = CGCG 089-006 = MCG +03-22-001)

Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Cancer (RA 08 20 45.3, Dec +19 21 44),
or up to three interacting galaxies at that average position
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2308 (Wolf list I #73, 1860 RA 08 12 40, NPD 70 11.9) is "pretty bright, very small, irregular figure, brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 08 20 45.3, Dec +19 21 50, only about 0.1 arcmin north of the object listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 5980 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2308 is about 275 to 280 million light-years away, in almost inevitable agreement with widely varying redshift-independent distance estimates of about 115 to 410 million light-years (with a median estimate of about 260 to 265 mllion light-years). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.4 by just under 0.2 arcmin for the central structure and about 1.0 by just over 0.4 arcmin for what looks like widely scattered material (from the images below), the main structure is about 30 to 35 thousand light-years across, and the scattered outliers may span as much as 80 thousand light-years.
Classification Notes: Based on the available images, this "object" is two or three interacting galaxies and material scattered by their interaction, two members of which (the northern and southwestern) are definitely confirmed by radial velocity measurements. Assigning a proper classification to any of the objects is essentially impossible without better images, and although Corwin lists three positions for various parts of the structure (RA 08 20 45.3, Dec +19 21 46 for the northern portion, RA 08 20 45.8, Dec +19 21 41 for the southeastern portion, and RA 08 20 44.8, Dec +19 21 44 for the southwestern portion), how many different objects they represent is also unknown. Only far more study with enormous Earth- or space-based telescopes can hope to shed any light on the actual nature of the object.
SDSS image of the region near the interacting galaxies listed as IC 2308, also showing IC 2307, the star listed as IC 2305 and the double star listed as IC 2304
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2308, also showing IC 2304, 2305 and 2307
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2308 and its immediate surroundings
SDSS image of the interacting galaxies listed as IC 2308 and their immediate surroundings

IC 2309
(= PGC 23416 = CGCG 089-003)

Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sb? edge-on) in Cancer (RA 08 20 43.6, Dec +18 23 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2309 (Wolf list I #74, 1860 RA 08 12 41, NPD 71 09.9) is "very faint, pretty small, extended 165°." The position precesses to RA 08 20 43.4, Dec +18 23 50, less than an arcmin west of the center of the galaxy listed above and practically on the outer rim of the galaxy, the description is reasonable (although the position angle is more like 185°) and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 11745 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2309 is about 545 to 550 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 520 to 525 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 530 to 535 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 95 to 100 thousand light-years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2309, also showing the star listed as IC 2310
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2309, also showing IC 2310
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2309

IC 2310
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A magnitude 16.0 star in Cancer (RA 08 20 46.3, Dec +18 27 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2310 (Wolf list I #75, 1860 RA 08 12 44, NPD 71 05.9) is "pretty bright, pretty small, much extended 40°, curved, much brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 08 20 46.6, Dec +18 27 49, less than an arcmin northeast of the star listed above, and although the description is obviously wrong, most of the fainter objects in Wolf's list I are stars misidentified as nebulae, so the identification is essentially certain. (Corwin writes that it is also verified by a print of the original plate.)
Note About LEDA Search: A search of LEDA for IC 2310 does not recognize the designation, and returns no result.
DSS image of region near the star listed as IC 2310, also showing IC 2309
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on IC 2310, also showing IC 2309

WORKING HERE: Need to finish, clean up images
IC 2311
(= PGC 23304 = ESO 495-002 = MCG -04-20-007)

Discovered (Feb 16, 1898) by
Herbert Howe
A magnitude 11.5 elliptical galaxy (type E0/1) in Puppis (RA 08 18 46.0, Dec -25 22 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2311 (Howe list I (#8), 1860 RA 08 12 49, NPD 114 56.1) is "pretty bright, very small, round, a little brighter middle, 6 arcmin north of III 288," WH III 288 being NGC 2566. The position precesses to RA 08 18 46.4, Dec -25 22 13, barely east of the center of the galaxy listed above and well within its eastern outline, the description is perfect and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 2105 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), IC 2311 is about 95 to 100 million light-years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 75 to 150 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.0 by 1.9 arcmin (from the images below, counting the fainter outer regions), the galaxy is about 205 thousand light-years across.
PanSTARRS image of region near elliptical galaxy IC 2311, also showing PGC 23301
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on IC 2311, also showing PGC 23301 (NGC 2566 is just south of the field)
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy IC 2311
Below, a 3.25 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
(As in the case of the PanSTARRS images, this image will be touched up ASAP)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy IC 2311, also showing most of PGC 23301

WORKING HERE
PGC 23301
(= MCG -04-20-006)

Not an IC object but listed here as a possible companion of
IC 2311
A magnitude 17(?) elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Puppis (RA 08 18 39.5, Dec -25 23 09)
Physical Information: Though listed as a possible companion of IC 2311, its 700 km/sec lower recessional velocity makes that unlikely; as indicated by its Hubble Flow distance, it is almost certainly a foreground galaxy.
LEDA.43 x .43 arcmin; NED .2 x .2 arcmin, BOTH 3K Vr 1401 km/sec
(PanSTARRS and Carnegie images to be added)

IC 2312 (= PGC 1561585 + PGC 1561719)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf
A pair of galaxies in Cancer (RA 08 20 53.4, Dec +18 30 32)
and a magnitude 15.4 (northeastern) and 17.7 (southern) pair of stars flanking the galaxies
PGC 1561585 = A magnitude 16.2 spiral galaxy (type (R')Sbc? pec) at RA 08 20 53.3, Dec +18 30 31
PGC 1561719 = A magnitude 17.8 spiral galaxy (type S? pec) at RA 08 20 53.6, Dec +18 30 44
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2312 (Wolf list I #76, 1860 RA 08 12 51, NPD 71 03.2) is "very faint, small, extended 45°, diffuse, very little brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 08 20 53.7, Dec +18 30 30, less than 0.1 arcmin east of the center of the brighter member of the pair and depite its small size, almost within its outline, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain. However, per Corwin, on Wolf's plate both the galaxies and the two stars near them appear as a single blended image, so the stars are actually part of IC 2312, as shown above. (GAIA2 confirms the stellar nature of the stars, and the extragalactic nature of the galaxies.)
Physical Information: Since the two galaxies appear as a single image on Wolf's plate, they are both considered part of IC 2312; and since they have similar recessional velocities, they are probably a physical pair. Given that, the appropriate recessional velocity to use for estimating their Hubble Flow distance is their average recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Backround. For the southern galaxy that value is 25660 km/sec, while for the northern one it is 25560 km/sec, yielding an average recessional velocity of about 25610 km/sec. Using that value (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that IC 2312 is about 1190 to 1195 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1080 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1125 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin for the larger galaxy and about 0.15 by 0.1 arcmin for the smaller one (from the images below), the larger galaxy is about 105 thousand light-years across, and the smaller one is about 45 thousand light-years across.
Designation Problem: Based on their images and listed properties, LEDA and NED have the designations of the galaxies reversed. Both show the southern galaxy as larger, brighter, and with the slightly higher recessional velocity, but LEDA calls that PGC 1561585, and NED calls it PGC 1561719. In this part of the extended PGC, more northern galaxies are given higher numbers, so in LEDA the designations and data appear to be correct, but in NED they are probably assigned to the wrong galaxies.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies PGC 1561585 and PGC 1561719, and their two flanking stars, all four of which comprise IC 2312
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on IC 2312
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxies and stars which comprise IC 2312
SDSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 1561585 and PGC 1561719, and the two stars flanking them, all four of which comprise IC 2312

IC 2313
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-77)
A magnitude 14(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 20 54.6, Dec +18 30 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2313 (Wolf list I #77, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2314
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-78)
A pair of magnitude 16.4 and 16.6 stars in Cancer (RA 08 21 03.6, Dec +18 45 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2314 (Wolf list I #78, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2315
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-79)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 10.7, Dec +18 54 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2315 (Wolf list I #79, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2316
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-80)
A pair of magnitude 15.5 and 15.6 stars in Cancer (RA 08 21 15.2, Dec +19 45 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2316 (Wolf list I #80, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2317
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-81)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 21.5, Dec +18 50 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2317 (Wolf list I #81, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2318
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-83)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 32.8, Dec +18 37 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2318 (Wolf list I #83, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information: (Noted as 2 stars following)

IC 2319
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-84)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 33.0, Dec +18 28 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2319 (Wolf list I #84, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2320
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-85)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 35.4, Dec +18 40 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2320 (Wolf list I #85, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2321
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-86)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 39.2, Dec +18 28 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2321 (Wolf list I #86, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2322
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-87)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 39.0, Dec +18 29 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2322 (Wolf list I #87, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2323
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-88)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 41.2, Dec +18 36 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2323 (Wolf list I #88, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2324
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-89)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 21 58.7, Dec +19 11 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2324 (Wolf list I #89, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2325
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-90)
A lost or nonexistent object in Cancer (RA 08 22 08.7, Dec +18 54 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2325 (Wolf list I #90, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information: (Probably a plate defect)

IC 2326
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-91)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 22 12.1, Dec +19 00 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2326 (Wolf list I #91, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2327 (= PGC 23447)
Discovered (Feb 15, 1898) by
Stephane Javelle (1035)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa??) in Hydra (RA 08 21 28.0, Dec +03 10 09)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2328
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-92)
A lost or nonexistent object in Cancer (RA 08 22 17.4, Dec +19 36 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2328 (Wolf list I #92, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2329 (= PGC 23483)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-93)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sd??) in Cancer (RA 08 22 19.5, Dec +19 24 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2329 (Wolf list I #93, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 0.4 arcmin?

IC 2330
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-94)
A lost or nonexistent object in Cancer (RA 08 22 23.1, Dec +18 51 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2330 (Wolf list I #94, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2331
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-95)
A magnitude 16.8 star in Cancer (RA 08 22 35.2, Dec +19 40 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2331 (Wolf list I #95, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

Corwin also lists a magnitude 23 galaxy (virtually invisible in all images) at RA 08 22 34.7, Dec +19 40 55

IC 2332
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-96)
A magnitude 14(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 22 39.7, Dec +19 55 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2332 (Wolf list I #96, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2333
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-97)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 01.0, Dec +19 04 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2333 (Wolf list I #97, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2334
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-98)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 00.0, Dec +18 36 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2334 (Wolf list I #98, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2335 (= PGC 1591222)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-99)
A magnitude 15.2 elliptical galaxy (type E3??) in Cancer (RA 08 23 07.1, Dec +19 24 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2335 (Wolf list I #99, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?

IC 2336
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-100)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 19.1, Dec +18 32 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2336 (Wolf list I #100, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2337 (= PGC 23529)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-101)
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Cancer (RA 08 23 20.3, Dec +18 32 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2337 (Wolf list I #101, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin?

IC 2338 (= PGC 23542, and with
IC 2339 = Arp 247)
Discovered (Mar 2, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (1036)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)cd pec) in Cancer (RA 08 23 32.7, Dec +21 20 16)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin. Used by the Arp Atlas (with IC 2339 as an example of a galaxy with fission.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies IC 2338 and IC 2339, which comprise Arp 247
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2338 and 2339
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the pair, also showing IC 2341
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies IC 2338 and IC 2339, which comprise Arp 247, also showing IC 2341

IC 2339 (= PGC 23545, and with
IC 2338 = Arp 247)
Discovered (Mar 2, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (1037)
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c pec) in Cancer (RA 08 23 34.2, Dec +21 20 51)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.55 arcmin. Used by the Arp Atlas (with IC 2338 (which see for images) as an example of a galaxy with fission.

IC 2340 (= PGC 23544)
Discovered (Mar 1, 1900) by
Stephane Javelle (1038)
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Cancer (RA 08 23 30.2, Dec +18 44 58)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

IC 2341 (= PGC 23552)
Discovered (Mar 2, 1896) by
Stephane Javelle (1039)
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0??) in Cancer (RA 08 23 41.4, Dec +21 26 06)
Historical Identification:
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin?

IC 2342
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-103)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 32.2, Dec +18 34 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2342 (Wolf list I #103, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2343
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-104)
A magnitude 14(?) star in Cancer (RA 08 23 32.2, Dec +18 34 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2343 (Wolf list I #104, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information: (An apparent pair with IC 2342)

IC 2344
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-105)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 23 54.9, Dec +18 39 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2344 (Wolf list I #105, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2345
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-106)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 24 08.5, Dec +19 57 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2345 (Wolf list I #106, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2346
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-107)
A pair of stars in Cancer (RA 08 24 10.5, Dec +19 42 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2346 (Wolf list I #107, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2347
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-108)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 24 14.0, Dec +18 46 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2347 (Wolf list I #108, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:

IC 2348 (= PGC 23589)
Discovered (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-109)
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type SABa(rs)?) in Cancer (RA 08 24 20.2, Dec +20 32 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2348 (Wolf list I #109, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.65 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy IC 2348
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of IC 2348
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy IC 2348

IC 2349
Recorded (Feb 13, 1901) by
Max Wolf (1-110)
A star in Cancer (RA 08 24 17.1, Dec +19 00 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, IC 2349 (Wolf list I #110, 1860 RA , NPD ) is
Physical Information:
Celestial Atlas
(IC 2250 - 2299) ←IC Objects: IC 2300 - 2349→ (IC 2350 - 2399)