Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1250 - 1299) ←NGC Objects: NGC 1300 - 1349→ (NGC 1350 - 1399)
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Page last updated Feb 8, 2022
Added link for HST image of 1317
Updated discovery information for NGC 1330, 1335, 1338, 1340, 1344 and 1346
Updated Corwin positions, Steinicke physical data
WORKING: see if can find missing dates for Swift, Stewart
Working on updates for NGC 1316, 17 and 18 (Dreyer/Steinicke/Gottlieb done)
WORKING 1333: check original NGC note
Updated formatting, adding basic pix, captions, tags

NGC 1300
(= PGC 12412 = = UGCA 66 = ESO 547-031 = MCG -03-09-018)

Discovered (Dec 11, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.4 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 03 19 41.0, Dec -19 24 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1300 (= GC 689 = JH 2522, 1860 RA 03 13 23, NPD 109 55.1) is "considerably bright, very large, very much extended, pretty suddenly very much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 19 42.7, Dec -19 24 30, within the northern rim of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1430 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 1300 is about 65 to 70 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 45 to 75 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 6.45 by 5.5 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 125 thousand light years across.
Usage By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 1300 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type SB(s)b. The classification type listed above is taken from the NED, and given the images below seems as reasonable as the de Vaucouleurs classification.
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1300 superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide NOAO/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1300
Below, a 7 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit above & below Hillary Mathis/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1300
Below, a 6.4 arcmin wide infrared image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESO, P. Grosbøl)
ESO infrared image of spiral galaxy NGC 1300
Below, a 3 by 5.75 arcmin wide HST image of the central galaxy (with North on right to allow for greater detail)
(Image Credit NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1300

NGC 1301
(= PGC 12521 = ESO 547-032 = MCG -03-09-022)

Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Eridanus (RA 03 20 35.3, Dec -18 42 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1301 (Ormond Stone list I (#103), 1860 RA 03 13 40, NPD 109 03.6) is "very faint, much extended 135░".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1301
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1301
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1301

NGC 1302
(= PGC 12431 = ESO 481-020 = MCG -04-08-058)

Discovered (February, 1885) by
Edward Barnard
A magnitude 10.7 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB(r)0/a?) in Fornax (RA 03 19 51.2, Dec -26 03 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1302 (Barnard, 1860 RA 03 13 50, NPD 116 34.3) is "small, round, pretty suddenly very much brighter middle, 9th magnitude star 1 arcmin northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.9 by 3.7 arcmin?
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 1302 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type (R2')SAB(rs)0/a.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1302
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1302
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1302

NGC 1303
(= PGC 12527 = MCG -01-09-029)

Discovered (Oct 28, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 20 40.8, Dec -07 23 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1303 (= GC 5310, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 13 51, NPD 97 54.0) is "very faint, several stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1303
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1303
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1303

NGC 1304 (perhaps =
NGC 1307)
(= PGC 12575 = MCG -01-09-030)

Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1304)
Recorded (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1307)
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 21 12.8, Dec -04 35 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1304 (= GC 690 = WH III 444, 1860 RA 03 14 08, NPD 95 08.2) is "extremely faint, very small". The position precesses to RA 03 21 06.1, Dec -04 37 46, only 3 arcmin southwest of the most likely candidate, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is reasonably certain. (The possible duplicate listing as NGC 1307 is discussed at that entry.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1304
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1304
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1304

NGC 1305
(= PGC 12582 = UGC 2697 = CGCG 390-072 = MCG +00-09-069)

Discovered (Jan 4, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 21 23.0, Dec -02 19 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1305 (= GC 5311, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 14 20, NPD 92 48.3) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, 16th magnitude star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1305
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1305
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1305

NGC 1306
(= PGC 12559 = ESO 481-023)

Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Fornax (RA 03 21 03.0, Dec -25 30 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1306 (Ormond Stone list I (#104), 1860 RA 03 14 45, NPD 116 02.6) is "very faint, very small, gradually brighter middle, magnitude 10.5 star 4 arcmin to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1306
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1306
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1306

NGC 1307 (probably =
NGC 1304)
(= PGC 12575 = MCG -01-09-030)

Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1304)
Recorded (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1307)
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 21 12.8, Dec -04 35 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1307 (Leavenworth list II (#366), 1860 RA 03 15 19, NPD 95 03.5) is "extremely faint, very small, round, 9.5 magnitude star to northeast". The position precesses to RA 03 22 17.2, Dec -04 33 15, a couple of arcmin southwest of PGC 12637, a 16th magnitude galaxy, and that was presumed to be NGC 1307 by some investigators. However, most references have accepted Corwin's suggestion that Leavenworth's object is a misrecording of NGC 1304, with a (fairly common) reversal of the nearby star's direction and an overestimate of its brightness. That argument is not totally convincing, but PGC 12637 is so faint that it is unlikely that Leavenworth could have seen it, and if he could he would certainly have seen NGC 1304 while "sweeping" eastward across the sky (that is, watching the sky move westward through the field of view of his telescope). So it seems probable that Corwin's suggestion is correct, or that Leavenworth's object is lost.
Physical Information: Given the possible duplicate entry, see NGC 1304 for anything else.
DSS image showing the NGC position for NGC 1307, also showing NGC 1304 and PGC 12637
Above, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image showing the NGC position for NGC 1307
Also shown are NGC 1304 and PGC 12637

PGC 12637 (not =
NGC 1307)
Not an NGC object but listed here since once mistaken for NGC 1307
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in in Eridanus (RA 03 22 22.2, Dec -04 32 07)
Historical Misidentification: As discussed in the entry for NGC 1307, its recorded position is close to PGC 12637; but that object is too faint to have been seen by Francis Leavenworth, so its identification as NGC 1307 is certainly wrong.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8700 km/sec, PGC 12637 is about 400 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.65 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 70 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12637, sometimes mistaken for NGC 1307
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12637
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12637, sometimes mistaken for NGC 1307

NGC 1308
(= PGC 12643 = MCG -01-09-032)

Discovered (Sep 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 22 28.5, Dec -02 45 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1308 (= GC 691 = WH III 568, 1860 RA 03 15 26, NPD 93 15.7) is "extremely faint, small, irregular figure, among 3 or 4 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1308
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1308
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1308

NGC 1309
(= PGC 12626 = MCG -03-09-028)

Discovered (Oct 3, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 10, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc?) in in Eridanus (RA 03 22 06.6, Dec -15 24 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1309 (= GC 692 = JH 2523 = WH I 106, 1860 RA 03 15 36, NPD 105 54.2) is "considerably bright, considerably large, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle, 8th magnitude star 4 arcmin southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 2.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1309 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1309
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1309
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy
(Image Credit NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) & A. Riess (STScI))
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1309

NGC 1310
(= PGC 12569 = ESO 357-019 = MCG -06-08-004)

Discovered (Oct 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type (R?)SA(s)bc?) in Fornax (RA 03 21 03.4, Dec -37 06 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1310 (= GC 693 = JH 2524, 1860 RA 03 15 42, NPD 127 38.6) is "a globular cluster, very faint, pretty large, round, very gradually very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.2 by 3.1 arcmin including the fainter northern and southern regions, and about 3.2 by 2.2 arcmin for the more obvious structure (from the images below). A member of the Fornax Cluster (FCC 13). Almost certainly a starburst galaxy.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1310
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1310
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1310
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (a considerable enlargement of a small portion of a much larger image)
(Image Credit & © Martin Pugh Astrophotography image of NGC 1316; used by permission)

Martin Pugh Astrophotography image of spiral galaxy NGC 1310
*Note to self: Partial 'raw' HST image also available*

NGC 1311
(= PGC 12460 = ESO 200-007)

Discovered (Dec 24, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Horologium (RA 03 20 07.1, Dec -52 11 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1311 (= GC 694 = JH 2525, 1860 RA 03 16 00, NPD 142 41.0) is "faint, pretty large, much extended 37░, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 0.8 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1311
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1311
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1311
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 1311

NGC 1312
Recorded (Dec 16, 1859) by
Sidney Coolidge
A pair of stars in Taurus (RA 03 23 41.8, Dec +01 11 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1312 (= GC 5061, Sidney Coolidge (#5, HN 23), 1860 RA 03 16 29, NPD 89 19.1) is "faint". Per Corwin, misidentified as PGC 12682 in the RC3, but there is no doubt that it is actually the pair of stars listed above.
Physical Information: The southwestern star is about magnitude 12.7, while the northeastern one is about magnitude 14.8.
SDSS image centered on the pair of stars listed as NGC 1312
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1312

PGC 12682 (not =
NGC 1312)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 1312
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type (R)SBb?) in Taurus (RA 03 23 29.8, Dec +01 19 27)
Historical Identification: PGC 12682 was misidentified as NGC 1312 in the RC3 and as a result it may still be misidentified in other places; so this entry serves as a warning about that.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12682, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1312
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12682
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12682, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 1312

NGC 1313
(= PGC 12286 = ESO 082-011)

Discovered (Sep 27, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Nov 2, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.7 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)d?) in Reticulum (RA 03 18 16.0, Dec -66 29 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1313 (= GC 695 = JH 2528, Dunlop 206 (& 205 and 207?), 1860 RA 03 16 34, NPD 156 59.6) is "pretty bright, large, extended, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: NGC 1313 is a "starburst" galaxy, in which unusually large numbers of hot, bright young stars are forming. Most such galaxies have recently suffered collisions or near-collisions with neighboring galaxies, but NGC 1313 appears to be essentially alone. It is possible that as in the case of our nearest neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy, which appears to have been greatly affected by a collision with a nearby dwarf elliptical, NGC 1313 was involved with a much smaller galaxy which is hidden from view behind it; but barring such an unlikely explanation, there is no good model currently able to explain its unusually active structure. NGC 1313's recessional velocity of only 470 km/sec is too small to give a reliable distance based on the Universal expansion, but ignoring that fact, the corresponding distance of about 20 million light years is in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 10 to 15 million light years. Using a distance of 15 million light years its apparent size of 9.1 by 6.9 arcmin would make it about 40 thousand light years across.
Note About "Companions": A few of the scattered star-froming regions in NGC 1313 have been listed as possible companion galaxies, rather than as part of NGC 1313 itself; and just as our Milky Way Galaxy has a number of small galaxies that are merging with it (and several "star streams" in our galaxy are the remnants of such galaxies that have already merged with it), some of the "knots" in NGC 1313 may be similar "companions"; but there is no present way to determine whether that is true for any of NGC 1313's star-forming regions, or any current reason to treat any of them as separate objects.
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 1313 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type SB(s)dm.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1313
Above, an 18 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1313 and its widely scattered star-forming regions
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of the central regions in the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1313
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy with nearly the same orientation
(Image Credit T.A. Rector/University of Alaska Anchorage, T. Abbott and AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1313
Below, a ? arcmin wide image emphasizing the brighter central portion of the galaxy
(Image Credit Henri Boffin (ESO), FORS1, 8.2-meter VLT, ESO)
ESO image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 1313
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the innermost 10000 light years near the central bar
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, Anne Pellerin (STScI))
HST image of innermost portion of spiral galaxy NGC 1313

PGC 12457
(= ESO 083-001 = "NGC 1313A")

Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 1313A
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Reticulum (RA 03 20 05.7, Dec -66 42 04)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.25 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12457, also known as NGC 1313A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12457
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12457, also known as NGC 1313A

NGC 1314
(= PGC 12650 = MCG -01-09-033)

Discovered (Jan 18, 1887) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)d?) in Eridanus (RA 03 22 41.2, Dec -04 11 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1314 (Leavenworth list II (#367), 1860 RA 03 16 48, NPD 94 40.5) is "a 10th magnitude star with an extremely faint, considerably large, extended nebula to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1314
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1314
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1314

NGC 1315
(= PGC 12671 = ESO 548-003 = MCG -04-09-002)

Discovered (Nov 13, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec?) in Eridanus (RA 03 23 06.6, Dec -21 22 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1315 (= GC 696 = JH 2526, 1860 RA 03 16 55, NPD 111 52.3) is "pretty bright, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.7 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1315
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1315
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1315

WORKING HERE: PARTIALLY UPDATED
NGC 1316 (=
Arp 154), Fornax A
(= PGC 12651 = ESO 357-022 = MCG -06-08-005)

Discovered (Sep 2, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (Oct 22, 1835) by John Herschel
Also observed (Feb 13, 1887) by Lewis Swift (but misidentified as Comet 1887 I)
Also observed (Nov 15, 1887) by Edward Barnard (while searching for Swift's VI-14 and VI-15)
A magnitude 8.5 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0░(s) pec) in Fornax (RA 03 22 41.7, Dec -37 12 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1316 (= GC 697 = JH 2527, Dunlop #548, 1860 RA 03 17 20, NPD 127 43.7) is "very bright, considerably large, very little extended, very suddenly very much brighter middle and nucleus." The position precesses to RA 03 22 40.4, Dec -37 13 38, well within the southern half of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: See NGC 1392 for a discussion of Swift and Barnard's observations.
Use By The Arp Atlas: NGC 1316 is used by the Arp Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as an example of disturbed galaxies with interior absorption, with the note "For(nax) A radio source. Short exposure to show absorption in center." Arp's image only shows the core of the galaxy, so strictly speaking that is Arp 154, not the entire region shown in the wide-field images below.
Physical Information: NGC 1316 is a member (FCC 21) of the Fornax Cluster of galaxies. Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1695 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), it is about 75 to 80 million light-years away, in almost inevitable agreement with widely-varying redshift-independent distance estimates of about 35 to 180 million light-years. However, the most modern distance estimate techniques (based on studies of surface brightness fluctuations and planetary nebula luminosity functions) yield a distance (about 60 to 65 million light-years) very close to the median of the redshift-independent distance estimates (55 to 60 million light-years), suggesting that the best "single" estimate of the galaxy's distance is about 60 million light-years. Given that and an apparent size of about ? arcmin for the core of the galaxy, about ? arcmin for its widely scattered visible outliers, and nearly a degree for its radio emission (from the images below), the central galaxy is about ? thousand light-years across, its visible features span about ? thousand light-years, and its radio emissions suggest an overall size of about ? thousand light-years for regions directly associated with the galaxy.
 NGC 1316 is the fourth-brightest radio source in the sky (whence the name "Fornax A"), and is undoubtedly the result of the merger of several galaxies at some time in the past. It is thought to be interacting with its companion, NGC 1317, but the small mass of that galaxy cannot be responsible for the region filled with scattered visual features, let alone the enormous region shown in radio images, so they are undoubtedly the result of past mergers, rather than whatever interaction is still ongoing.
Apparent size 11.0 by 7.2 arcmin for the central galaxy, but portions scattered by its interaction with NGC 1317 cover nearly 20 arcmin, and its radio-emission lobes cover nearly a degree.
NOTE TO SELF: SEVERAL IMAGE LINKS BROKEN; NEED TO FIX IF POSSIBLE
Martin Pugh Astrophotography wide-field image of peculiar lenticular galaxy NGC 1316, showing its outermost regions, overlaid on a DSS image to fill in regions not otherwise covered; also shown is NGC 1317
Above, a 30 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 1316, also showing NGC 1317
(Image Credit & © Martin Pugh Astrophotography image used by permission, overlaid on DSS background)
Below, a 22 arcmin wide region of the pair of galaxies (Image Credit as above)
Martin Pugh Astrophotography image of peculiar lenticular galaxy NGC 1316, showing its outermost regions; also shown is NGC 1317
Below, a 10 arcmin wide region of the central region of NGC 1316 (Image Credit as above)
Martin Pugh Astrophotography image of peculiar lenticular galaxy NGC 1316's central region
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy's core (Image Credit NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))
HST image of central portion of lenticular galaxy NGC 1316
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the core (Image Credit Carl Grillmair (CalTech) and NASA)
HST image of part of central portion of lenticular galaxy NGC 1316
Below, a degree wide composite of visual and radio images of the region (Image Credit Fomalont et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF)
Composite of visual and radio 'images' of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1316, also showing NGC 1317

PGC 12686
(= MCG -06-08-008= "NGC 1316A")

Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 1316A
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Fornax (RA 03 23 37.9, Dec -36 54 14)
Physical Information: PGC 12686 is an apparent member (FCC 186) of the Fornax Cluster, but is actually many times further away. Based on a recessional velocity of 12230 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that it is about 570 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 545 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 555 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about ? thousand light years across.
LEDA B 14.67, I 13.22 -> V 14(?)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12686, also known as NGC 1316A, also showing PGC 12687 (also known as NGC 1316B) and PGC 12688
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12686, also showing PGC 12687 and PGC 12688
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image showing the three galaxies
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12686, also known as NGC 1316A, also showing PGC 12687 (also known as NGC 1316B) and PGC 12688

PGC 12688
(= PGC 95473 = MCG -06-08-007)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of "
NGC 1316A"
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Fornax (RA 03 23 38.2, Dec -36 53 15)
Physical Information: PGC 12688 is an apparent member (FCC 187) of the Fornax Cluster, but is actually many times further away. Based on a recessional velocity of 12315 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that it is about 575 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 545 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, almost 560 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin(from the images at PGC 12686) the galaxy is about 100 thousand light years across. It is a possible companion of PGC 12686 (which see for images).
LEDA B 15.4, I 14.1 -> V 15(?)

PGC 12687
(= PGC 95472 = MCG -06-08-009 = "NGC 1316B")

Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 1316B
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sbc(s)?) in
Fornax (RA 03 23 39.6, Dec -36 54 31)
Physical Information: PGC 12687 is an apparent member (FCC 192) of the Fornax Cluster, but is actually many times further away. Based on a recessional velocity of 19610 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that it is about 915 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the Universal expansion during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 845 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 875 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images at PGC 12686) the galaxy is about ? thousand light years across. It is an optical double with PGC 12686, which see for images.

PGC 12769
(= ESO 357-027 = MCG -06-08-012= "NGC 1316C")

Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 1316C
A 1magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Fornax (RA 03 24 58.4, Dec -37 00 35)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below). A member of the Fornax Cluster (FCC 33).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 12769, also known as NGC 1316C
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12769
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 12769, also known as NGC 1316C

NGC 1317 (=
NGC 1318 = NGC 1392)
(= PGC 12653 = ESO 357-023 = MCG -06-08-006)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1317)
Also observed (Oct 22, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1317)
"Discovered" (Jan 19, 1865) by Julius Schmidt (and later listed as NGC 1318)
"Discovered" (Feb 13, 1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1392)
Also observed (Nov 15, 1887) by Edward Barnard (while searching for Swift's object)
A magnitude 11.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)a?) in Fornax (RA 03 22 44.3, Dec -37 06 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1317 (= GC 698 = JH 2529, Dunlop #547, 1860 RA 03 17 23, NPD 127 36.4) is "pretty bright, pretty small, pretty suddenly brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 03 22 43.8, Dec -37 06 20, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Designation Notes: See NGC 1318 for a discussion of its duplication of NGC 1317. See NGC 1392 for a discussion of its duplication of NGC 1317, and the ESO and RNGC misidentifications of NGC 1392.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.4 by 3.2 arcmin (from the images below). A member of the Fornax Cluster (FCC 22). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type (R')SAB(rl)a.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1317
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 1317; see NGC 1316 for a wide-field image
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
Partially processed monochrome HST image of the core of spiral galaxy NGC 1317
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the part of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Lee and the PHANGS-HST Team)
(Image to be added ASAP)

NGC 1318 (=
NGC 1317 = NGC 1392)
(= PGC 12653 = ESO 357-023 = MCG -06-08-006)

Discovered (Nov 24, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 1317)
Also observed (Oct 22, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1317)
"Discovered" (Jan 19, 1865) by Julius Schmidt (and later listed as NGC 1318)
"Discovered" (Feb 13, 1887) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 1392)
Also observed (Nov 15, 1887) by Edward Barnard (while searching for Swift's object)
A magnitude 11.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)a?) in Fornax (RA 03 22 44.3, Dec -37 06 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1318 (= GC 5312, Julius Schmidt (#a), 1860 RA 03 17 23, NPD 127 37.1) is "faint." The position is within 0.7 arcmin of the one Dreyer listed for NGC 1317 (which see for images) and falls on the same galaxy, so the equality of the two listings is inescapable. The question is, how did Schmidt fail to notice that when he was using John Herschel's catalog as a reference, and why did Dreyer create two entries when only one was required? Per Corwin, the answer probably lies in a typographical error in the text of Herschel's GC that put JH 2529 (= NGC 1317) twenty degrees north of its actual position. Herschel noticed the error while proofreading the publication, and corrected it in the errata at its end, but Schmidt must not have thought to check the errata, and therefore thought he had found a new nebula. And since Dreyer didn't have the time to check all the reports he collected against the actual sky, he accepted Schmidt's claim that there was another nebula in the region. So though odd, the error is understandable. What seems harder to understand is why no one noticed it for decades, leading to the presumption that NGC 1318 was "lost", instead of the realization that it was 'right there', in the form of NGC 1317 (de Vaucouleurs was the first to note the identity, more than half a century afterward). For those who wonder why I cover historical information in so much detail, this sort of thing is the reason; hopefully the information provided in these pages will help future observers avoid some confusion about the various NGC/IC objects and their proper identification.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1317 for anything else.

NGC 1319
(= PGC 12708 = ESO 548-006 = MCG -04-09-003)

Discovered (Nov 13, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 23 56.5, Dec -21 31 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1319 (= GC 699 = JH 2533, 1860 RA 03 17 46, NPD 112 01.0) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle, western of 2", the other being NGC 1325.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1319, also showing part of NGC 1325
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1319, also showing part of NGC 1325
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1319

NGC 1320
(= PGC 12756 = MCG -01-09-036)

Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 16, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Eridanus (RA 03 24 48.7, Dec -03 02 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1320 (= GC 700 = JH 298 = JH 2530 = WH III 197, 1860 RA 03 17 49, NPD 93 32.1) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2665 km/sec, NGC 1320 is about 125 million light years away, in perfect agreement with a lone redshift-independent distance estimate of the same value. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.6 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 55 to 60 thousand light years across. (There is another recessional velocity measurement of 4050 km/sec, but that would put the galaxy at 190 million light years distance, which seems unlikely given the other distance estimates; so that measurement may have been inadvertently attributed to the wrong object.) A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2). An apparent companion of NGC 1321.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1320
Above, a 2 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1320 (see NGC 1321 for a wide-field view)
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
(This is a 'raw' image. Most of the bright spots and all of the bright lines are cosmic ray tracks.)
A 'raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 1320

NGC 1321
(= PGC 12755 = MCG -01-09-035)

Discovered (Sep 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 16, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (S0/a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 24 48.6, Dec -03 00 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1321 (= GC 701 = JH 297 = JH 2531 = WH III 196, 1860 RA 03 17 49, NPD 93 30.5) is "faint, small, extended east-west, double or binuclear".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2850 km/sec, NGC 1321 is about 130 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 35 thousand light years across. An apparent companion of NGC 1320. Low resolution images show an elliptical outline running east and west, but higher resolution images show a bright core running nearly at right angles to that, suggesting a complex structure; unfortunately all available images overexpose the brighter regions and underexpose the fainter ones, or overexpose the entire galaxy, making it difficult to show that structure. (I will try to address that problem in the next iteration of this page.)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1321, also showing NGC 1320 and NGC 1322
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1321, also showing NGC 1320 and 1322
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1321

NGC 1322
(= PGC 12761 = MCG -01-09-037)

Discovered (Oct 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 24 54.7, Dec -02 55 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1322 (= GC 702 = JH 2532, 1860 RA 03 17 53, NPD 93 25.1) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6075 km/sec, NGC 1322 is about 280 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 80 thousand light years across.
NED 3K Vr 6243 km/sec
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1322, also showing NGC 1321 and NGC 1323
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1322, also showing NGC 1321 and 1323
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1322

PGC 1079567
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 1322
A magnitude ? elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Eridanus (RA 03 24 59.9, Dec -02 56 12)
Physical Information:
LEDA B 16.82, I 15.17 -> V (16 - 16.5)?; NED 16.82(B), .26 x .24 arcmin, 3K Vr 5833 km/sec, so possibly but probably not an actual companion of 1322

NGC 1323
(= PGC 12764)

Discovered (Dec 19, 1849) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 15.1 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 24 56.1, Dec -02 49 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1323 (= GC 703, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 03 17 53, NPD 93 19.2) is "extremely faint, extremely small, 13th magnitude star 25▒ arcsec to southwest".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below, including the extensions to the west and east northeast).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1323
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1323, also showing NGC 1322
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1323

NGC 1324
(= PGC 12772 = MCG -01-09-038)

Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 28, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Eridanus (RA 03 25 01.7, Dec -05 44 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1324 (= GC 704 = JH 299 = WH III 445, 1860 RA 03 18 05, NPD 96 14.2) is "very faint, pretty small, pretty much extended".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5670 km/sec, NGC 1324 is about 265 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance measurements of 250 to 260 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 0.8 arcmin, it is about 160 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1324
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1324
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1324

NGC 1325
(= PGC 12737 = UGCA 70 = ESO 548-007 = MCG -04-09-004)

Discovered (Dec 19, 1799) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 11, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.5 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 03 24 25.6, Dec -21 32 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1325 (= GC 705 = JH 2534 = WH IV 77, 1860 RA 03 18 18, NPD 112 01.8) is "faint, much extended 239░, cometic, 9.5 magnitude star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.8 by 1.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1325
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1325
Below, a 5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1325
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1325

PGC 12754
(= ESO 548-010 = MCG -04-09-006 = "NGC 1325A")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 1325A
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)cd?) in
Eridanus (RA 03 24 48.5, Dec -21 20 12)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.3 by 2.2 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12754, sometimes called NGC 1325A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12754
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12754, sometimes called NGC 1325A

NGC 1326
(= PGC 12709 = ESO 357-026 = MCG -06-08-011)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1837) by
John Herschel
An 11th- magnitude 10.5 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(rs)a? pec) in Fornax (RA 03 23 56.4, Dec -36 27 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1326 (= GC 706 = JH 2535, 1860 RA 03 18 38, NPD 126 58.2) is "a planetary nebula? pretty small, very suddenly very much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.7 by 3.7 arcmin (from the images below). A member (FCC 29) of the Fornax Cluster. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type (R1)SAB(r)0/a.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1326
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1326
Below, a 5.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1326
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of the central part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of central portion of lenticular galaxy NGC 1326

PGC 12783
(= ESO 357-028 = MCG -06-08-013 = "NGC 1326A")

Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 1326A
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in
Fornax (RA 03 25 08.5, Dec -36 21 50)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1830 km/sec, PGC 12783 is about 85 million light years away, in poor agreement with fairly convincing redshift-independent distance estimates of 50 to 65 million light years, indicating that the galaxy has a peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocity of nearly 600 km/sec in excess of the Hubble expansion velocity. Assuming a distance of 60 million light years its apparent size of 1.9 by 1.7 arcmin(?) corresponds to about 35 thousand light years. It appears to be part of an interacting pair with PGC 12788 (which see for more about that), but whether they are at the same distance is very uncertain. The galaxy is listed as a member (FCC 37) of the Fornax Cluster, but unless it has a very large peculiar velocity it probably lies beyond the Cluster.
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12783 and the western end of spiral galaxy PGC 12788
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 12783 and part of PGC 12788 (which see for more images)
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy PGC 12783, also known as NGC 1326A

PGC 12788
(= ESO 357-029 = MCG -06-08-014 = "NGC 1326B")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 1326B
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in
Fornax (RA 03 25 20.6, Dec -36 23 15)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1000 km/sec, PGC 12788 is about 45 million light years away, in fair agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of 55 million light years. Assuming an intermediate distance of about 50 million light years its apparent size of 3.6 by 1.1 arcmin(?) corresponds to about 50 thousand light years. It appears to be part of an interacting pair with PGC 12783, but their recessional velocities differ by nearly a factor of two, and even redshift-independent distance estimates suggest they are millions of light years apart. However, they could be at the same distance of around 50 or so million light years, providing that they are passing through the same region at the current time, and separating at a rate of nearly a thousand km/sec. Only far better redshift-independent distance estimates can resolve the question. PGC 12788 is listed as a member (FCC 39) of the Fornax Cluster, but if so it would be among the closest members of the cluster.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies PGC 12783, also known as NGC 1326A, and PGC 12788, also known as NGC 1326B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12788 and PGC 12783
Below, a 5 arcmin wide DSS image of the apparent pair
DSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 12783, also known as NGC 1326A, and PGC 12788, also known as NGC 1326B

NGC 1327
(probably = PGC 12795 = ESO 481-026 = MCG -04-09-008)

Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
Probably not observed (date? Bruce plate 4092) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)b?) in Fornax (RA 03 25 23.2, Dec -25 40 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1327 (Ormond Stone list I (#105), 1860 RA 03 18 45, NPD 116 10.5) is "extremely faint, very small, possibly nebulous". The second Index Catalog adds (per DeLisle Stewart) "3 very faint stars close together, no nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 03 24 45.1, Dec -25 40 42, nearly 40 seconds of time due west of (per Corwin) the most likely candidate for what Stone observed. Corwin notes that the positions measured at Leander McCormick Observatory (where Stone worked) were often accurate as to declination, but well to the west of the actual object. So the identification, though of necessity somewhat uncertain, seems more certain than not. However, the situation was confused by Stewart, who assumed that three (12th, 13th and 14th magnitude) stars to the north of Stone's position were what Stone observed. Corwin feels the triplet could not have resembled Stone's description even under the worst of observing conditions, but that the possibility deserves mention, so it is shown in the last image below. (Stewart's trio lies at RA 03 24 48.0, Dec -25 38 26)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12795, which is probably NGC 1327
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 12795
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 12795, which is probably NGC 1327
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region showing NGC 1327, Stone's position, and Stewart's probable triplet
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 12795, which is probably NGC 1327, also showing Stone's position, and the triplet of stars that is thought to be what Stewart observed

NGC 1328
(= PGC 12805)

Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 25 39.1, Dec -04 07 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1328 (Leavenworth list II (#368), 1860 RA 03 19 06, NPD 94 37.5) is "very faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1328
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1328
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1328

NGC 1329
(= PGC 12826 = ESO 548-015 = MCG -03-09-042)

Discovered (Dec 11, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 26 02.6, Dec -17 35 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1329 (= GC 707 = JH 2536, 1860 RA 03 19 40, NPD 108 05.0) is "faint, pretty small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.55 by 1.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1329
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1329
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1329

PGC 12821
Not an NGC object but listed here as a probable companion of
NGC 1329
A magnitude ? galaxy in Eridanus (RA 03 26 00.5, Dec -17 39 27)
Physical Information:
Nearly identical 3K Vr to NGC 1329, so probably a physical companion

NGC 1330
Discovered (Oct 13, 1869) by
╔douard Stephan (but not published)
Re-observed (Dec 14, 1881) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1330)
A group of stars in Perseus (RA 03 29 04.0, Dec +41 40 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1330 (Stephan list XII (#26), 1860 RA 03 19 45, NPD 48 48.7) is some "very faint stars in very faint, small nebulosity". The position precesses to RA 03 29 03.8, Dec +41 40 40, near the center of a small group of faint stars, but there is no nebulosity. Still, per Corwin, there is no doubt that this is the correct identification, as no nebulous objects can be fit to the NGC entry.
Discovery Note: Stephan's date of discovery based on his published data is Dec 14, 1881, which represents the date when he made what he considered an adequate micrometric measurement; but based on Stephan's original notes, Yann Pothier has shown that he actually made his first observation of what became NGC 1330 on Oct 13, 1869, as shown above.
SDSS image of region near the group of stars listed as NGC 1330
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1330
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the group
SDSS image of the group of stars listed as NGC 1330

NGC 1331 (=
IC 324)
(= PGC 12846 = ESO 548-019 = MCG -04-09-012)

Discovered (Dec 19, 1799) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1331)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1888) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 324)
A magnitude 13.4 elliptical galaxy (type dE2) in Eridanus (RA 03 26 28.3, Dec -21 21 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1331 (= GC 708 = WH III 959, 1860 RA 03 19 54, NPD 111 51.0) is "very faint, very small". (See IC 324 for a discussion of the double listing, and problems with occasional misidentification of the object.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1075 km/sec, NGC 1331 is about 50 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 55 to 90 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.65 arcmin (from the image below), it is about 10 to 12 thousand light years across, making it a dwarf elliptical, as indicated by its "type".
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1331
Above, a 1.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of NGC 1331; see NGC 1332 for a wider-field image

NGC 1332
(= PGC 12838 = UGCA 72 = ESO 548-018 = MCG -04-09-011)

Discovered (Dec 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 10.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 26 17.2, Dec -21 20 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1332 (= GC 709 = WH I 60, 1860 RA 03 20 05, NPD 111 49.7) is "very bright, small, extended 114░, suddenly much brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.5 by 1.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1332, also showing NGC 1331
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1332, also showing NGC 1331
Below, a 5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy, also showing part of NGC 1331
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1332 and part of NGC 1331

NGC 1333
(= LBN 741)

Discovered (Dec 31, 1855) by
Eduard Sch÷nfeld
Also observed (Feb 5, 1859) by Horace Tuttle
Also observed (prior to 1862) by Arthur von Auwers
A reflection and emission nebula in Perseus (RA 03 29 15.1, Dec +31 23 28)
Reflection nebula centered on a star at RA 03 29 19.8, Dec +31 24 57
Emission nebula centered near RA 03 29 10.4, Dec +31 21 59
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1333 (= GC 710, Sch÷nfeld, 1860 RA 03 20 41, NPD 59 06.5) is "faint, large, 10th magnitude star to northeast (Auwers No. 17)". (Auwers' note states that the star is 7 seconds of time east and 2 arcmin north of the brightest part of the nebula.)
Discovery Notes: Auwers states that Sch÷nfeld's position is taken from the Bonner Durchmusterung, from which the nebula was discovered. He also credits a discovery by Tuttle, published in the Monthly Notices 19, Number 6. He then confirms Tuttle's description by giving the star's position within the nebula (on the northeastern rim of the nebula, 7 seconds of time east and 2 arcmin north of the brightest part of the nebula) as measured with Auwer's heliometer, indicating that Auwers must have also observed the object at some time prior to the publication of his 1862 catalog.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0 by 3.0 arcmin? NGC 1333 is a diffuse nebular region forming young stars (many less than a million years old) which are obscured by and illuminate the nebula in a variety of ways. It is classified as a reflection and/or emission nebula, according to the region involved. At the top of the image below, light scattered by dust near a hot blue star is even bluer than the star itself (as in the case of sunlight scattered by our atmosphere). Below, equally bright stars are nearly hidden by clouds of gas and dust lying between them and us, while near the bottom, other regions glow with the reddish light of hydrogen atoms excited by ultraviolet radiation from stars completely hidden from view.
DSS image of reflection and emission nebula NGC 1333
Above, an 18 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1333
Below, a ? arcmin wide NOAO image of the nebula
(Image Credit Jay Lavine & Ali Huang/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of reflection and emission nebula NGC 1333
Below, a ? arcmin wide CFHT image of the nebula
(Image Credit & © Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CFHT), Hawaiian Starlight, © CFHT; used by permission)
CFHT image of emission and reflection nebula NGC 1333

NGC 1334
(= PGC 13001 = UGC 2759 = CGCG 541-017 = MCG +07-08-018)

Discovered (Feb 14, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Oct 27, 1888) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc? pec?) in Perseus (RA 03 30 01.8, Dec +41 49 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1334 (= GC 711, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 20 47, NPD 48 39.1) is "extremely faint, pretty large, a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 30 07.0, Dec +41 50 06, about 1 arcmin east-northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: The reference to Swift's observation is taken from Steinicke's historical database, and refers to Swift's observation of NGC 1334 (his list XIII #37) on the date shown above. Normally, Steinicke does not list any observer except the original one, the usual exception being when the later observation is considerably more accurate, and led to a change in Dreyer's NGC position in the IC1 or IC2 (Swift's position was accurate to 0.4 arcmin, but that wasn't enough of a change for Dreyer to bother to mention Swift's observation). However, Swift observed two objects on the same evening, the other (Swift XIII #36) being later listed as IC 323, which is the small group of faint stars shown on the right side of the wide-field image below, so that may explain Steinicke's deviation from his usual practice of ignoring such "unimportant" observations.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1334, also showing IC 323
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1334, also IC 323
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1334

NGC 1335
(= PGC 13015 = UGC 2762 = CGCG 541-018 = MCG +07-08-019)

Discovered (Oct 13, 1869) by
╔douard Stephan (but not published)
Re-discovered (Dec 14, 1881) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1335)
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec?) in Perseus (RA 03 30 19.5, Dec +41 34 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1335 (Stephan list XII (#27), 1860 RA 03 21 01, NPD 48 54.7) is a "very faint star in very faint, extremely small nebulosity".
Discovery Note: Stephan's date of discovery based on his published data is Dec 14, 1881, which represents the date when he made what he considered an adequate micrometric measurement; but based on Stephan's original notes, Yann Pothier has shown that he actually made his first observation of what became NGC 1335 on Oct 13, 1869, as shown above.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1335
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1335
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1335

NGC 1336
(= PGC 12848 = ESO 358-002 = MCG -06-08-016)

Discovered (Oct 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Fornax (RA 03 26 32.2, Dec -35 42 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1336 (= GC 712 = JH 2537, 1860 RA 03 21 10, NPD 126 12.6) is "very faint, small, very little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.9 by 1.4 arcmin (from the images below). A member (FCC 47) of the Fornax Cluster.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1336
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1336
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1336

NGC 1337
(= PGC 12916 = MCG -02-09-042)

Discovered (Nov 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)cd?) in Eridanus (RA 03 28 05.9, Dec -08 23 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1337 (Swift list III (#26), 1860 RA 03 21 17, NPD 98 53.2) is "extremely faint, very large, much extended north-south".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 5.8 by 1.35 arcmin (from the images below).
NOAO image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1337 overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, an NOAO image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1337
(Image Credit above and below Jeff Cremer/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
Below, a 6 arcmin wide NOAO image of the galaxy
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1337

NGC 1338
(= PGC 12956 = MCG -02-09-044)

Discovered (Dec 18, 1883) by
╔douard Stephan (but not published)
Re-observed (Dec 15, 1884) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1338)
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)b? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 28 54.5, Dec -12 09 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1338 (Stephan list XIII (#24), 1860 RA 03 22 16, NPD 102 38.2) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Discovery Note: Stephan's date of discovery based on his published data is Dec 15, 1884, which represents the date when he made what he considered an adequate micrometric measurement; but based on Stephan's original notes, Yann Pothier has shown that he actually made his first observation of what became NGC 1338 on Dec 18, 1883, as shown above.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.35 by 1.25 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1338
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1338
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1338

NGC 1339
(= PGC 12917 = ESO 418-004 = MCG -05-09-004)

Discovered (Nov 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Fornax (RA 03 28 06.5, Dec -32 17 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1339 (= GC 713 = JH 2538, 1860 RA 03 22 30, NPD 122 46.3) is "considerably bright, pretty small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, double star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.3 by 1.75 arcmin (from the images below). A member (FCC 63) of the Fornax Cluster.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1339
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1339
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1339

NGC 1340 (=
NGC 1344)
(= PGC 12923 = ESO 418-005 = MCG -05-09-005)

Discovered (Oct 9, 1790) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1344)
Also observed (Nov 18, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1344)
Also observed (between July and September, 1897) by Swift (while listed as NGC 1340)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1340)
Looked for but not found (date?) by Lewis Swift (while listed as NGC 1340)
A magnitude 10.4 elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Fornax (RA 03 28 19.6, Dec -31 04 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1340 (= GC 715 = JH 2539, 1860 RA 03 22 39, NPD 121 23.2) is "very bright, pretty small, a little extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle (? I 257)", the (? I 257) indicating that Dreyer thought this might be the same as NGC 1344 (see Discovery Note, below). The second Index Catalog changes that opinion, noting (per Swift) "To be struck out". The position precesses to RA 03 28 20.9, Dec -30 54 00, far enough from the correct position that Swift could find nothing in the area save for NGC 1344, and presuming that NGC 1340 was a different object, said it should be struck out as nonexistent. However (per Corwin), Herschel almost certainly did observe something, namely the same galaxy observed by his father. He simply made a series of careless mistakes, missing the transit required for an accurate position, then estimating the position using an incorrect reference star, so that he ended up with a position 10 arcmin due north of the object. (JH said he used 12 Eridani, but there is no such star, and Corwin concludes that he must have used α Fornacis, as that yields a position nearly identical to that for NGC 1344).
Discovery Note: In a note at the end of the original NGC Dreyer stated that (JH) 2539 "may be identical with I 157 (=JH) 2542, for (JH) has only one observation of each (in different sweeps) and gives but a rough place for (JH) 2542." If correct, that would mean that NGC 1340 was an incorrect measurement of the position of NGC 1344. As noted above, since Swift couldn't find anything at the position for NGC 1340, the IC2 said that 1340 should be "struck out" (deleted) from the catalog. Nowadays, however, standard practice is to keep the "to be struck out" entries in the catalog, to ensure that all the numbers have some entry, and simply treat them as duplicate observations when, as in this case, it seems certain that they are the same as another NGC entry, and either "lost or nonexistent" or some educated guess if a reasonable candidate can be found based on modern studies of the literature.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1344 for anything else.

NGC 1341
(= PGC 12911 = ESO 358-008 = MCG -06-08-020)

Discovered (Nov 29, 1837) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date? Bruce plate 4040) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(s)ab?) in Fornax (RA 03 27 58.4, Dec -37 09 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1341 (= GC 716 = JH 2540, 1860 RA 03 22 40, NPD 127 38.2) is "faint, small, round, 12th magnitude star to southeast". The second Index Catalog adds (per DeLisle Stewart) "not round, but much extended 140░". The position precesses to RA 03 27 58.6, Dec -37 08 58, right on the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below). A member (FCC 62) of the Fornax Cluster.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1341
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1341
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1341
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 1341

NGC 1342
(= OCL 401)

Discovered (Dec 28, 1799) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 10, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.7 open cluster (type III3p) in Perseus (RA 03 31 40.0, Dec +37 22 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1342 (= GC 717 = JH 301 = WH VIII 88, 1860 RA 03 22 41, NPD 53 09.6) is "a cluster, very large, about 60 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 17 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1342
Above, a 24 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1342

NGC 1343
(= PGC 13384 = UGC 2792 = CGCG 327-005 = MCG +12-04-001)

Discovered (Oct 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 29, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)b? pec) in Cassiopeia (RA 03 37 49.7, Dec +72 34 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1343 (= GC 718 = JH 300 = WH III 694, 1860 RA 03 22 54, NPD 17 54.3) is "faint, very small, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle, double star very near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1343
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1343
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1343

"PGC 5061453"
(= HFLLZOA G134.74+13.65)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 1343
A magnitude ? elliptical galaxy (type E?) in (RA 03 37 57.6, Dec +72 35 22)
Physical Information: Essentially nothing known except its location in the sky

NGC 1344 (=
NGC 1340)
(= PGC 12923 = ESO 418-005 = MCG -05-09-005)

Discovered (Oct 9, 1790) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1344)
Also observed (Nov 18, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1344)
Looked for but not found (between July and September, 1897) by Swift (while listed as NGC 1344)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1340)
A magnitude 10.4 elliptical galaxy (type E5?) in Fornax (RA 03 28 19.6, Dec -31 04 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1344 (= GC 714 = JH 2542 = WH I 257, 1860 RA 03 23 00, NPD 121 32.7▒) is "considerably bright, pretty large, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 28 41.3, Dec -31 03 33, about 5 arcmin east of a nearly 5 arcmin wide galaxy of considerable brightness, and there is nothing else nearby, so the identity as the galaxy above is certain. However, as seen in the title for this entry (per Swift), this is the same as NGC 1340 and and should therefore be "struck out" (see NGC 1340) .
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.8 by 3.1 arcmin?
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1344
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 1344
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1344

NGC 1345
(= PGC 12979 = UGCA 74 = ESO 548-026 = MCG -03-09-046)

Discovered (Dec 11, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c? pec?) in Eridanus (RA 03 29 31.7, Dec -17 46 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1345 (= GC 719 = JH 2541, 1860 RA 03 23 10, NPD 108 16.2) is "very faint, small, round, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1345
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1345
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1345
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1345

NGC 1346
(= PGC 13009 = MCG -01-09-042)

Discovered (Dec 12, 1875) by
╔douard Stephan (but not published)
Re-observed (Dec 15, 1876) by ╔douard Stephan (and later listed as NGC 1346)
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type (R)S(rs)b? pec?) in Eridanus (RA 03 30 13.3, Dec -05 32 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1346 (= GC 5313, Stephan list VIII (#12), 1860 RA 03 23 18, NPD 96 01.4) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, brighter middle, 13th magnitude star to west".
Discovery Note: Stephan's date of discovery based on his published data is Dec 15, 1876, which represents the date when he made what he considered an adequate micrometric measurement; but based on Stephan's original notes, Yann Pothier has shown that he actually made his first observation of what became NGC 1346 on Dec 12, 1875, as shown above.
Physical Information: NGC 1346 has a recessional velocity of 4060 km/sec, but is obviously interacting with its companion, PGC 13005, so they are undoubtedly at the same distance. Based on their average recessional velocity of 4120 km/sec, the pair are about 190 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below), NGC 1346 is about ? thousand light years across. NGC 1346 is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1346 and its companion, PGC 13005, overlaid on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 1346
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 1346 and its companion, PGC 13005
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1346 and companion, PGC 13005
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1346

PGC 13005
Not an NGC object but listed here because interacting with
NGC 1346
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABa? pec?) in Eridanus (RA 03 30 09.5, Dec -05 31 18)
Physical Information: PGC 13005 has a recessional velocity of 4180 km/sec, but is obviously interacting with its companion, NGC 1346, so they are undoubtedly at the same distance. Based on their average recessional velocity of 4120 km/sec, the pair are about 190 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.25 by 0.45 arcmin (from the image below), PGC 13005 is about ? thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 13005 and part of its companion, spiral galaxy NGC 1346
Above, a 1.5 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 13005; for wider views see NGC 1346

NGC 1347 (with
PGC 816443 = Arp 39)
(= PGC 12989 = ESO 548-027 = MCG -04-09-017)

(The ESO and MCG designations include both members of Arp 39, but NGC 1347 is only the brighter galaxy)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 29 41.8, Dec -22 16 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1347 (Leavenworth list II (#369), 1860 RA 03 23 41, NPD 112 45.3) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 130░, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Arp 39 was intended as an example of a spiral galaxy with faint companions. In this case, PGC 12989 (NGC 1347) is the spiral galaxy in question, and PGC 816443 is the faint companion. Based on a recessional velocity of 1760 km/sec, NGC 1347 is about 80 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below), it is about ? thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 1347 and PGC 816443, which comprise Arp 39
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1347, also showing PGC 816443
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the pair of galaxies, also known as Arp 39
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1347 and PGC 816443, which comprise Arp 39

PGC 816443 (with
NGC 1347 = Arp 39)
(= ESO 548-027 = MCG -04-09-017)

(The ESO and MCG designations include both members of Arp 39, but NGC 1347 is only the brighter galaxy)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of NGC 1347, and as part of Arp 39
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Eridanus (RA 03 29 41.2, Dec -22 17 27)
Physical Information: No independent radial velocity is known for this object, but if truly a companion of NGC 1347 (which see for images), then it is about 80 million light years away, and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below) arcmin corresponds to about ? thousand light years.

NGC 1348
(= OCL 391)

Discovered (Dec 28, 1790) by
William Herschel
An open cluster (type II2p) in Perseus (RA 03 34 06.0, Dec +51 24 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1348 (= GC 720 = WH VIII 84, 1860 RA 03 23 42, NPD 39 03.3) is "a cluster, a little rich, stars large (bright)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0 arcmin?
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1348
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1348

NGC 1349
(= PGC 13088 = UGC 2774 = CGCG 416-013 = MCG +01-09-006)

Discovered (Dec 20, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.1 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(r)a? pec) in Taurus (RA 03 31 27.5, Dec +04 22 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1349 (Swift list VI (#13), 1860 RA 03 23 58, NPD 86 06.9) is "most extremely faint, small, round, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.5 by 1.45 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1349
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1349
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1349
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1250 - 1299) ←NGC Objects: NGC 1300 - 1349→ (NGC 1350 - 1399)