Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Dec 23, 2020
Completed NGC 1431 and 1445 due to query about their types
Checked updated Corwin positions
Previously added Dreyer original NGC entries, PGC IDs, most Steinicke databases
Updated to current formatting
WORING 1434: Precessing NGC positions, confirming IDs
NEXT: Add/update physical information, add better images

NGC 1400 (= PGC 13470)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 39 30.8, Dec -18 41 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1400 (= GC 747 = JH 2567 = WH II 593, 1860 RA 03 33 13, NPD 109 08.7) is "considerably bright, pretty small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 39 31.3, Dec -18 41 16, almost dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.2 by 3.2 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type SAO-.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1400
Above a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1400
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1400

NGC 1401 (= PGC 13457)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 39 21.8, Dec -22 43 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1401 (= GC 749 = JH 2568 = WH III 247, 1860 RA 03 33 14, NPD 113 10.8) is "very faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 03 39 20.1, De -22 43 21, only 0.4 arcmin west-northwest of the center of the galaxy listed above and barely off its northwestern outline, the description is reasonable for a visual observation and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.2 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1401
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1401
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1401

NGC 1402 (= PGC 13467)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 39 30.6, Dec -18 31 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1402 (Leavenworth list II (#376), 1860 RA 03 33 15, NPD 108 59.0) is "extremely faint, very small, round". The position precesses to RA 03 39 33.8, Dec -18 31 34, about 0.8 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1402
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1402; NGC 1407 is just out of frame to the southeast
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1402

NGC 1403 (= PGC 13445)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 39 10.8, Dec -22 23 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1403 (Leavenworth list II (#375), 1860 RA 03 33 17, NPD 112 51.0) is "very faint, extremely small, nebulous star". The position precesses to RA 03 39 24.1, Dec -22 23 34, about 3 arcmin east of the galaxy listed above, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.65 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1403
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1403
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1403

NGC 1404 (= PGC 13433 = FCC 219)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.0 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Eridanus (RA 03 38 51.9, Dec -35 35 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1404 (= GC 750 = JH 2571, 1860 RA 03 33 30, NPD 126 03.2) is "very bright, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 38 50.9, Dec -35 35 44, well within the western outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.5 by 3.1 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type E1. (The designation FCC 219 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
ESO image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1404
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1404
(Image Credit above and below ESO. Acknowledgement: Aniello Grado and Luca Limatola)
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
ESO image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1404
Below, a 25 by 37 arcmin wide image of NGC 1381, 1382, 1387, 1396, 1399 and 1404
(Image Credit & © Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Observatorio Antilhue image of part of the Fornax Cluster of galaxies, showing NGC 1381, NGC 1382, NGC 1387, NGC 1396, NGC 1399 and NGC 1404

NGC 1405 (= PGC 13512)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 40 18.9, Dec -15 31 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1405 (Leavenworth list I (#110), 1860 RA 03 33 40, NPD 105 59.0) is "extremely faint, pretty large, much extended 150, gradually a little brighter middle, faint star involved". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 33 52. The position precesses to RA 03 40 19.4, Dec -15 31 41, within the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.7 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1405, also showing NGC 1413
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1405, also showing NGC 1413
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1405

NGC 1406 (= PGC 13458)
Discovered (Nov 18, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Fornax (RA 03 39 23.3, Dec -31 19 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1406 (= GC 751 = JH 2572, 1860 RA 03 33 50, NPD 121 46.4) is "faint, considerably large, very much extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to northwest". The position precesses to RA 03 39 27.2, Dec -31 19 01, only 0.9 arcmin east-northeast of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.9 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1406
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1406
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1406
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of most of spiral galaxy NGC 1406

NGC 1407 (= PGC 13505)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A 1magnitude 9.7 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 40 11.8, Dec -18 34 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1407 (= GC 752 = JH 2570 = WH I 107, 1860 RA 03 33 54, NPD 109 02.1) is "very bright, large, round, suddenly very much brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 03 40 12.6, Dec -18 34 47, almost dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 7.0 by 7.0 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type E0.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1407
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1407
Below, a 7.2 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1407

NGC 1408 (= "PGC 5067694")
Recorded (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt)
A lost or nonexistent object in Fornax (RA 03 39 21.3, Dec -35 31 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1408 (= GC 5324, J Schmidt (k), 1860 RA 03 34 00, NPD 125 58.9) is "faint". The position precesses to RA 03 39 21.1, Dec -35 31 31, but there is nothing there (Schmidt's original position was 1830 RA 03 32 51.5, Dec -36 04 51, which is essentially the same as Dreyer's position, but precesses to RA 03 39 21.3, Dec -35 31 29, so that is the position listed above).
Discovery Notes: Although no nebular object has been identified that could be NGC 1408, two of the pairs of stars in the region have been suggested as possibly being what Schmidt observed. The more likely pair is at RA 03 39 17.2, Dec -35 30 05, a little to the northwest of Schmidt's position. The less likely pair is at RA 03 39 39.6, Dec -35 33 13, well to the southeast of Schmidt's position. Whether either of these is what Schmidt observed is completely unknown, and probably unknowable; but since they have been suggested as what he observed, they are shown in the image below.
PGC Designation: Presumably for purposes of completeness, LEDA lists NGC 1408 as PGC 5067694 (using the NGC position and correctly stating that it is an unknown object), but there is nothing there and a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being in quotes.
DSS image of region near Schmidt's position for the apparently nonexistent NGC 1408, marked with a plus sign. Also shown are the two pairs of stars that have been suggested as possibly being what Schmidt observed; but whether either of the pairs is what Schmidt saw is completely unknonwn
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Schmidt's position for NGC 1408 (indicated by a + sign), also showing NGC 1404. The more likely pair of stars (which is listed as NGC 1408 in the NED, with a warning that the identification is uncertain at best) is marked with a single question mark, and the less likely pair with two question marks.

NGC 1409 (= PGC 13553)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type (R)S(rs)ab? pec) in Taurus (RA 03 41 10.4, Dec -01 18 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1409 (= GC 753 = JH 304 = WH III 263, 1860 RA 03 34 04, NPD 91 45.6) is "extremely faint, stellar or a little extended". The position precesses to RA 03 41 10.2, Dec -01 18 23, only 0.2 arcmin south-southwest of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.4 arcmin (including the fainter outer extensions, from the images below). The brighter inner region is only about 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin across. Interacting with NGC 1410. Recessional velocity 7750 km/sec.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1409 and lenticular galaxy NGC 1410
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1409 and NGC 1410
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the interacting pair of galaxies
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1409 and lenticular galaxy NGC 1410
Below, a roughly 0.38 by 0.52 arcmin wide image shows material flowing from NGC 1409 to NGC 1410
(Image Credit NASA/HST, William C. Keel (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa))
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 1409 and lenticular galaxy NGC 1410

NGC 1410 (= PGC 13556)
Discovered (Jan 17, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0? pec) in Taurus (RA 03 41 10.7, Dec -01 17 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1410 (= GC 754, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 03 34 04, NPD 91 45) "makes a double nebula with h 304, position 0", (JH 304) being NGC 1409. The position precesses to RA 03 41 10.2, Dec -01 17 47, less than 0.2 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed abov, the description fits and its obvious interaction with NGC 1409 makes the identification certain.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin (including the fainter outer extensions, from the images above). The brighter inner region is only about 0.2 by 0.2 arcmin across. Interacting with NGC 1409, which see for images. Recessional velocity 7590 km/sec.

NGC 1411 (= PGC 13429 = PGC 138657, and probably =
IC 1943)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1411)
Discovered (Oct 3, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1943)
A magnitude 11.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Horologium (RA 03 38 44.9, Dec -44 06 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1411 (= GC 755 = JH 2573, 1860 RA 03 34 05, NPD 134 33.3) is "bright, pretty small, round, suddenly much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 38 47.2, Dec -44 05 53, on the eastern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification as NGC 1411 is certain. (See IC 1943 for a discussion of the probable duplicate entry.)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.0 by 2.1 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type SA(l)0.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1411
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1411
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1411

NGC 1412 (=
IC 1981 = PGC 13520)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1412)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1981)
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Fornax (RA 03 40 29.4, Dec -26 51 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1412 (= GC 757 = JH 2574, 1860 RA 03 34 37, NPD 116 40.1) is "faint, small, extended, gradually brighter middle, star 2 arcmin to southwest". The position precesses to RA 03 40 31.6, Dec -26 12 52, but there is nothing there nor anywhere near there. However, per Corwin, there is a galaxy that fits the description (including the position of the nearby star), and is the only one in the region that Herschel could possibly have seen, about 39 arcmin nearly due south; so it is essentially certain that the galaxy listed above is Herschel's object, and therefore NGC 1412.
Discovery Note: Per Corwin, the copy of the sweep at the Herschel Archives "suggests from internal evidence" that the calculations converting the observation to a position were done correctly, so "the incorrect declination probably results from a mistaken reading at the telescope."
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1412
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1412
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1412

NGC 1413 (= PGC 13504)
Discovered (Dec 26, 1885) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (Jul 1898 to Jun 1899) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1413)
A magnitude 14.3 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Eridanus (RA 03 40 11.6, Dec -15 36 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1413 (Leavenworth list I (#111), 1860 RA 03 34 40, NPD 106 02.9) is "extremely faint, very small, round, a little brighter middle". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 33 45. Howe's actual position [(1900) RA 03 35 35, Dec -15 56.0] precesses to RA 03 40 11.7, Dec -15 36 35, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1413, also showing NGC 1405
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1413, also showing NGC 1405
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1413

NGC 1414 (= PGC 13543)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Not observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1414)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 03 40 57.1, Dec -21 42 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1414 (Leavenworth list II (#377), 1860 RA 03 34 47, NPD 112 10.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, much extended 0, brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 03 40 55.9, Dec -21 43 43, just under an arcmin south-southwest of the galaxy listed above, the description is a perfect fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Incorrect "Correction" Note: The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 03 35 23, NPD 112 07.9. Howe's published position [(1900) RA 03 37 08, Dec -22 0.0] precesses to (1860) RA 03 35 22.7, Dec -22 07 51 = (2000) RA 03 41 31.6, Dec -21 40 45, which is essentially the same as the IC2 position, but nearly dead center on NGC 1422(!?!), so Howe must have misidentified the object, and as a result his "corrected" position for NGC 1414 has nothing to do with its entry, and there is nothing to suggest that he ever observed NGC 1414.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.6 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1414
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1414
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1414

NGC 1415 (=
IC 1983 = PGC 13544)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1784) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1415)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1415)
Discovered (Oct 8, 1896) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 1983)
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 40 56.9, Dec -22 33 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1415 (= GC 759 = JH 2575 = WH II 267, 1860 RA 03 34 51, NPD 113 00.7) is "pretty bright, small, a little extended, pretty gradually a little brighter middle, star to southeast" (Dreyer's entry has an arcmin sign for the distance of the star, but omits the number). The position precesses to RA 03 40 57.3, Dec -22 33 31, on the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 5.4 by 1.8 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type (R)SAB(rs)a.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1415
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1415
Below, a 4.4 by 5.2 arcmin image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1415

NGC 1416 (= PGC 13548)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also observed (Jul 1898 to Jun 1899) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 1416)
A magnitude 12.9 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Eridanus (RA 03 41 02.9, Dec -22 43 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1416 (Muller list II (#378), 1860 RA 03 34 54, NPD 113 13.9) is "extremely faint, small, round, 8.6 magnitude star 2 arcmin to north". The second IC lists a corrected NPD (per Howe) of 113 10.3. Howe's position (actually (1900) RA 03 36 41, Dec -23 02.4) precesses to (2000) RA 03 41 02.4, Dec -22 43 06, well within the western outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits (save for the position of the nearby star, which is south of the nebula) and there is nothing else nearby that fits the description, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Note: Howe wrote "Muller gave this nebula as 2 arcmin north of a star of mag. 8.6. It is really south of the star". This is backwards from what Muller wrote and from what Howe must have observed, as Howe's position (as noted above) is correct, even though his description is confused. Corwin's lengthy discussion of this object shows that everyone who observed it made similar mistakes but concludes that Howe's correct statement about the relative positions of the two bright stars to the south of the nebula ("There is another star of equal mag. about 5 arcmin south of the star mentioned.") makes it clear that his observation and position certainly were of the galaxy listed above.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1416
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1416
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1416

NGC 1417 (= PGC 13584)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Eridanus (RA 03 41 57.4, Dec -04 42 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1417 (= GC 758 = JH 306 = WH II 455, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 35 01, NPD 95 09.3) is "pretty faint, pretty large, a little extended, a little brighter middle, star to southeast". The position precesses to RA 03 41 58.1, Dec -04 42 13, well within the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the only other object nearby corresponds to NGC 1418, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.2 by 1.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1417, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 1418
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1417, also showing NGC 1418
Below, a 2.8 by 3.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1417

NGC 1418 (= PGC 13606 = PGC 176570 = PGC 176571)
Discovered (Oct 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 42 16.2, Dec -04 43 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1418 (= GC 760 = JH 307 = WH II 456, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 35 19, NPD 95 11.2) is "very faint, small, extended, 11th magnitude star 1 arcmin to southeast". The position precesses to RA 03 42 16.0, De -04 44 10, on the southern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits (except that the star is to the south-southwest) and the only other object in the region corresponds to NGC 1417, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.0 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1418, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 1417
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1418, also showing NGC 1417
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1418

NGC 1419 (= PGC 13534 = PGC 622012 = FCC 249)
Discovered (Oct 22, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 40 42.1, Dec -37 30 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1419 (= GC 761 = JH 2576, 1860 RA 03 35 30, NPD 127 58.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 40 42.3, Dec -37 31 27, only 0.8 arcmin south of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 249 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1419
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1419
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1419

NGC 1420 (= "PGC 5067583")
Recorded (Oct 28, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Three stars in Eridanus (RA 03 42 39.9, Dec -05 51 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1420 (= GC 5325, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 35 46, NPD 96 18.4) is "faint, very small, 13th magnitude star to west". The position precesses to RA 03 42 40.0, Dec -05 51 26, but there are no nebular objects there nor anywhere near there. However, the triplet of faint stars listed above lies only 0.3 arcmin north of the position, and there is a 13th magnitude star exactly where d'Arrest said it was, so he must have mistaken the triplet for a faint nebula (a not uncommon error by the original NGC observers), and the identification of the triplet as NGC 1420 is certain.
PGC Designation: Presumably for purposes of completeness, LEDA lists NGC 1420 as PGC 5067583 (stating that it is a triple star), but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being in quotes.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near the stars listed as NGC 1420
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the stars listed as NGC 1420

NGC 1421 (= PGC 13620 = PGC 937172 = PGC 937482)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)bc?) in Eridanus (RA 03 42 29.3, Dec -13 29 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1421 (= GC 762 = JH 2577 = WH II 291, 1860 RA 03 35 57, NPD 103 56.9) is "faint, considerably large, much extended 0, mottled but not resolved". The position precesses to RA 03 42 29.9, Dec -13 29 56, well within the southern half of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 4.2 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type SB(s)c.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1421
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1421
Below, a 3.6 by 4.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1421

NGC 1422 (= PGC 13569 = PGC 825129)
Discovered (Nov 19, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
Also observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe (misidentified as NGC 1414)
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBab? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 41 31.3, Dec -21 40 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1422 (Leavenworth list II (#379), 1860 RA 03 36 17, NPD 112 08.9) is "extremely faint, pretty small, extended 80". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per DeLisle Stewart) of 03 35 21 and adds "extended 65 degrees". The corrected position precesses to RA 03 41 29.9, Dec -21 41 48, about 1 arcmin south-southwest of the galaxy listed above, the descriptions fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Incorrect "Correction" Note: The second IC lists a corrected position (per Howe) of RA 03 35 23, NPD 112 07.9 for NGC 1414. Howe's published position [(1900) RA 03 37 08, Dec -22 0.0] precesses to (1860) RA 03 35 22.7, Dec -22 07 51, which is essentially the same as the IC2 position, but precesses to (2000) RA 03 41 31.6, Dec -21 40 45 and is nearly dead center on NGC 1422, so Howe must have misidentified the object, and as a result his "corrected" position for "NGC 1414" actually belongs to 1422. (Corwin notes that considering how poor the original positions for 1414 and 1422 were, Howe's being able to identify either of them, even incorrectly, speaks to his skill as an observer.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1422
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1422
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1422

NGC 1423 (= PGC 13628 = PGC 13629)
Discovered (Oct 31, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)bc? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 42 40.1, Dec -06 22 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1423 (Swift list V (#55), 1860 RA 03 36 18, NPD 96 49.4) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very difficult". The position precesses to RA 03 43 10.6, Dec -06 22 32, about 30 seconds of time to the east of the only nebula in the region that Swift could have seen (about 7.5 arcmin). Though a substantial error in the position it is not terribly unusual for Swift, and since there is nothing else that could be what he observed, the identification of NGC 1423 as the galaxy listed above is considered certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.8 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1423
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 1423
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1423

NGC 1424 (= PGC 13664)
Discovered (Dec 8, 1850) by
Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b? pec) in Eridanus (RA 03 43 14.0, Dec -04 43 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1424 (= GC 763, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 03 36 19, NPD 95 11) is "very faint, 10th or 11th magnitude star to northwest". The position precesses to RA 03 43 16.0, Dec -04 44 08, about 0.6 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
"Possible" Duplicate Entry: Corwin mentions a suggestion that the "lost" NGC 1429 (which see) might be a poor observation of NGC 1424, but as discussed in the entry for 1429, gives that suggestion a very low probability of being correct; so it is mentioned here more as a warning than anything else.
Discovery Note: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.4 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below). Considerably distorted, and probably associated with several clouds of stars to its east and northeast. There is no sign of anything that could have interacted with it in the images below, but perhaps the object has already merged with NGC 1424, and can only be detected (if at all) by detailed imaging and study.
Possible "Companion": Corwin lists a possible "companion" (the easternmost of the star clouds mentioned above) at RA 03 43 18.2, Dec -04 43 24. However, that "object" does not have a designation of any sort, and is probably merely part of NGC 1424 that has been torn from it at some time in the past, rather than an originally separate object.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1424
Above, a 12 arcmin DSS image centered on NGC 1424
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and possibly related star clouds to its east
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1424
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1424

NGC 1425 (= PGC 13602, and perhaps =
IC 1988?)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1790) by William Herschel
A magnitude 10.6 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)b?) in Fornax (RA 03 42 11.5, Dec -29 53 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1425 (= GC 764 = JH II 852, 1860 RA 03 36 30, NPD 120 21.2) is "faint, pretty large, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 42 11.5, Dec -29 54 16, well within the southern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 7.0 by 2.7 arcmin (from the images below). (There are a large number of images of this object in the Hubble Legacy Archive, but because the galaxy apears much larger than the HST field of view stitching them together to produce a satisfactory composite will require time and effort, and it will be a while before the results are posted here.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1425
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1425
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1425
Below, another image of the same region (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1425

NGC 1426 (= PGC 13638 = PGC 819016)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 elliptical galaxy (type E3/4?) in Eridanus (RA 03 42 49.1, Dec -22 06 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1426 (= GC 765 = JH 2578 = WH III 248, 1860 RA 03 36 42, NPD 112 33.4) is "pretty faint, small, a little extended, brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 42 49.4, Dec -22 06 32, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.9 by 1.9 arcmin (from the images below). Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type E4.
HST image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1426 superimposed on a DSS image of region near the galaxy
Above, the image below superimposed on a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1426
(Image Credit & © above and below Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Below, a 3.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1426
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide HST image of central part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
HST image of the central portion of elliptical galaxy NGC 1426

NGC 1427 (= PGC 13609 = FCC 276)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Fornax (RA 03 42 19.4, Dec -35 23 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1427 (= GC 766 = JH 2579, 1860 RA 03 36 58, NPD 125 51.0) is "pretty faint, small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 03 42 18.6, Dec -35 24 06, only half an arcmin south of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1390 km/sec, NGC 1427 is about 65 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 45 to 80 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 4.2 by 3.0 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 80 thousand light years across. Listed in Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog as FCC 276. In the HST image below, many of the apparently star-like objects near NGC 1427 are actually globular clusters associated with the galaxy.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1427
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1427
Below, a 5.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1427
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide HST image of the central portion of the galaxy
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, NomolosX; post-processing by Courtney Seligman)
HST image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1427; many of the apparently star-like objects near the galaxy are actually globular clusters

PGC 13500 (= "NGC 1427A" = FCC 235)
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 1427A
A magnitude 12.8 irregular galaxy (type IB(s)m?) in
Eridanus (RA 03 40 09.6, Dec -35 37 33)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.5 arcmin.? (The designation FCC 235 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
HST image of irregular galaxy PGC 13500, also known as NGC 1427A, superimposed on an ESO image of the region closest to the galaxy, superimposed on a DSS background to fill in missing areas
Above, a HST image overlaid on a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS composite image centered on PGC 13500
(Image Credit above and below NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA);
Acknowledgment: M. Gregg (UC-Davis & Inst. for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab.))

Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy
HST image of irregular galaxy PGC 13500, also known as NGC 1427A
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (North is on the left to allow more detail; image credit as above)
HST closeup of irregular galaxy PGC 13500, also known as NGC 1427A, with North at the left to allow for more detail

NGC 1428 (PGC 13611 = FCC 277)
Discovered (Jan 19, 1865) by
Julius Schmidt
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0?) in Fornax (RA 03 42 22.8, Dec -35 09 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1428 (= GC 5326, J Schmidt (l), 1860 RA 03 37 00, NPD 125 36.4) is "faint". The position precesses to RA 03 42 21.5, Dec -35 09 31, less than 0.4 arcmin southwest of the galaxy listed above and barely outside its southwestern rim, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 277 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1428
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1428
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1428

1429's identity (or lack thereof) to be enlarged upon later

NGC 1429 (= "PGC 5067584")
Recorded (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A lost or nonexistent object in Eridanus (RA 03 44 03.8, Dec -04 43 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1429 (Leavenworth list II (#381), 1860 RA 03 37 05, NPD 95 10) is "extremely faint, very small, extended 0, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 1424. The position precesses to RA 03 44 02.0, Dec -04 43 16, but there is nothing there. Various conjectures about what, if anything, NGC 1429 might be will be posted here in the near future.
Discovery Notes: Leavenworth lists two objects for his #381, one at 1890 RA 03 38.1, Dec -05 04, which he lists as GC 763 (= NGC 1424), and the other at RA 03 38.6, Dec -05 04, which is what Dreyer listed as NGC 1429. Leavenworth's position precesses to RA 03 44 03.8, Dec -04 43 06, which though essentially the same as Dreyer's position is the one listed above. Corwin has a long discussion of various possibilities for NGC 1429, including the magnitude 15.8 star to the northwest of Leavenworth's position (at RA 03 44 00.4, Dec -04 42 52), so it is shown in the image below. He also lists NGC 1418 as one of several possible but unlikely candidates; as noted above, more to be added about such suggestions later.)
PGC Designation: Presumably for purposes of completeness, LEDA lists NGC 1429 as PGC 5067584 (and as an unknown object near Leavenworth's position), but a search for that designation returns no result, hence its being in quotes.
DSS image of region near the apparently nonexistent NGC 1429, also showing the star that may or may not be what Leavenworth observed
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on Leavenworth's position for NGC 1429
The star in the box is the one that is considered a possible but unlikely candidate for the entry

1430's identity (or lack thereof) to be enlarged upon later

NGC 1430 (= "PGC 5067754")
Recorded (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Probably not a magnitude 12.8 star in Eridanus (RA 03 43 25.0, Dec -18 13 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1430 (Leavenworth list II (#380), 1860 RA 03 37 09, NPD 108 40.8) is "extremely faint, small, extended 20, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 03 43 28.1, Dec -18 14 01, but there is nothing there nor near there. The star listed above is one of numerous suggestions for what Leavenworth might have observed, and it lies only ? arcmin northwest of his position; but the description seems completely incompatible with a stellar object, hence my dubious statement in the description line. (More to follow about the various comments by Corwin noted in the next paragraph.)

Corwin suggests that NGC 1430 might be another duplicate observation of NGC 1440 (the other one being NGC 1442, and also lists the 13th magnitude star at RA 03 43 25.0, Dec -18 13 33 as a possible (but very unlikely?) candidate, hence its current place in the description of this entry.
PGC Designation: Presumably for purposes of completeness, LEDA lists NGC 1430 as PGC 5067754 (and as a star), but a search for that designation returns no result, so it is in quotes.
DSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 1430
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 1430

NGC 1431 (= PGC 13732)
Discovered (Sep 6, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SA(sr)b) in Taurus (RA 03 44 40.8, Dec +02 50 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1431 (= GC 5327, Marth #91, 1860 RA 03 37 23, NPD 87 37) is "extremely faint, pretty large, irregularly round". The position precesses to RA 03 44 40.3, Dec +02 49 39, which falls on the southwestern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 9080 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 1431 is about 420 to 425 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 405 to 410 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 415 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.05 by 0.8 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 120 to 125 thousand light years across. Per a note from Corwin, this galaxy appears to be similar to M81.
DSS image of the region near spiral galaxy NGC 1431
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1431
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of the spiral galaxy NGC 1431
Below, a 1.25 by 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
DSS image of the spiral galaxy NGC 1431

Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 213243) at RA 03 44 36.2, Dec +02 52 59

NGC 1432 (= "PGC 3518612"), the Maia Nebula
Discovered (Nov 16, 1885) by
Paul Henry and Prosper Henry
A reflection nebula in Taurus (RA 03 45 49.6, Dec +24 22 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1432 (Henry, 1860 RA 03 37 30, NPD 66 05) is "extremely faint, very large, diffuse (Maja Plejadum)", "Maja Plejadum" meaning "the (4th-magnitude) star Maia, in the Pleiades". The position precesses to RA 03 45 46.3, Dec +24 21 33, essentially dead center on the nebula surrounding Maia, the description fits and though there are numerous nebulae illuminated by various stars in the Pleiades, the identification as the one listed above is absolutely certain.
PGC Designation: Though not a galaxy, LEDA lists NGC 1432 as PGC 3518612 (and as the Maia Nebula), but a search for that designation returns no result, hence its being placed in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 26 by 26 arcmin?
DSS image of the region near reflection nebula NGC 1432, also called the Maia Nebula, and reflection nebula NGC 1435, also called the Merope nebula, showing the cluster Maia and Merope belong to, the Pleiades
Above, a 2 degree wide DSS image of the Pleiades, showing the location of NGC 1432 and NGC 1435
Below, a 30 arcmin wide DSS image of Maia and its reflection nebula, NGC 1432
DSS image of reflection nebula NGC 1432, also called the Maia Nebula

NGC 1433 (= PGC 13586)
Discovered (Sep 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.9 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(r)ab) in Horologium (RA 03 42 01.5, Dec -47 13 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1433 (= GC 767 = JH 2580, Dunlop 426, 1860 RA 03 37 38, NPD 137 40.6) is "very bright, large, pretty much extended, very suddenly very much brighter middle equivalent to 10th magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 03 42 01.4, Dec -47 13 44, about 0.4 arcmin south of the center of the galaxy listed above and well within its inner regions, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 7.5 by 6.1 arcmin (from the images below).
Usage By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 1433 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type (R1')SB(r)ab.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1433
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1433
Below, a 7.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1433
Below, a roughly 1.1 by 1.28 arcmin wide image of the central bar (North to the upper left to allow for greater detail)
(Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgements: D. Calzetti (UMass) and the LEGUS Team)
Partially processed HST image of the central bar of spiral galaxy NGC 1433

NGC 1434 (perhaps = PGC 13804)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 46 12.9, Dec -09 40 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1434 (Muller list II (#382), 1860 RA 03 37 40, NPD 100 07.8) is "extremely faint, small, round, 8.5 magnitude star 25 seconds of time to east and 3 arcmin to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.7 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1434
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1434
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1434

Corwin lists a possible companion () at RA 03 46 18.8, Dec -09 38 52

NGC 1435 (= "PGC 3517584"), the Merope Nebula
Discovered (Oct 19, 1859) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (1874) by Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Arthur von Auwers?
A reflection nebula in Taurus (RA 03 46 14.0, Dec +23 46 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1435 (= GC 768, Tempel (A.N. 1290), 1860 RA 03 37 52, NPD 66 40) is "very faint, very large, diffuse (Merope)". LEDA lists NGC 1435 as PGC 3517584 (and as an unknown object), but a search for that designation returns no result.
Discovery Notes: Steinicke lists this as Auwers 18.
Physical Information: Apparent size 30 by 30 arcmin? (Merope is a 4th-magnitude star in the Pleiades.) Note: This should not be confused with Barnard's Merope Nebula, which is an extremely tiny blob of glowing gas extremely close to the star, and is not visible in large-scale images such as those shown here. For a discussion of that, see IC 139.
DSS image of the region near reflection nebula NGC 1432, also called the Maia Nebula, and reflection nebula NGC 1435, also called the Merope nebula, showing the cluster Maia and Merope belong to, the Pleiades
Above, a 2 degree wide DSS image of the Pleiades, showing the location of NGC 1435 and NGC 1432
Below, a 30 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 1435, with Merope at top left
DSS image of reflection nebula NGC 1435, also called the Merope Nebula

NGC 1436 (= PGC 13687 = PGC 643805 =
NGC 1437 = FCC 290)
Also observed (date?) by James Dunlop? (and later listed as NGC 1436)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1436)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1437)
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)ab?) in Eridanus (RA 03 43 37.1, Dec -35 51 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1436 (= GC 769 = JH 2581, Dunlop 562, 1860 RA 03 38 08, NPD 126 34.2) is "a globular cluster, very bright, pretty much extended, pretty gradually brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Dreyer (and presumably Herschel) apparently thought that this was Dunlop 562, but Steinicke does not give Dunlop credit, so the historical identification as Dunlop 562 may be incorrect (to be further addressed in a later iteration of this entry).
Note About Designation: Until recently this galaxy was always called NGC 1437, and as a result in earlier versions of this catalog that is how I treated it; but I've noticed that in recent references it is being called NGC 1436 more and more frequently (for instance, in the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image shown below). As a result I have moved the information for the galaxy from the entry for NGC 1437 to this entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.6 by 2.4 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 290 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1436, also listed as NGC 1437
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1436, also known as NGC 1437
Below, a 3.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1436, also listed as NGC 1437

NGC 1437 (= PGC 13687 = PGC 643805 =
NGC 1436 = FCC 290)
Discovered (Jan 9, 1836) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1436)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1837) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1437)
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)ab?) in Eridanus (RA 03 43 37.1, Dec -35 51 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1437 (= GC 770 = JH 2582, 1860 RA 03 38 20, NPD 126 18.0) is "faint, very large, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Although identified as a duplicate of NGC 1436, the GC/NGC description of the two observations is so different that it is hard to believe that is correct (to be further addressed in the next iteration of this entry).
Physical Information: (The designation FCC 290 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.) Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 1436 for anything else.

PGC 13655 (= "NGC 1437A" = FCC 285)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 1437A
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)dm?) in
Eridanus (RA 03 43 02.2, Dec -36 16 22)
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.7 by 1.5 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 285 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.) Note to self: The Hubble Legacy Archive has some low quality images near the periphery of the galaxy that agree with the DSS starfield, and suggest that the galaxy has a structure similar to PGC 13500, which has a very similar appearance in its DSS images; but too little of the galaxy itself is shown to justify wasting any effort on those images.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 13655, also known as NGC 1437A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 13655
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 13655, also known as NGC 1437A

PGC 13794 (= "NGC 1437B" = FCC 308)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 1437B
A magnitude 13.1 galaxy (type Sc?; Sdm?; I0?) in
Eridanus (RA 03 45 54.7, Dec -36 21 30)
Physical Information: Listed galaxy types are all over the map; all that can be said is that the galaxy has a very loose structure somewhere between a very late type spiral viewed nearly edge on (making it difficult to classify) and an early type irregular. Apparent size of about 2.4 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below). (The designation FCC 308 refers to Ferguson's Fornax Cluster Catalog.)
DSS image of region near galaxy PGC 13794, also known as NGC 1437B
Above, a 12 arcmn wide DSS image centered on PGC 13794
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of galaxy PGC 13794, also known as NGC 1437B
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
Raw HST image of part of galaxy PGC 13794, also known as NGC 1437B

Corwin lists a possible companion () at RA 03 45 45.4, Dec -36 20 46

NGC 1438 (= PGC 13760)
Discovered (Dec 11, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(r)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 17.2, Dec -23 00 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1438 (Ormond Stone list I (#112), 1860 RA 03 38 40, NPD 113 26.8) is "extremely faint, much extended, nuclear, 10th magnitude star 1 arcmin to east". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per DeLisle Stewart) of 03 39 10.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.1 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1438
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1438
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1438

NGC 1439 (= PGC 13738 = PGC 821852)
Discovered (Dec 9, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 44 49.9, Dec -21 55 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1439 (= GC 771 = JH 2584 = WH III 249, 1860 RA 03 38 43, NPD 112 21.7) is "faint, pretty small, gradually pretty much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.4 by 3.3 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 1439
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1439
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 1439

NGC 1440 ( = PGC 13752 = PGC 870364 =
NGC 1442, and probably = NGC 1458)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1440)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1440)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1442)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1458)
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(rs)a?) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 02.9, Dec -18 15 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1440 (= GC 773 = JH 2583 = WH II 458, 1860 RA 03 38 44, NPD 108 43.5) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, suddenly much brighter middle equivalent to 13th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.5 by 1.8 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1440
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1440
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1440

NGC 1441 (= PGC 13782)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b?) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 43.1, Dec -04 05 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1441 (= GC 772 = WH II 597, 1860 RA 03 38 45, NPD 94 31.9) is "very faint, small, irregularly extended, 12th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.7 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1441, also showing NGC 1449 and part of NGC 1451, and the stars listed as NGC 1443 and NGC 1446
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1441, also showing NGC 1449 and part of NGC 1451
Also shown (to the left of their labels) are the stars listed as NGC 1443 and 1446
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1441

NGC 1442 ( = PGC 13752 = PGC 870364 =
NGC 1440, and probably = NGC 1458)
Discovered (Oct 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1440)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1440)
Discovered (Sep 20, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1442)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 1458)
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 02.9, Dec -18 15 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1442 (= GC 774 = WH II 594, 1860 RA 03 38 46, NPD 109 41.9) is "pretty bright, very small, brighter middle (= II 458?)", (WH) II 458 being NGC 1440, which does appear to be a duplicate observation of NGC 1442.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entries, see NGC 1440 for anything else.

NGC 1443 (= "PGC 5067585")
Recorded (1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 14.9 star in Eridanus (RA 03 45 53.1, Dec -04 03 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1443 (Tempel list V, 1860 RA 03 38 50, NPD 94 28) is "very faint, northeast of II 597", (WH) II 597 being NGC 1441. LEDA lists NGC 1443 as PGC 5067585 (and as a star), but a search for that designation returns no result.
Imaging: For an image of the star, see NGC 1441.

NGC 1444 (= OCL 394 = "PGC 3517886")
Discovered (Dec 18, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.6 open cluster (type IV1p) in Perseus (RA 03 49 27.6, Dec +52 39 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1444 (= GC 775 = JH 308 = WH VIII 80, 1860 RA 03 38 52, NPD 37 46.3) is "a cluster of about 30 stars from 12th to 14th magnitude". LEDA lists NGC 1444 as PGC 3517886 (and as an unknown object), but a search for that designation returns no result.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 arcmin? (The position of the cluster is usually given as the position of the bright star near its center, HD 23675.)
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 1444
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 1444

NGC 1445 (= PGC 13742)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
Also observed (Jul 1898 to Jun 1899) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc) in Eridanus (RA 03 44 56.2, Dec -09 51 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1445 (Muller list II (#383), 1860 RA 03 38 58, NPD 100 17.8) is "very faint, small, round, 9th magnitude star 2 arcmin to northwest". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 03 38 14. The position precesses to RA 03 44 56.9, Dec -09 51 14, only 0.2 arcmin northeast of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description is a perfect fit and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical InformationBased on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 9720 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 1445 is about 450 to 455 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 435 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, just under 445 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.4 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 55 to 60 thousand light years across. Earlier classifications of its type tended to be elliptical or lenticular, but the PanSTARRS image shows that it is definitely a spiral, and very similar to NGC 278. The classification shown above was provided by Dr. Corwin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1445
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1445
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy and a 'nearby' star
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1445 and a superimposed star
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 1445
NGC 1446 (not =
NGC 1451?)
Recorded (Jan 8, 1877) by John Dreyer
Also recorded (1882) by Wilhelm Tempel
Probably = A magnitude 13.5 star in Eridanus (RA 03 45 57.5, Dec -04 06 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1446 (Dreyer using Lord Rosse's 72-inch Leviathan, Tempel list V, 1860 RA 03 39 00, NPD 94 30.5) is "extremely faint, east of II 597", (WH) II 597 being NGC 1441. Note to self: LEDA lists NGC 1446 as a duplicate observation of galaxy NGC 1451 (= PGC 13801); so need to address that when do Historical Identification.
Imaging: For an image of the star, see NGC 1441 or NGC 1449.

NGC 1447 (= PGC 13786)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 45 47.2, Dec -09 01 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1447 (Leavenworth list II (#384), 1860 RA 03 39 03, NPD 99 28.8) is "very faint, small, round, nebulous?, 7th or 8th magnitude star 3 arcmin to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1447
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1447
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1447

NGC 1448 (=
NGC 1457 = PGC 13727)
Discovered (Oct 24, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1457)
Discovered (Dec 14, 1835) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 1448)
Also observed (date?) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 10.7 spiral galaxy (type SAcd? pec) in Horologium (RA 03 44 31.9, Dec -44 38 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1448 (= GC 776 = JH 2585, 1860 RA 03 39 05, NPD 135 05.3) is "pretty bright, large, very much extended 222". The second IC adds (per DeLisle Stewart) "1448 = 1457; observed by h on different nights"; so the identity of the two entries has been known for more than a century.
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.7 by 1.6 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 1448
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1448
Below, a 6.5 by 7.2 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission )
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 1448
Below, a 6.2 arcmin wide image of most of the galaxy (Image Credit ESO)
ESO image of spiral galaxy NGC 1448

NGC 1449 (= PGC 13798)
Discovered (Oct 9, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Eridanus (RA 03 46 03.1, Dec -04 08 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 1449 (= GC 5328, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 03 39 05, NPD 94 34.7) is "very faint, very small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 1449, also showing NGC 1441 and NGC 1451, and the stars listed as NGC 1443 and NGC 1446
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 1449, also showing NGC 1441 and 1451
Also shown (to the left of their labels) are the stars listed as NGC 1443 and 1446
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 1449
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 1350 - 1399) ←NGC Objects: NGC 1400 - 1449→ (NGC 1450 - 1499)