Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2600 - 2649) ←NGC Objects: NGC 2650 - 2699 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (NGC 2700 - 2749)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
2650, 2651, 2652, 2653, 2654, 2655, 2656, 2657, 2658, 2659, 2660, 2661, 2662, 2663, 2664, 2665, 2666,
2667, 2668, 2669, 2670, 2671, 2672, 2673, 2674, 2675, 2676, 2677, 2678, 2679, 2680, 2681, 2682, 2683,
2684, 2685, 2686, 2687, 2688, 2689, 2690, 2691, 2692, 2693, 2694, 2695, 2696, 2697, 2698, 2699

Page last updated Dec 16, 2018
Added Dreyer entries, checked Steinicke/Corwin databases
WORKING 2698+: Adding images, updating formatting to current standard
NEXT: Check other historical databases, add images/etc, clean up poor images

NGC 2650 (= PGC 24817)
Discovered (Sep 30, 1802) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b) in Ursa Major (RA 08 49 58.4, Dec +70 17 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2650 (= GC 1690 = WH II 908, 1860 RA 08 36 10, NPD 19 11.4) is "pretty bright, pretty large, irregular figure, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3825 km/sec, NGC 2650 is about 180 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.6 by 1.2 arcmins, it is about 85 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2650
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2650
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2650
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2650

NGC 2651 (= PGC 24521)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Cancer (RA 08 43 55.2, Dec +11 46 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2651 (= GC 5434, Marth #133, 1860 RA 08 36 11, NPD 77 45) is "extremely faint, small, extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2651
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2651
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2651

NGC 2652 (=
NGC 2974 = PC 27762)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2974)
Discovered (1886) by Ormond Stone (and later listed as NGC 2652)
Looked for but not found (date?) by Rudolf Spitaler (while listed as NGC 2652)
A magnitude 10.9 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(r)a?) in Sextans (RA 09 42 33.3, Dec -03 41 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2652 (Ormond Stone list II (#406), 1860 RA 08 36 12, NPD 93 06.7) is "faint, pretty small, extended 50°, gradually brighter middle and stellar nucleus, 9th magnitude star 50 arcsec to southwest". The first IC notes "Not found by Spitaler".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4 by 2.1 arcmin. Depending upon the reason for the double listing this entry may contain only historical information, in which case you should refer to NGC 2974 for physical data and images.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2652
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2652
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2652
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
(The southwestern star was so badly overexposed that I removed its central regions)
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2652

NGC 2653
Recorded (Aug 18, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A pair of stars in Camelopardalis (RA 08 54 55.5, Dec +78 23 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2653 (Tempel list VI (#7), 1860 RA 08 36 41, NPD 11 04) is "very faint, very small, faint star close to north, I 288 to south", (WH) I 288 being NGC 2655.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near the pair of stars listed as NGC 2653
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2653

NGC 2654 (= PGC 24784)
Discovered (Aug 18, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)a? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 08 49 11.8, Dec +60 13 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2654 (Tempel list VI (#6), 1860 RA 08 36 55, NPD 29 13) is "pretty faint, small, faint star in middle, faint star close to southwest".
Physical Information: Classified as peculiar because of the X-shaped regions near the nucleus (which are too faint to show up in the HST image, but are visible in the SDSS images). Apparent size 4.2 by 0.8 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2654
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2654
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2654
Below, a roughly 1 by 1.3 arcmin wide HST image of the northeastern part of the galaxy
(Hubble Legacy Archive, processing and clockwise rotation by Fabian RRRR, post-processing by Courtney Seligman)
HST image of northeastern portion of spiral galaxy NGC 2654

NGC 2655 (= PGC 25069) =
Arp 255
Discovered (Sep 26, 1802) by William Herschel
Also observed (Aug 21, 1828) by John Herschel
Also observed (Apr 8, 1859) by Horace Tuttle
A magnitude 10.1 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a? pec) in Camelopardalis (RA 08 55 38.0, Dec +78 13 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2655 (= GC 1691 = JH 520 = WH I 288, 1860 RA 08 37 02, NPD 11 15.6) is "very bright, considerably large, a little extended 90°, gradually then suddenly very much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with the appearance of fission. It is also a Seyfert galaxy. Apparent size 4.9 by 4.1 arcmin? (inner region only; outer extensions span nearly 12 arcmin)
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2655, also known as Arp 255
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2655
Below, another 12 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Glen Youmans)Astrophotos.net image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2655, also known as Arp 255
A 1.8 arcmin wide HST image of the core of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Fillipenko)
HST image of central portion of lenticular galaxy NGC 2655, also known as Arp 255

NGC 2656 (= PGC 24707)
Discovered (Feb 10, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Ursa Major (RA 08 47 53.1, Dec +53 52 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2656 (= GC 1692 = JH 523, 1860 RA 08 37 28, NPD 35 36.8) is "extremely faint, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2656
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2656
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
Also shown: PGC 3134301 and "PGC 3442691" (= 2MASXJ08475023+5352486), which may be companions of NGC 2656
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2656

NGC 2657 (= PGC 24595)
Discovered (Mar 7, 1885) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in Cancer (RA 08 45 15.8, Dec +09 38 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2657 (Stephan list XIII (#43), 1860 RA 08 37 41, NPD 79 51.1) is "very faint, very small, irregularly round, faint star attached on east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2657
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2657
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2657

NGC 2658 (= OCL 723)
Discovered (May 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Feb 16, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.2 open cluster (type II2m) in Pyxis (RA 08 43 31.0, Dec -32 39 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2658 (= GC 1693 = JH 4017, h o n, Dunlop #609, 1860 RA 08 37 46, NPD 122 09.1) is "a cluster, pretty small, a little rich, a little compressed, irregular figure, stars from 12th to 13th magnitude".
Note About "h o n": Just as "H O N" refers to objects observed by William Herschel in 1802 but not published until they were included in John Herschel's Cape of Good Hope paper, "h o n" refers to objects observed by John Herschel while at the Cape of Good Hope but only noted in the Errata at the end of the Cape Catalog.
Physical Information: Apparent size 10 arcmin
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2658
Above, a 15 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2658

NGC 2659 (= OCL 752)
Discovered (Feb 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 8.6 open cluster (type III3m) in Vela (RA 08 42 41.0, Dec -44 58 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2659 (= GC 1694 = JH 3137, 1860 RA 08 37 50, NPD 134 27.3) is "a cluster, large, rich, pretty much extended, stars from 11th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 15 arcmin
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2659
Above, an 18 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2659

Removing artifacts in HST image

NGC 2660 (= OCL 759)
Discovered (Dec 29, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 8.8 open cluster (type I3m) in Vela (RA 08 42 39.5, Dec -47 12 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2660 (= GC 1695 = JH 3138, 1860 RA 08 38 01, NPD 136 42.3) is "a cluster, pretty small, much compressed, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle, stars from 13th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2660
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2660
Below, a 6 arcmin wide DSS image of the cluster
DSS image of open cluster NGC 2660
Below, a 2.8 arcmin wide DSS image of part of the cluster (for comparison with the HST image below)
DSS image of part of open cluster NGC 2660
Below, an HST image overlaid on the image above (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, processing Fabian RRRR)
(Post-processing Courtney Seligman)

HST image overlaid on a DSS image of part of open cluster NGC 2660

Need to remove artifact in wide-field image

NGC 2661 (= PGC 24632)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 8, 1886) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Cancer (RA 08 45 59.6, Dec +12 37 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2661 (= GC 1696 = WH III 50, Bigourdan, 1860 RA 08 38 16, NPD 76 52.7) is "extremely faint, considerably large, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2661
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2661
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2661

NGC 2662 (= PGC 24612)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1836) by
John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.8 elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Hydra (RA 08 45 32.0, Dec -15 07 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2662 (= GC 1697 = JH 3139, 1860 RA 08 39 00, NPD 104 47.3) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle, 15th magnitude star near". The second IC lists a corrected NPD (per Howe) of 104 36.8.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin.
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2662
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2662
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2662
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2662

NGC 2663 (= PGC 24590)
Discovered (Feb 8, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 10.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Pyxis (RA 08 45 08.2, Dec -33 47 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2663 (Swift list III (#40), 1860 RA 08 39 30, NPD 123 19.8) is "pretty faint, pretty small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 2.4 arcmin
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2663
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2663
Below, a 5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2663

NGC 2664
Discovered (Mar 20, 1830) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Cancer (RA 08 47 08.0, Dec +12 35 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2664 (= GC 1698 = JH 524, 1860 RA 08 39 30, NPD 76 53.2) is "a cluster, stars from 9th to 10th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 arcmin
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2664
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2664

NGC 2665 (= PGC 24634)
Discovered (1886) by
Frank Muller
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Hydra (RA 08 46 01.0, Dec -19 18 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2665 (Muller list II (#407), 1860 RA 08 39 38, NPD 108 48.6) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.5 arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2665
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2665
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2665
Below, a ? arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2665

NGC 2666
Discovered (Mar 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Lynx (RA 08 49 47.3, Dec +44 42 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2666 (= GC 1700 = JH 525, 1860 RA 08 40 20, NPD 42 25.7) is "a cluster, a little compressed".
Physical Information: A scatter of stars around HD 75135, whose position is that listed for the cluster.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2666
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2666

NGC 2667 (=
IC 2410 = PGC 24741)
Discovered (Feb 18, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 2667)
Discovered (Jan 13, 1901) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 2410)
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 08 48 27.2, Dec +19 01 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2667 (= GC 1699, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 40 21, NPD 70 27.8) is "extremely faint". The position precesses to RA 08 48 20.6, Dec +19 01 27, which is almost 7sW and 16"N of the presumably correct position. There are two faint spirals located just to the east of Dreyer's position, but the brighter one is almost certainly the correct one, for if d'Arrest had been able to see the fainter, he should have seen both; so the identity is reasonably certain. Both objects were photographed by Wolf, with the brighter one becoming IC 2410, thanks to the error in d'Arrest's position, and the fainter, previously unobserved galaxy becoming IC 2411.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2667, also showing IC 2411, which is sometimes bastardized as NGC 2667B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2667, also showing IC 2411
The box to the west of NGC 2667 shows Dreyer's position for the galaxy
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2667

IC 2411 (= "NGC 2667B" = PGC 24755)
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Cancer (RA 08 48 30.2, Dec +19 02 38)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: PGC 24755 is the fainter of the two galaxies noted at NGC 2667, and due to its proximity to that galaxy, sometimes called NGC 2667B. However, it has a perfectly good IC listing, so that is its proper designation, and this entry only notes the erroneous use of the NGC number. Therefore, see NGC 2667 for a wide-field image, and IC 2411 for anything else. (Warning: Wikisky shows both galaxies as NGC 2667.)

NGC 2668 (= PGC 24791)
Discovered (Feb 7, 1877) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SBab) in Lynx (RA 08 49 22.6, Dec +36 42 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2668 (Stephan list IX (#17), 1860 RA 08 40 24, NPD 52 46.0) is "very faint, very small, round, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.9 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2668
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2668
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2668

NGC 2669 (= OCL 768)
Recorded (964 CE) by
Abd-al-Rahman Al-Sufi
Discovered (Apr 11, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.1 open cluster (type II3p) in Vela (RA 08 46 18.0, Dec -52 56 18)
(Corwin gives two positions for the cluster, the other being RA 08 44 37.0, Dec -53 54 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2669 (= GC 1701 = JH 3140, Sûfi, 1860 RA 08 40 51, NPD 143 27.5) is "a cluster, large, poor, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 13th magnitude".
Discovery Note: The observational credit assigned to Al-Sufi is by Dreyer, as it is not noted in the GC, and presumably based on Al-Sufi's "Book of Fixed Stars", published in 964 CE.
Physical Information: Apparent size 14 arcmin
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2669
Above, an 18 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2669

NGC 2670 (= OCL 764)
Discovered (Feb 18, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 7.8 open cluster (type II2p) in Vela (RA 08 45 35.0, Dec -48 48 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2670 (= GC 1702 = JH 3142, 1860 RA 08 41 03, NPD 138 16.5) is "a cluster, pretty large, poor, a little compressed, stars from 13th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 7.0 arcmin
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2670
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2670

NGC 2671 (= OCL 745)
Discovered (May 1, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Mar 2, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 open cluster (type I3p) in Vela (RA 08 46 12.0, Dec -41 52 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2671 (= GC 1703 = JH 3141, Dunlop 489? 490?, 1860 RA 08 41 07, NPD 131 22.5) is "a cluster, pretty rich, a little compressed middle, stars from 12th to 13th magnitude". (Steinicke lists only Dunlop 489 as equal to this object.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.0 arcmin
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2671
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2671

NGC 2672 (= PGC 24790, and with
NGC 2673 = Arp 167)
Discovered (Mar 14, 1784) by William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 25, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 elliptical galaxy (type E1-2) in Cancer (RA 08 49 21.9, Dec +19 04 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2672 (= GC 1704 = JH 526 = WH II 80 = WH II 48, 1860 RA 08 41 23, NPD 70 24.8) is "pretty bright, pretty large, irregularly round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.8 arcmin. A physical pair with NGC 2673. Used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types as an example of galaxy type E1-2. Used (with NGC 2673) by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with a diffuse counter tail.
SDSS image of region near the interacting pair of elliptical galaxies, NGC 2672 and 2673, collectively also known as Arp 167
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2672, also showing NGC 2673
Below, a 3.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of the interacting pair of elliptical galaxies, NGC 2672 and 2673, collectively also known as Arp 167

NGC 2673 (= PGC 24792, and with
NGC 2672 = Arp 167)
Discovered (Mar 14, 1784) by William Herschel?
Also observed (Mar 25, 1827) by John Herschel?
Discovered (Dec 19, 1849) by George Stoney
A magnitude 13.5 elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Cancer (RA 08 49 24.2, Dec +19 04 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2673 (= GC 1705, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 41 25, NPD 70 24.9) is "very faint, very small, close east of h 526", (JH) 526 being NGC 2672.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney. (The attribution to William Herschel (as WH II 48 = WH II 80) and John Herschel (as JH 526) is by Steinicke; this will be explored further in the next iteration of this page.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin. A physical pair with NGC 2672, which see for images. Used (with NGC 2672) by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with a diffuse counter tail.

NGC 2674 (= PGC 24785)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
Not found (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)a?) in Hydra (RA 08 49 13.2, Dec -14 17 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2674 (Ormond Stone list I (#152), 1860 RA 08 41 35, NPD 103 46.4) is "extremely faint, small, nebulous?". The second IC adds "Not found by Howe (2 nights)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
DSS image of region near the lenticular galaxy NGC 2674
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2674
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2674
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the core of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the core of the lenticular galaxy NGC 2674

NGC 2675 (= PGC 24909)
Discovered (Dec 2, 1861) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 52 05.0, Dec +53 37 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2675 (= GC 1706, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 41 52, NPD 35 58.8) is "very faint, rich, 15th magnitude star 12 seconds of time to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin
SDSS image of region near the lenticular galaxy NGC 2675
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2675
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2675

NGC 2676 (= PGC 24881)
Discovered (Nov 24, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Ursa Major (RA 08 51 35.6, Dec +47 33 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2676 (Swift list VI (#33), 1860 RA 08 41 58, NPD 41 54.5) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, 4 pretty bright stars to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin
SDSS image of region near the lenticular galaxy NGC 2676
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2676
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2676

NGC 2677 (= PGC 24821)
Perhaps observed? (date?) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Mar 17, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Cancer (RA 08 50 01.3, Dec +19 00 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2677 (= GC 1707 = JH 527 = WH II 48?, 1860 RA 08 42 01, NPD 70 28.3) is "extremely faint, very small, partially resolved (some stars seen), (very small cluster)".
Discovery Note: Since Dreyer (and/or John Herschel) lists WH II 48 as equal to WH II 80 = NGC 2672, the presumption would be that William Herschel did not observe NGC 2677; but since the possibility is noted in the NGC, it is also shown above, albeit with a caveat. I will do some research on this in the next iteration of this page, and try to resolve the question. (Unlike NGC 2672 & 2673, Steinicke does NOT list William Herschel as an observer of NGC 2677.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin
SDSS image of region near the lenticular galaxy NGC 2677
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2677
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2677

NGC 2678
Discovered (Mar 15, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 18, 1828) by John Herschel
An open cluster in Cancer (RA 08 50 02.7, Dec +11 20 19)
(Corwin lists the position as RA 08 50 04.0, Dec +11 18 12, which is about the average of JH's values)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2678 (= GC 1708 = JH 528 = WH VIII 10, 1860 RA 08 42 33, NPD 78 08.8) is "a cluster, very little compressed, poor".
Physical Information: Apparent size 10 by 2.5 arcmin??
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 2678
Above, an 18 arcmin wide DSS image centered on the first position shown for NGC 2678

NGC 2679 (= PGC 24884)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 27, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0(r)a) in Cancer (RA 08 51 32.9, Dec +30 51 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2679 (= GC 1709 = JH 529 = WH III 294, 1860 RA 08 42 59, NPD 58 36.6) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, brighter middle, a double nebula with NGC 2680".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin. "Involved" with NGC 2680, which see.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2679 and the pair of stars listed as NGC 2680
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2679 and NGC 2680
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the two NGC "objects"
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2679 and the pair of stars listed as NGC 2680

NGC 2680
Recorded (Feb 26, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.5 pair of stars in Cancer (RA 08 51 33.7, Dec +30 51 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2680 (= GC 1710, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 43 00, NPD 58 36.6) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle, a double nebula with NGC 2679". The position is identical to that of NGC 2679, save for being a second of right ascension to the east; and on lower quality images there is a somewhat fuzzy looking object just to the east of the nucleus of the larger galaxy. As a result, NGC 2680 is listed in most databases as a 15th-magnitude compact galaxy of apparent size 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin, superimposed on or part of a physical pair with NGC 2679. However, in higher quality images it is obvious that it is merely the two stars immediately to the east of NGC 2679's nucleus. (Note: The color and contrast of the higher quality image have been adjusted to ensure that the sharpness of the image is not compromised, while emphasizing the different appearance of the stars compared to their nebular "companion".)
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2679 and the supposed compact galaxy NGC 2680
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 2679 shows NGC 2680 as a fuzzy object
Below, a SDSS image of the same region shows that NGC 2680 is just a pair of stars
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2679 and the pair of stars listed as NGC 2680

NGC 2681 (= PGC 24961)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 16, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Ursa Major (RA 08 53 32.7, Dec +51 18 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2681 (= GC 1711 = JH 530 = WH I 242, 1860 RA 08 43 28, NPD 38 09.8) is "very bright, very large, very gradaully then very suddenly much brighter middle equal to 10th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.6 by 3.3 arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2681
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2681
Below, a 3.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the two NGC "objects"
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2681

Swap M67 b/w image on M page for color DSS image; delete b/w from website

NGC 2682 (=
M67 = OCL 549)
Not observed (1779) by Barnaba Oriani
Discovered (1779) by Johann Koehler
Recorded (April 6, 1780) by Charles Messier
Also observed (Mar 3, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.9 open cluster (type II2m) in Cancer (RA 08 51 20.0, Dec +11 49 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2682 (= GC 1712 = JH 531, M67, Oriani, 1860 RA 08 43 34, NPD 77 40.6) is "a remarkble object, a cluster, very bright, very large, extremely rich, a little compressed, stars from 10th to 15th magnitude".
Discovery Note: Per Steinicke, this is one of eleven Messier objects for which Dreyer assigned the wrong discoverer. Although Oriani did observe three Messier objects while observing the comet of 1779 (and as a result was the discoverer of M61), he never observed M67.
Physical Information: From NOAO site: M67 is an open star cluster in the constellation Cancer. One of the oldest known such clusters, M67 is believed to be 10 billion years old. It contains approximately 500 stars within its 12 light-year diameter and is located some 2500 light-years away. Apparent size 25 arcmin?
DSS image of region near NGC 2682, also known as M67
Above, a 30 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2682

NGC 2683 (= PGC 24930)
Discovered (Feb 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 5, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.8 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)b) in Lynx (RA 08 52 41.3, Dec +33 25 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2683 (= GC 1713 = JH 532 = WH I 200, 1860 RA 08 43 59, NPD 56 03.4) is "very bright, very large, very much extended 39°, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: NGC 2683's recessional velocity of 410 km/sec is too small to yield a reliable estimate of distance, as its peculiar (non-Hubble-expansion) velocity could be a significant part of its overall motion. Ignoring that caveat, its redshift implies a distance of 18 million light years, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 18 to 45 million light years. Given its 9.3 by 2.2 arcmin apparent size, the galaxy is about 50 thousand light years across if at the closer distance, and over 100 thousand light years across if the more distant estimate is closer to being correct. (The galaxy's impressive appearance and well-organized structure suggest that the larger size and distance are more likely, but appearances are often misleading.) A study of irregularities in the velocity distribution of stars in the central region suggests that like our own galaxy, NGC 2683 has a barred structure; but because of the galaxy's nearly edge-on presentation, it is impossible to tell that from the images shown here. The HST closeup (third below) shows the relatively bright core (the reason it is classified as a Seyfert (type Sy 2) galaxy), extensive dust clouds outlined by the light of stars scattered throughout its disk, and numerous clusters of hot young blue stars scattered along the spiral arms which are mostly shrouded by the clouds of gas and dust lying in the plane of its galactic equator.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2683
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2683
Also shown are PGC 24945, 2030408 and 2032797 (see PGC Objects)
Also see the following entry for a discussion of the object labeled as 0853+3321
Below, an 8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2683
Below, a more nearly true-color image (Image Credit Doug Matthews/Adam Block/AURA/NSF/NOAO)
NOAO image of spiral galaxy NGC 2683
Below, a ? arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (rotated to allow more detail)
(Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive; Processing: Nikolaus Sulzenauer)
HST image of most of spiral galaxy NGC 2683

2MASXJ08524947+3321216 (= "0853+3321", above)
Not an NGC object but listed here because of its interesting characteristics
A 17th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Lynx (RA 08 52 49.6, Dec +33 21 21)
Physical Information: This catalog mostly ignores galaxies that do not have an NGC, IC or PGC entry; but in searching for such an identification of 2MASXJ08524947+3321216, information was obtained which seems of adequate interest to justify an entry, despite its not being included in any of those catalogs. Given its recessional velocity of 33600 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that the galaxy is about 1.5 billion light years away. However, for such distant objects, we must take into account the expansion of the Universe during the billion and a half years it took the light by which we see the object to reach us. Doing that indicates that we see the galaxy when it was about 1.375 billion light years away, and that it took the light it emitted at that time about 1.45 billion years to reach us (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the space through which the light passed on its way here). Given that and the galaxy's apparent size of about 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across. In other words, this faint speck is about what our galaxy would look like if seen by the inhabitants of worlds in that distant object.
SDSS image of region near 2MASXJ08524947+3321216
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of 2MASXJ08524947+3321216; for a wider view, see NGC 2683

NGC 2684 (= PGC 25024)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 7, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc) in Ursa Major (RA 08 54 54.0, Dec +49 09 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2684 (= GC 1714 = JH 533 = WH III 712, 1860 RA 08 45 02, NPD 40 18.6) is "faint, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, 4 small (faint) stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2684, also showing NGC 2686, NGC 2687, NGC 2688 and NGC 2689
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2684
Also shown are NGC 2686, 2687, 2688 and 2689
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2686

NGC 2685 (= PGC 25065 =
Arp 336), the Helix Galaxy
Discovered (Aug 18, 1882) by Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 11.3 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB(rs)a? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 08 55 34.7, Dec +58 44 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2685 (Tempel list VI (#8), 1860 RA 08 45 04, NPD 30 41) is "pretty faint, round, faint star in centre".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.6 by 2.5 arcmin. A polar ring galaxy. Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of "miscellaneous galaxies".
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2685, also known as the Helix Galaxy, or Arp 336
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2685
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2685, also known as the Helix Galaxy, or Arp 336

NGC 2686 (= PGC 25025 + PGC 25026)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1858) by
R. J. Mitchell
A pair of galaxies in Ursa Major
PGC 25026 = A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) at RA 08 54 58.9, Dec +49 08 32
PGC 25025 = A magnitude 16.2 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) at RA 08 55 00.6, Dec +49 08 33
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2686 (= GC 1715, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 45, NPD 40 20±) is "very faint, very small, double or single star close to east". Although Mitchell's description suggests that the eastern member of the pair might not be part of the nebula, his diagram clearly shows the object as double, so both galaxies must be considered part of the NGC object.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 25025 = 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin; of PGC 25026 = 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin
SDSS image of region near the lenticular galaxies listed as NGC 2686, also showing NGC 2684, NGC 2687, NGC 2688 and NGC 2689
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2686
Also shown are NGC 2684, 2687, 2688 and 2689
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair of galaxies comprising NGC 2686
SDSS image of the lenticular galaxies listed as NGC 2686

NGC 2687 (= PGC 25030 (+ PGC 25031?))
Discovered (Mar 11, 1858) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 55 06.0, Dec +49 09 22)
(and perhaps a magnitude 17.1 galaxy (type S0/a? or Sab?) at RA 08 55 05.0, Dec +49 09 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2687 (= GC 1716, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 45, NPD 40 19±) is "very small". The very rough position precesses to RA 08 54 51.4, Dec +49 09 25, on the southwestern rim of NGC 2684, which is such a poor position that it could make it difficult or impossible to tell which of the numerous galaxies in the area is NGC 2687. However, Mitchell's diagram clearly shows the various nebulae in the region, so there is no doubt that the galaxy (or pair of galaxies) listed above is/are the NGC object.
Note About PGC 25031's Inclusion In NGC 2687: Although PGC 25031 is often treated as part of the NGC object, Mitchell's diagram shows only a single object and his notes do nothing to alter that impression; and PGC 25031 is so faint that it probably did not influence his observation of its brighter companion, and should probably not be considered part of the NGC object. However, since every database I've checked lists the two objects by the non-standard designations of NGC 2687A and 2687B (and worse yet, assigns "B" to the brighter object which certainly is part of the NGC object), this entry (reluctantly) treats both galaxies as part of NGC 2687.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: PGC 25030: Vr 14720 km/sec, z 0.049101, Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?
Nothing appears to be known about PGC 25031 save for its apparent size; most likely, the inclusion of it as a part of NGC 2687 has led to the assumption that it is a physical companion of the brighter galaxy, and a lack of interest in verifying or disproving that supposition. I can't even find any effort to determine its type, and given the relatively low quality of the best images available, any opinion about the accuracy of the estimates I've given is left up to the reader.
Mitchell's diagram of the region near NGC 2684, showing NGC labels for each of the nebulae
Above, Mitchell's diagram of the region near NGC 2684, showing NGC labels for each nebula
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2687
Also shown are NGC 2684, 2686, 2688 and 2689
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2687; also showing NGC 2684, NGC 2686, NGC 2688 and NGC 2689
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2687, showing labels for both galaxies
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 25030, which is definitely part of NGC 2687, also showing PGC 25031, which may or may not be part of NGC 2687

NGC 2688 (= PGC 25048)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1858) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 15.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 55 11.6, Dec +49 07 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2688 (= GC 1717, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 45, NPD 40 21±) is "very very faint, small". Clearly shown on Mitchell's diagram of the region.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2688, also showing NGC 2684, NGC 2686, NGC 2687 and NGC 2689
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2688
Also shown are NGC 2684, 2686, 2687 and 2689
Below, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2688

NGC 2689 (= PGC 2333935)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1858) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 16.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 55 25.4, Dec +49 06 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2689 (3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 45, NPD 40 22±) is "very very faint, small". Note: PGC 25042 is sometimes misidentified as NGC 2689, but Mitchell's diagram clearly shows that the nebula is in a southeastern line with NGC 2686 and 2688, and must be the galaxy listed above.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Vr 16105 km/sec, z 0.053725, Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin?
Mitchell's diagram of the region near NGC 2684, showing NGC labels for each of the nebulae
Above, Mitchell's diagram of the region near NGC 2684, showing NGC labels for each nebula
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2689
Also shown are NGC 2684, 2686, 2687, 2688 and PGC 25042
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2689, also showing NGC 2684, NGC 2686, NGC 2687 and NGC 2688, and PGC 25042, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 2689
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2689

PGC 25042 (not =
NGC 2689)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 2689
A magnitude 16(?) elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 55 15.6, Dec +49 09 04)
Historical Misidentification: As noted above, this object is sometimes misidentified as NGC 2689 (e.g., NED incorrectly treats PGC 25042 and PGC 2333935 (= NGC 2689) as the same object); but as the discussion of that NGC object shows, that cannot be correct.
Physical Information: Vr 15540 km/sec, z ?, apparent size ?
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 25042, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 2689
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 25042; for a wider-field image see NGC 2689

NGC 2690 (= PGC 24926)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Hydra (RA 08 52 38.0, Dec -02 36 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2690 (Swift list III (#41), 1860 RA 08 45 14, NPD 92 05.8) is "pretty faint, small, extended". The second IC lists a corrected 1860 RA (per Howe) of 08 45 34.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2690
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2690
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2690

NGC 2691 (= PGC 25020)
Discovered (Mar 20, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)a? pec) in Lynx (RA 08 54 46.3, Dec +39 32 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2691 (= GC 1718 = WH II 658, 1860 RA 08 45 43, NPD 49 55.2) is "pretty faint, very small, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2691
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2691
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2691

NGC 2692 (= PGC 25142)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 17, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a?) in Ursa Major (RA 08 56 58.0, Dec +52 03 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2692 (= GC 1719 = JH 534 = WH III 831, 1860 RA 08 46 50, NPD 37 24.1) is "very faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2692, also showing PGC 25130
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2692
(Also labeled, since it might otherwise be thought an NGC object, is PGC 25130)
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2692

NGC 2693 (= PGC 25144)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 17, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Ursa Major (RA 08 56 59.3, Dec +51 20 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2693 (= GC 1720 = JH 535 = WH II 823, 1860 RA 08 46 58, NPD 38 07.1) is "pretty bright, a little extended, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.6 by 1.8 arcmin. Recessional velocity 4940 km/sec. A pair with NGC 2694.
SDSS image of of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2693, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 2694
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2693, also showing NGC 2694
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair of galaxies
SDSS image of elliptical galaxies NGC 2693 and 2694

NGC 2694 (= PGC 25143)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1850) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Ursa Major (RA 08 56 59.3, Dec +51 19 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2694 (= GC 5435, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 46 58, NPD 38 08) is "very faint, very small, 1 arcmin south of h 535", (JH) 535 being NGC 2693.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin. Recessional velocity 5090 km/sec. A pair with NGC 2693, which see for images.

NGC 2695 (= PGC 25003)
Discovered (Jan 6, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 12, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 08 54 27.1, Dec -03 04 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2695 (= GC 1721 = JH 536 = WH II 280, 1860 RA 08 47 23, NPD 92 32.1) is "pretty faint, considerably small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2695
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2695
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2695

NGC 2696 (= PGC 24851)
Discovered (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Hydra (RA 08 50 42.1, Dec -05 00 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2696 (Ormond Stone list I (#153), 1860 RA 08 47 30, NPD 94 27.2) is "extremely faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.3 arcmin
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2696
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2696
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2696
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2696

NGC 2697 (= PGC 25029)
Discovered (Jan 24, 1851) by
Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)a?) in Hydra (RA 08 54 59.4, Dec -02 59 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2697 (= GC 1725, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 08 47 58, NPD 92 27.2) is "very faint, very small, round".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case Bindon Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.1 arcmin
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2697
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2697
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2697
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2697

NGC 2698 (= PGC 25067)
Discovered (Mar 11, 1826) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Hydra (RA 08 55 36.5, Dec -03 11 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2698 (= GC 1726 = JH 538, 1860 RA 08 48 32, NPD 92 38.6) is "very faint, pretty small, round, 9th magnitude star 4 arcmin to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.5 arcmin
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2698, also showing NGC 2699 and NGC 2700
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2698, also showing NGC 2699 and 2700
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2698
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2698

NGC 2699 (= PGC 25075)
Discovered (Jan 4, 1862) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.6 elliptical galaxy (type E1) in Hydra (RA 08 55 48.8, Dec -03 07 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2699 (= GC 1727, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 08 48 44, NPD 92 35.0) is "very faint, small, round, 15th magnitude to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2699, also showing the stars presumed to be NGC 2700, NGC 2702 and NGC 2707, and galaxy NGC 2698
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2699, also showing NGC 2700, 2702, 2707 & 2698
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 2699 and "NGC 2700"
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2699, also showing the star presumed to be NGC 2700
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of NGC 2699 and 2700PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2699, also showing the star presumed to be NGC 2700
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2600 - 2649) ←NGC Objects: NGC 2650 - 2699→ (NGC 2700 - 2749)