Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Jan 16, 2019
Updated to current formatting standards
Checked/added Dreyer entries, updated Steinicke databases, Corwin positions
WORKING 2833: Add basic pix, update tags/captions
NEXT: Verify historical/tentative IDs, add physical information, look for hi-res pix

NGC 2800 (= PGC 26302)
Discovered (Mar 17, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 17, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 18 35.2, Dec +52 30 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2800 (= GC 1789 = JH 574 = WH III 832, 1860 RA 09 08 40, NPD 36 54.2) is "very faint, small, a little extended, star attached, star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2800
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2800
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2800

NGC 2801 (= PGC 26183)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)bc?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 44.2, Dec +19 56 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2801 (= GC 5468, Marth #157, 1860 RA 09 08 46, NPD 69 30) is "extremely faint, pretty large".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2801, also showing NGC 2806 and NGC 2807
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2801, also showing NGC 2806 and 2807
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2801

NGC 2802 (= PGC 26177)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 25, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 16 41.4, Dec +18 57 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2802 (= GC 1786 = JH 575 = WH III 62, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 08 47, NPD 70 27.1) is "very faint, small, round, mottled but not resolved, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 2803.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 2803
SDSS image of region neara spiral galaxies NGC 2802 and NGC 2803
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2802 and 2803
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair and their extended envelopes
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 2802 and NGC 2803
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2802
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2802

NGC 2803 (= PGC 26181)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 25, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)b? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 16 43.9, Dec +18 57 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2803 (= GC 1787 = JH 575 = WH III 63, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 08 51, NPD 70 27.6) is "very faint, small, round, mottled but not resolved, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 2802.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.9 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 2802
SDSS image of region neara spiral galaxies NGC 2802 and NGC 2803
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2802 and 2803
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair and their extended envelopes
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 2802 and NGC 2803
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2803
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2803

NGC 2804 (= PGC 26196 =
IC 2455)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2804)
Discovered (Apr 9, 1896) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2455)
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 50.0, Dec +20 11 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2804 (= GC 1791 = JH 577, 1860 RA 09 08 54, NPD 69 13.2) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2804
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2804
Below, a 2.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2804

NGC 2805 (= PGC 26410)
Discovered (Apr 2, 1791) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 09 20 20.4, Dec +64 06 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2805 (= GC 1790 = WH III 878, 1860 RA 09 08 55, NPD 25 18.6) is "very faint, large, round, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.3 by 4.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2805
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2805
Below, an 8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2805
Below, a 3.25 by 4 arcmin HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive, Fabian RRRR)
HST image of the central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 2805
Below, a 16 arcmin wide SDSS image showing NGC 2805, NGC 2814 and NGC 2820, and IC 2458
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2805, also showing NGC 2814, NGC 2820 and IC 2458

NGC 2806 (not =
PGC 26212)
Recorded (Feb 17, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Mar 22, 1876) by John Dreyer
A magnitude 14.8 star in Cancer (RA 09 16 56.8, Dec +20 04 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2806 (= GC 5469, Dreyer (using Lord Rosse's Leviathan), 1860 RA 09 09 01, NPD 69 20.9) is "very faint, stellar, preceding (west of) h 578", (JH) 578 being NGC 2809. The position precesses to RA 09 16 57.5, Dec +20 04 13, less than 0.2 arcmin east of the star listed above, which perfectly fits Dreyer's description of his observations of what became NGC 2807 and 2809 and of "A very faint star or considerably small, extremely faint nebula west of {the other nebulae} (sky bad), forming an equilateral traingle with 1792 and 1794 {the other nebulae} [suspected as nebula by d'Arrest, = 5469]), so the identification is certain. Unfortunately, the RNGC lists PGC 26212, which is far from the correct position and does not fit the description, as NGC 2806; so that identification is warned against in the title of this entry, and discussed in the entry below.
See the entry for NGC 2807 or 2809 for a wide-field view showing the star

PGC 26212 (= "NGC 2807A", and not =
NGC 2806)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2807A or misidentified as NGC 2806
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0?) in Cancer (RA 09 16 57.7, Dec +20 01 44)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.35 arcmin. In same field of view as NGC 2807 and NGC 2809.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 26212, which is also called NGC 2807A and often misidentified as NGC 2806
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 26212; see NGC 2807 or 2809 for wide-field images

NGC 2807 (= PGC 26213)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Cancer (RA 09 17 00.7, Dec +20 02 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2807 (= GC 1792, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 09 04, NPD 69 22.8) is "very faint, very small, h 578 is 7 seconds of time to the east and 2 arcmin to the north", (JH) 578 being NGC 2809.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.55 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2807, also showing PGC 26212 (which is sometimes called NGC 2807A and sometimes misidentified as NGC 2806), NGC 2809, part of NGC 2801, and the star that is NGC 2806
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2807
Also shown are NGC 2801, 2806 and 2809, and PGC 26212
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2807
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2807

NGC 2808 (= GCL 13)
Discovered (May 7, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Mar 8, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.2 globular cluster (type I) in Carina (RA 09 12 03.0, Dec -64 51 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2808 (= GC 1793 = JH 3152, Dunlop #265, 1860 RA 09 09 10, NPD 154 17.3) is "a remarkable object, a globular cluster, very large, extremely rich, very gradually extremely compressed middle, 45 seconds of time diameter, stars from 13th to 15th magnitude".
Discovery Note: The "45 seconds of time diameter" means that it takes 45 seconds for the cluster to cross the meridian. At its declination this does not correspond to the same size as it would if it took the same amount of time near the Celestial Equator, where time units occupy more than twice the distance in the sky. Still, it is a very impressive object, and if not so far south would undoubtedly have been noted in Messier's Catalog (and several other early lists of prominent objects).
Physical Information: Apparent size 14 arcmin? NGC 2808 is one of only seven (out of more than 150) globular clusters in the Milky Way with masses of more than a million Solar masses. The cluster is about 12.5 billion years old, but its Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram contains a surprise: there are three populations of stars with slightly different colors, probably indicating different proportions of helium. The "turn-off" point from the Main Sequence to the red giant branch is very narrow, so those three populations must be of nearly the same age, implying that during the cluster's formation there were three very closely spaced episodes of star-formation, each of latter ones using gases greatly enriched by material ejected into space by supernovae from earlier episodes (the very short lifetimes of very massive stars allowing a large increase in the helium content of interstellar gases despite the short interval between each episode of star-formation). Prior to this discovery it was thought that all the stars in globular clusters formed at the same time, but at the time the HST image below was published, at least three of the seven most massive globular clusters were thought to have multiple stellar populations, suggesting that such multiple-starburst episodes may be more common than not.
Observatorio Antilhue image of region near globular cluster NGC 2808
Above, a 20 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 2808
(Image Credit & © above and below Daniel Verschatse, Observatorio Antilhue, Chile; used by permission)
Below, a 15 arcmin wide image of the cluster
Observatorio Antilhue image of globular cluster NGC 2808
Below, a 3 arcmin wide HST image of the central portion of the cluster
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, A. Sarajedini (University of Florida) and G. Piotto (University of Padua [Padova])
HST image of the central part of globular cluster NGC 2808

NGC 2809 (= PGC 26220)
Discovered (Feb 24, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 17 06.9, Dec +20 04 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2809 (= GC 1794 = JH 578, 1860 RA 09 09 11, NPD 69 20.9) is "very faint, small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.2 arcmin? In same field of view as NGC 2806 and NGC 2807 (which see for a wide-field image).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2809, also showing PGC 26212 (which is sometimes called NGC 2809A and sometimes misidentified as NGC 2806), NGC 2807, and the star that is NGC 2806
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2809
Also shown are 2806 and 2807, and PGC 26212
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2809
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2809

NGC 2810 (= PGC 26514)
Discovered (Dec 3, 1788) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Ursa Major (RA 09 22 04.5, Dec +71 50 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2810 (= GC 1795 = WH III 749, 1860 RA 09 09 35, NPD 17 34.7) is "faint, considerably small, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.35 by 1.2 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2810
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2810, also showing PGC 3741261
Below, a 2 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2810
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2810

2MASX J09215851+7152013 (= "NGC 2810B" = "PGC 3741261")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2810B
A magnitude 16.2 galaxy (type S?? S0??) in
Ursa Major (RA 09 21 58.4, Dec +71 52 01)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: In general, adding letters to NGC designations produces nothing but confusion, and should be avoided. In this case, however, it is perhaps understandable, as the only searchable designation is the 2MASX designation shown above. There is also a PGC designation, but a search of the LEDA database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes (it is used, however, in the images above and below, as a 'simpler' designation than the 2MASX designation, and as a better way of denoting the galaxy than the "NGC" bastardization.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2 by 0.1 arcmin? Save for its apparent size (TBD), position and Steinicke's apparent magnitude, nothing appears to be available, and the images shown below have too low a resolution to be in any way certain of its classification (whence the double question marks).
DSS image of galaxy 'PGC 3741261', which is often called NGC 2810B
Above, a 0.4 arcmin DSS image of "PGC 3741261" (See NGC 2810 for a wide-field view)
Below, a 0.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of galaxy 'PGC 3741261', which is often called NGC 2810B

NGC 2811 (= PGC 26151)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 16, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Hydra (RA 09 16 11.1, Dec -16 18 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2811 (= GC 1796 = JH 580 = JH 3151 = WH II 505, 1860 RA 09 09 37, NPD 105 43.9) is "pretty bright, pretty small, extended, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3 by 1 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2811
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2811
Below, a 3.4 by 3.8 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 2811

NGC 2812 (= PGC 26242)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Cancer (RA 09 17 40.8, Dec +19 55 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2812 (= GC 5470, Marth #158, 1860 RA 09 09 46, NPD 69 29) is "extremely faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.1 arcmin? In same field of view as NGC 2813.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2812, also showing NGC 2813
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2812, also showing NGC 2813
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2812

NGC 2813 (= PGC 26252)
Discovered (Feb 17, 1865) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Cancer (RA 09 17 45.4, Dec +19 54 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2813 (= GC 5471, Marth #159, 1860 RA 09 09 50, NPD 69 29) is "faint".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.1 arcmin? In same field of view as NGC 2812.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2813
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2813, also showing NGC 2812
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2813

NGC 2814 (= PGC 26469)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 30, 1832) by John Herschel
Looked for (date?) but not observed by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 09 21 11.4, Dec +64 15 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2814 (= GC 1797 = WH II 868, 1860 RA 09 09 53, NPD 25 09.7) is "faint, small, irregular figure, 1st of 2 (d'Arrest, not found)", the 2nd of 2 being NGC 2820 (= NGC 2816).
Discovery Note: Corwin's historical discussion of NGC 2816 shows that JH 576 was actually an observation of NGC 2814, whence his observational credit above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2814, also showing NGC 2820 and IC 2458
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2814, also showing NGC 2820 and IC 2458
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2814
Below, a 16 arcmin wide SDSS image showing NGC 2814, NGC 2805 and NGC 2820, and IC 2458
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2814, also showing NGC 2805, NGC 2820 and IC 2458

NGC 2815 (= PGC 26157)
Discovered (Nov 20, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 21, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SB(r)b?) in Hydra (RA 09 16 19.7, Dec -23 38 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2815 (= GC 1799 = JH 3153 = WH III 242, 1860 RA 09 10 04, NPD 113 02.3) is "faint, small, a little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.5 by 1.1 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2815
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2815
Below, a 3.5 by 4.5 arcmin wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 2815

NGC 2816 (= PGC 26498 =
NGC 2820)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2820)
Also observed (Mar 30, 1832) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2820)
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 2820)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1832) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2816)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 09 21 45.6, Dec +64 15 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2816 (= GC 1800 = JH 579, 1860 RA 09 10 17, NPD 28 58.0) is "faint, pretty much extended".
Discovery Note: Per Corwin, this object was long thought nonexistent, and only identified as a duplicate observation of NGC 2820 recently. As a result, although duplicate entries are usually designated by their lower NGC number, most references to this galaxy are as NGC 2820.
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: Steinicke lists this as equal to IC 2458, because that is sometimes called NGC 2820A, and he presumably assumed that was the same as NGC 2820, which is a duplicate of NGC 2816. But IC 2458 is not the same object, as shown below the entry for NGC 2820; and instead, this is just another example of the kind of problems used by non-standard "letter" designations of NGC objects.
Physical Information: This entry will primarily contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 2820.

NGC 2817 (= PGC 26223)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c?) in Hydra (RA 09 17 10.5, Dec -04 45 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2817 (Swift list VI (#35), 1860 RA 09 10 20, NPD 94 09.0) is "very faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.7 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2817
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2817
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2817
Below, a 2.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2817

NGC 2818 (= P-K 261+08.1 = PGC3098795, in OCL 743)
Discovered (May 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Apr 7, 1837) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 planetary nebula in an open cluster in Pyxis (RA 09 16 01.4, Dec -36 37 36)
(The center of the cluster is near RA 09 16 12.0, Dec -36 37 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2818 (= GC 1801 = JH 3154 = Dunlop #564, 1860 RA 09 10 22, NPD 126 01.9) is "a remarkable object, a planetary nebula, pretty bright, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, in a large cluster".
PGC Designation Note: For purposes of completeness LEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object (labeling it as a planetary nebula) despite its not being a galaxy, but unlike most such designations a search of the database for the PGC designation DOES return a result, so it is shown without quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 arcmin?
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 2818
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2818
Below, a 2.25 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 2818
Below, a 2 by 1.3 arcmin wide HST image of the planetary nebula
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 2818

NGC 2819 (= PGC 26274)
Discovered (Dec 21, 1863) by
Albert Marth
Also observed (Apr 2, 1886) by Johann Palisa
A magnitude 12.8 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Cancer (RA 09 18 09.3, Dec +16 11 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2819 (= GC 5472, Marth #160, Palisa, 1860 RA 09 10 22, NPD 73 13.1) is "pretty bright, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2819
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2819
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2819

NGC 2820 (= PGC 26498 =
NGC 2816)
Discovered (Apr 3, 1791) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2820)
Also observed (Mar 30, 1832) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2820)
Also observed (date?) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 2820)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1832) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 2816)
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 09 21 45.6, Dec +64 15 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2820 (= GC 1798 = JH 576 = WH II 869, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 10 25, NPD 25 10.2) is "faint, small, extended, 2nd of 2", the other being NGC 2814.
Discovery Note: As will be explained in a discussion of the duplicate entry, this is actually JH 579, not JH 576 (which is NGC 2814).
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: Steinicke lists this as equal to IC 2458, presumably assuming that since that is sometimes miscalled NGC 2820A, it is the same as NGC 2820; but as shown below, IC 2458 is a different object (yet another problem called by using non-standard "letter" designations for NGC objects).
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.1 by 0.4 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2820, also showing NGC 2814 and IC 2458
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2820, also showing NGC 2814 and IC 2458
Below, a 4.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2820 and IC 2458
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2820, also showing IC 2458

IC 2458 (= PGC 26485 = "NGC 2820A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 2820A
A magnitude 15.5(?) irregular galaxy (type I0? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 09 21 29.8, Dec +64 14 14)
Warning Against Non-Standard Designations: The use of letters attached to an NGC/IC designation often leads to confusion, and should always be avoided. In this case, the object has a perfectly good NGC/IC designation of its own, so using the non-standard designation is even more egregious. (Also see the Warning in the entry for NGC 2820, for yet another problem created in this particular case.)
Physical Information: Given its perfectly good IC designation, see IC 2458 for anything else.

NGC 2821 (= PGC 26192)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pyxis (RA 09 16 48.0, Dec -26 48 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2821 (= GC 1802 = JH 3155, 1860 RA 09 10 40, NPD 116 14.8) is "extremely faint, 11th magnitude star attached".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.5 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2821
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2821
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2821
Below, a 2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2821

NGC 2822 (= PGC 26026)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.9 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SBA(r)0/a pec) in Carina (RA 09 13 50.4, Dec -69 38 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2822 (= GC 1803 = JH 3156, 1860 RA 09 10 41, NPD 159 03.7) is "pretty faint, very small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Note About Galaxy Classification: In many cases the galaxy types listed in this catalog are based on low-quality images or, if based on high-quality images, were done by me; and although I consider myself reasonably capable at classifying galaxies, I do not think of myself as an expert. For these reasons, most of the types are listed with a question mark, as an expert using a high-quality image might use a slightly different classification (though I'm happy to say that in this case the difference was very slight, as I used (R)SAB0(r)a? pec). Since the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image shown below is so much better than any previous image of this galaxy, I brought it to the attention of a true expert, Dr. Harold Corwin (who is one of those involved with the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxy Types), and he provided the classification shown above. He has used R' to indicate a partial outer ring, and although the bar has an odd appearance (whence SBA instead of just SB) it is definitely barred, so the B is underlined to emphasize that fact. The difference between (r)0/a and my 0(r)a is based on 0/a being a standard way of indicating a lenticular galaxy on the verge of being classified as a regular spiral, whereas when I insert (r), (s) or (rs) between the 0 and the a, I usually omit the slash; but either way, the (r) is needed to indicate the obvious ring around the central region. (An explanation of galaxy classification similar to this will eventually be added to one of the introductory pages for this catalog, at which point this note may be removed.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 3 by 2.2 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2822
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 2822, also showing magnitude 1.8 Miaplacidus
(Image above substantially reprocessed to deal with the glare from Miaplacidus)
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvein Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2822

NGC 2823 (= PGC 26340)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type SBa? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 19 17.5, Dec +34 00 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2823 (= GC 1805, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 10 44, NPD 55 19.6) is "very faint, small, round".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2823
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2823
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2823

NGC 2824 (= PGC 26330)
Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type (R)S(r)a?) in Cancer (RA 09 19 02.2, Dec +26 16 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2824 (= GC 5473, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 10 51, NPD 63 08.3) is "a cluster, small, stars faint, very compressed".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2824
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on NGC 2824
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy (Substantially reprocessed due to glare from HD 80217)
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2824

NGC 2825 (= PGC 26345)
Discovered (Jan 22, 1827) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Mar 13, 1850) by George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 22.4, Dec +33 44 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2825 (= GC 1806 = JH 581, 1860 RA 09 10 51, NPD 55 40.7) is "faint, pretty small, a little extended, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin? For now, see NGC 2831 for a wide-field view of the region.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2825, also showing NGC 2830, NGC 2831 and NGC 2832
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2825, also showing NGC 2830, 2831 and 2832
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2825

NGC 2826 (= PGC 26346)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
Also observed (Apr 30, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 24.2, Dec +33 37 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2826 (= GC 1807 = GC 1809, 3rd Lord Rosse, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 09 10 52, NPD 55 47.8) is "very faint, very small, round, h 581 is 7 arcmin to the north", (JH) 581 being NGC 2825.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2826, also showing the the star listed as NGC 2829
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2826, also showing NGC 2829
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2826

NGC 2827 (= PGC 26342 =
IC 2460)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by George Stoney (and later listed as NGC 2827)
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as NGC 2827)
Discovered (Feb 28, 1900) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 2460)
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type (R)S(r)ab?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 19.0, Dec +33 52 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2827 (= GC 1808, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 10 53, NPD 55 29.1) is "very faint, very small, round, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 2828 and 2833.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2827, also showing NGC 2828
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2827, also showing NGC 2828
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2827

NGC 2828 (= PGC 26365)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 34.8, Dec +33 53 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2828 (= GC 1810, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 11 03, NPD 55 28.6) is "very faint, very small, round, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 2827 and 2833.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2828, also showing NGC 2827 and NGC 2833
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2828, also showing NGC 2827 and 2833
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2828

NGC 2829 (= 2MASS J09193846+3339122)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.5 star in Lynx (RA 09 19 38.5, Dec +33 39 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2829 (= GC 1804, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 11 09, NPD 55 45) is "extremely faint, very small, round, northeast of 1807", (GC) 1807 being NGC 2826. The position precesses to RA 09 19 42.2, Dec +33 39 47, but there is nothing there. (Refer to Bindon Stoney's sketch in following the rest of this discussion.) However, since the position of Stoney's "eF" galaxy is not specified very exactly, there are three candidates that are generally given some consideration. Based on the apparent position of the object in Stoney's sketch, the best fit to his diagram appears to be the star listed above, but PGC 26356 and PGC 2036350 are sometimes listed as NGC 2829, so they are discussed in the two entries immediately below, and although the star cannot be considered a certain identification, it is as certain as can be expected without having been present on the night Stoney made his sketch.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Additional Discovery Notes: Stoney's observation of Mar 13, 1850 states "There are here 15 knots in all." His (brother's) sketch of Jan 8, 1851 is accompanied by the statement "A group of 3 neb. and others round them. Sketch made." Although the Historical Identification for this entry says that there is "nothing there" at the precessed position of Dreyer's NGC coordinates, the star listed above lies only an arcmin southwest of the position he estimated from Stoney's diagram, while the other candidates are considerably further from that position; and aside from the confusing inversion of the positions of the "3 neb.", Stoney's sketch shows the correct positions of all the other objects in the region, so although the identity of NGC 2829 might not normally be considered certain, it appears that the star listed above is by far the best candidate for the object in his sketch. (I consulted Corwin about this object, and he not only agrees with this analysis, but points out that the nebular candidates are so much fainter that Stoney probably couldn't have seen them at all.)
SDSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 2829, also showing NGC 2826, PGC 26356 and PGC 2036350
Above, an 8 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 2829
Also shown are NGC 2826, PGC 26356 and PGC 2036350, and Dreyer's position for NGC 2829

PGC 2036350 (not =
NGC 2829)
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 2829
A magnitude 15.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 52.3, Dec +33 38 58)
Historical (Mis)Identification: (Refer to Bindon Stoney's sketch in following this discussion.) Although often listed as NGC 2829 (though with a caveat, since its position is well off the mark), PGC 2036350 is nearly 2.5 arcmin east southeast of Dreyer's position, and well to the east of the "3 neb." in the sketch of the region, whereas Stoney's 'eF' object is well to their west. So despite the natural preference of modern researchers to choose a galaxy for the "eF" nebula, PGC 2036350 is actually an unlikely candidate for NGC 2829. Still, given its common (mis)identification as that NGC object, it must be mentioned here, whence this entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin?
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 2036350, which is sometimes misidentified as NGC 2829
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 2036350
(For wide-field images see NGC 2829 and Stoney's 1851 Sketch)

PGC 26356 + "PGC 3529450" (not =
NGC 2829)
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes misidentified as NGC 2829
A magnitude 15.3 pair of galaxies in Lynx (RA 09 19 30.7, Dec +33 38 53)
PGC 26356: A magnitude 15.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) at RA 09 19 30.3, Dec +33 38 54
"PGC 3529450": A magnitude 16.4 galaxy (type Irr?) at RA 09 19 31.1, Dec +33 38 52
Historical (Mis)Identification: (Refer to Bindon Stoney's sketch in following this discussion.) Although often listed as NGC 2829 (though with a caveat, since its position is well off the mark), this pair of galaxies is more than 2.5 arcmin west southwest of Dreyer's position for NGC 2829, and practically on the line between Stoney's "3 neb." and NGC 2826, so it is a poor fit for an object that was drawn well to the east of that line. Still, as one of three objects listed as possible candidates for NGC 2829, it deserves some mention, whence this entry.
Note About "PGC 3529450": Although LEDA assigns this object a PGC designation, a search of the database for that designation returns no entry, hence the quotes around the designation. To search a database for the object, use the designation SDSSJ091931.13+333852.0
Physical Information: Given the bluish color of the SDSS image of the eastern component, although usually classified as elliptical, there is certainly something odd about the classification (also note its odd shape in the images below), so I have listed it as irregular (with a question mark). Vr 7100 km/sec, nearly the same as the Vr (7120 km/sec) for PGC 26356, so the two galaxies are probably a physical pair, and the odd appearance of the fainter one may well be due to some kind of interaction between them.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 26356 and irregular galaxy 'PGC 3529450', which are sometimes misidentified as NGC 2829
Above, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair of galaxies
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the pair
(For wide-field images see NGC 2829 and Stoney's 1851 Sketch)
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 26356 and irregular galaxy 'PGC 3529450', which are sometimes misidentified as NGC 2829

Nebulae sketched (by Bindon Stoney) on Jan 8, 1851
Historical Identification of NGC 2830 and 2832: In 1785, William Herschel observed a "considerably bright" nebula in Lynx (also observed by John Herschel, in 1827). On Mar 13, 1850, George Stoney, using the 3rd Lord Rosse's 72-inch "Leviathan", observed 15 "knots" in the region, including the nebula observed by the Herschels. In August of 1850 George was replaced as Lord Rosse's assistant by his brother, Bindon Stoney, who must have done the sketch of the region made on Jan 8, 1851, which is reproduced below (rotated so that north is at the top, and west to the right). The SDSS image below that shows the galaxies corresponding to Stoney's "knots", labeled with their NGC designations. By and large, there is no problem identifying the objects, but there is a problem with the three galaxies at the center of the image (NGC 2830, 2831 and 2832). Namely, Stoney's diagram shows the largest and brightest of the three to the west (making it NGC 2830), and the fainter ones to its east (making them NGC 2831 and 2832). However, the descriptions of the three objects in the NGC and the SDSS image show that Stoney reversed their positions, as the largest and brightest is actually the one to the east (making it NGC 2832). So although Dreyer states that the Herschels discovered NGC 2830, they actually discovered what Dreyer listed as NGC 2832.
Historical Identification of NGC 2829: As discussed in the entry(ies) for NGC 2829, the position estimated by Dreyer for NGC 2829 from Stoney's diagram best fits a star located less than an arcmin from Dreyer's position, but modern researchers have preferred to choose galaxies for what historical observers saw, and as a result two galaxies that do not fit the sketch are usually listed as the best candidates for NGC 2829 (labeled in the sketch as an "eF" nebula). See the entry for that object and the entries for the two galaxies immediately following that entry for a more detailed discussion.
Sketch of the nebulae near NGC 2830, NGC 2831 and NGC 2832, as drawn by Bindon Stoney on Jan 8, 1851, rotated to show the normal orientation of sky maps
Above, Stoney's 1851 diagram, rotated so North is on top
(Since NGC 2829 is the only object shown that has an uncertain identification, it is marked on the sketch)
Below, an 18 by 26 arcmin wide SDSS image showing the NGC objects in the region
(Lines are drawn to correspond to Stoney's diagram, to aid comparison)
SDSS image of the region sketched by Bindon Stoney on Jan 8, 1851

NGC 2830 (= PGC 26371, and with
NGC 2831 and 2832 = Arp 315)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a? pec) in Lynx (RA 09 19 41.4, Dec +33 44 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2830 (= GC 1811 = JH 582 = WH I 113, 1860 RA 09 11 14, NPD 55 39.8) is "considerably bright, considerably large, extended, 1st of 3", the others being NGC 2831 and 2832. The position precesses to RA 09 19 47.4, Dec +33 44 58, right on the galaxy listed as NGC 2832, and the description of the three galaxies listed here and Bindon Stoney's sketch prove that it is the galaxy that the Herschels observed. The only problem is that based on Stoney's diagram, Dreyer reversed the positions of the three galaxies, so the galaxy listed above is the one described by Dreyer as NGC 2832, and the one described by him as NGC 2830 is actually NGC 2832 (which is why Stoney's diagram is compared to an SDSS image in the discussion immediately preceding this entry).
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.3 arcmin? With its companions, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Whether they are an actual physical group is uncertain, as they have recessional velocities differing by nearly 2000 km/sec.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 2830, also showing NGC 2831 and NGC 2832, with which it comprises Arp 315; also shown is NGC 2825
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2830, 2831 and 2832, also showing NGC 2825
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of Arp 315
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2831, lenticular galaxy NGC 2830 and elliptical galaxy NGC 2832, which comprise Arp 315
Below, a 1.3 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 2830
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 2830

NGC 2831 (= PGC 26376, and with
NGC 2830 and 2832 = Arp 315)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 13.3 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 45.5, Dec +33 44 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2831 (= GC 1812, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 11 15, NPD 55 39.2) is "faint, small, a little extended, brighter middle, 2nd of 3", the others being NGC 2830 and 2832.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin? With its companions, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Whether they are an actual physical group is uncertain, as they have recessional velocities differing by nearly 2000 km/sec.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2831, also showing NGC 2830 and NGC 2832, with which it comprises Arp 315; also shown is NGC 2825
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2830, 2831 and 2832, also showing NGC 2825
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of Arp 315
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2831, lenticular galaxy NGC 2830 and elliptical galaxy NGC 2832, which comprise Arp 315
Below, a labeled version of the image above, showing NGC 2830, 2831 and 2832
Labeled version of SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2831, lenticular galaxy NGC 2830 and elliptical galaxy NGC 2832, which comprise Arp 315

NGC 2832 (= PGC 26377, and with
NGC 2830 and 2831 = Arp 315)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 22, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (Mar 13, 1850) by George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 11.9 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Lynx (RA 09 19 46.8, Dec +33 44 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2832 (= GC 1813, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 11 16, NPD 55 38.9) is "faint, very small, round, 3rd of 3", the others being NGC 2830 and 2831. (Per the discussion of NGC 2830, Dreyer reversed the credit for the discovery of it and NGC 2832 as a result of an error in Bindon Stoney's sketch of Jan 8, 1851.)
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 2.0 arcmin? With its companions, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Whether they are an actual physical group is uncertain, as they have recessional velocities differing by nearly 2000 km/sec.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 2832, also showing NGC 2830 and NGC 2831, with which it comprises Arp 315; also shown is NGC 2825
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2830, 2831 and 2832, also showing NGC 2825
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of Arp 315
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 2831, lenticular galaxy NGC 2830 and elliptical galaxy NGC 2832, which comprise Arp 315

NGC 2833 (= PGC 26389)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Lynx (RA 09 19 57.9, Dec +33 55 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2833 (= GC 1814, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 11 18, NPD 55 27.6) is "faint, pretty small, round, 3rd of 3 in line", the others being NGC 2827 and 2828.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 2834 (= PGC 26400)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.5 elliptical galaxy (type E??) in Lynx (RA 09 20 02.5, Dec +33 42 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2834 (= GC 1815, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 11 33, NPD 55 42.5) is "very faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 2835 (= PGC 26259)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1884) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (February, 1885) by Edward Barnard
A magnitude 10.5 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hydra (RA 09 17 52.8, Dec -22 21 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2835 (Barnard, [Tempel list IX #??], 1860 RA 09 11 34, NPD 111 46.0) is "faint, 10th magnitude star involved on the east, between two 9th magnitude stars".
Discovery Note: In "Dreyer's" entry, Tempel's observation is listed in brackets, since Dreyer did not mention him.
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.6 by 4.4 arcmin?

NGC 2836 (= PGC 26017)
Discovered (Jan 29, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Carina (RA 09 13 45.0, Dec -69 20 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2836 (= GC 1816 = JH 3157, 1860 RA 09 11 42, NPD 158 45.8) is "faint, pretty small, round, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.0 arcmin?

NGC 2837
Recorded (Dec 16, 1827) by
John Herschel
A pair of ?th-magnitude stars in Hydra (RA 09 18 23.4, Dec -16 28 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2837 (= GC 1819 = JH 585, 1860 RA 09 11 45, NPD 105 53.2) is "extremely faint, round, brighter middle, star 8.5 seconds of time to east".
Physical Information:

NGC 2838 (= PGC 26434)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 18, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.7 elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Lynx (RA 09 20 43.0, Dec +39 18 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2838 (= GC 1820 = JH 583 = WH III 627, 1860 RA 09 11 50, NPD 50 07.3) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 2839 (= PGC 26425)
Discovered (Mar 13, 1850) by
George Stoney
Also observed (Jan 8, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Lynx (RA 09 20 36.3, Dec +33 39 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2839 (= GC 1821, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 12 06, NPD 55 46.6) is "very faint, small, round".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 2840 (= PGC 26445)
Discovered (Mar 10, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 5, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Lynx (RA 09 20 52.7, Dec +35 22 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2840 (= GC 1822 = JH 586 = WH III 827, 1860 RA 09 12 14, NPD 54 02.4) is "considerably faint, small, round, 10th magnitude star 2 arcmin to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 2841 (= PGC 26512)
Discovered (Mar 9, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 17, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 9.2 spiral galaxy (type SA(r)b) in Ursa Major (RA 09 22 02.7, Dec +50 58 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2841 (= GC 1823 = JH 584 = WH I 205, 1860 RA 09 12 19, NPD 38 26.0) is "very bright, large, very much extended 151, very suddenly much brighter middle equal to 10th magnitude star". The position precesses to RA 09 22 01.4, Dec +50 58 32, within 0.2 arcmin of the center of the galaxy, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: With a recessional velocity of only 640 km/sec, peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities make the 30 million light year redshift-based distance estimate very uncertain. So it is hardly surprising that the result is not in very good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 40 to 85 million light years (not that those are in much agreement with each other, either). The most generally agreed-upon distance is about 46 million light years. Using that distance and the galaxy's apparent size of 8.1 by 3.5 arcmin, NGC 2841 would be about 110 thousand light years across; but it is usually stated as being 150 thousand light years across, suggesting that larger distance estimates are still in general use. NGC 2841 has a relatively small number of hot, bright young stars lining its spiral arms, and few regions filled with heated gas lit up by such stars. This has led to the suggestion that perhaps an earlier stage of intense star formation swept gas that might form newer stars out of the central regions of the galaxy. This idea appears to be borne out by Chandra X-ray images of the galaxy, which show that its halo is filled with clouds of multi-million degree gases blown out of the galaxy at some time in the past. NED lists NGC 2841 as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 1), and as an "isolated" galaxy, meaning there are no other galaxies or galaxy groups in its general neighborhood.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 2841
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 2841
Below, an 8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 2841
Below, a more nearly true-color image of the region above
(Image Credit Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 2841
Below, the image above digitally adjusted to match the SDSS image above it
Misti Mountain Observatory image of spiral galaxy NGC 2841, digitally adjusted to match the 8 arcmin wide SDSS image in this entry
Below, a HST view of the central 20% of the galaxy; note the relative lack of bright stellar clouds
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration)
HST image of the central 20% of spiral galaxy NGC 2841
Below, a ? arcmin wide composite of X-ray and visible light images of the galaxy
(Image Credits: X-ray, NASA/CXC/U. Mass/Q.D.Wang; Optical, NOAO/KPNO )
Composite of X-ray and visible-light images of spiral galaxy NGC 2841

NGC 2842 (= PGC 26114)
Discovered (Mar 8, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Carina (RA 09 15 36.4, Dec -63 04 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2842 (= GC 1824 = JH 3158, 1860 RA 09 12 30, NPD 152 28.9) is "faint, very small, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 2843 (= PGC 26414)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 15.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Cancer (RA 09 20 28.8, Dec +18 55 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2843 (= GC 1825 = WH III 64, 1860 RA 09 12 41, NPD 70 28.9) is "a small (faint) star and nebula".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 2844 (= PGC 26501)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Lynx (RA 09 21 48.0, Dec +40 09 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2844 (= GC 1826 = WH III 628, 1860 RA 09 12 53, NPD 49 15.9) is "considerably faint, considerably small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 2845 (= PGC 26306)
Discovered (Feb 1, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Vela (RA 09 18 36.7, Dec -38 00 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2845 (= GC 1827 = JH 3159, 1860 RA 09 13 03, NPD 127 25.6) is "very faint, small, round, 12th magnitude star attached on southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 2846
Recorded (Apr 4, 1874) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Earl of Rosse
Also observed (date?) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of ?th-magnitude stars in Hydra (RA 09 19 40.5, Dec -14 40 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2846 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 13, NPD 104 15) is "a very small cluster (nebulous?), 10th magnitude star 4 arcmin to southeast". The first IC adds "Bigourdan's #153: RA 09 13 15, NPD 104 06, very faint, stellar, is doubtless = 2846".

NGC 2847
Discovered (Mar 5, 1855) by
R. J. Mitchell
A star-forming region in NGC 2848 (RA 09 20 08.7, Dec -16 31 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2847 (= GC 1828, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 09 13 30, NPD 105 55.0) is "very faint, small, involved in h 587, on the northwest", (JH) 587 being NGC 2848.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information:

NGC 2848 (= PGC 26404)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Dec 16, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hydra (RA 09 20 09.8, Dec -16 31 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2848 (= GC 1829 = JH 587 = WH III 488, 1860 RA 09 13 32, NPD 105 55.6) is "very faint, considerably large, extended 45, gradually a little brighter middle, 11th magnitude star 3 arcmin to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.5 arcmin? Includes the star-forming region listed as NGC 2847

NGC 2849 (= OCL 756)
Discovered (Jan 22, 1838) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 open cluster (type II2m) in Vela (RA 09 19 23.0, Dec -40 31 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 2849 (= GC 1830 = JH 3160, 1860 RA 09 13 53, NPD 129 57.4) is "extremely faint, considerably large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, partially resolved (some stars seen)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin?
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 2750 - 2799) ←&3msp;NGC Objects: NGC 2800 - 2849&3msp;→ (NGC 2850 - 2899)