Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3650 - 3699) ←NGC Objects: NGC 3700 - 3749 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (NGC 3750 - 3799)
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3700, 3701, 3702, 3703, 3704, 3705, 3706, 3707, 3708, 3709, 3710, 3711, 3712, 3713, 3714, 3715, 3716,
3717, 3718, 3719, 3720, 3721, 3722, 3723, 3724, 3725, 3726, 3727, 3728, 3729, 3730, 3731, 3732, 3733,
3734, 3735, 3736, 3737, 3738, 3739, 3740, 3741, 3742, 3743, 3744, 3745, 3746, 3747, 3748, 3749

Page last updated Apr 14, 2020
Completed entry for NGC 3713 per a personal request
Updating to standard formatting, added Dreyer entries, checked Steinicke databases
Checked Corwin positions
WORKING 3702: Checking IDs
Updated and completed entry for NGC 3717 and 3711
Check physical data, add/revise pix/tags

NGC 3700 (= PGC 35413)
Discovered (Mar 31, 1867) by
Robert Ball
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)ab?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 29 38.6, Dec +35 30 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3700 (= GC 5566, Ball (using Lord Rosse's 72-inch Leviathan), 1860 RA 11 21 48, NPD 53 48.7) is "extremely faint, h 899 preceding (to the west)", (JH) 899 being NGC 3694. The position precesses to RA 11 29 18.5, Dec +35 25 04, but there is nothing there (though JH 899 is due west of the incorrect position). However, per Corwin, although the positions are well off the mark, Ball observed the galaxy listed above and what became NGC 3694 and 3695 on the same night, and gave descriptions and positions of 3695 and 3700 relative to 3694 that are a perfect fit to their actual locations, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below).
SDSS image of region near NGC 3700
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 3700
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of NGC 3700

NGC 3701 (= PGC 35405)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 28, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)bc?) in Leo (RA 11 29 28.9, Dec +24 05 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3701 (= GC 2433 = JH 901 = WH II 349, 1860 RA 11 22 05, NPD 65 07.9) is "pretty faint, pretty large, a little extended". The position precesses to RA 11 29 28.0, Dec +24 05 51, well within the northwestern outline of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2795 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 3701 is about 130 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 85 to 180 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 1.85 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 70 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3701
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 3701
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3701

NGC 3702 (= PGC 35448)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Crater (RA 11 30 13.5, Dec -08 51 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3702 (Leavenworth list II (#439), 1860 RA 11 22 05, NPD 98 13.1) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, gradually a little brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 11 29 11.1, Dec -08 59 21, but there is nothing there.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 3703 (= PGC 170146?)
Discovered (Dec 31, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
A magnitude 14.7 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Crater (RA 11 29 09.4, Dec -08 26 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3703 (Ormond Stone list I (#187), 1860 RA 11 22 30, NPD 97 51.1) is "extremely faint, very small, gradually brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 3704 (= PGC 35435 (almost certainly not =
IC 703))
Discovered (Feb 23, 1878) by Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (1880) by Andrew Common
Looked for but not found (Jan 1898 to Jun 1899) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 12.9 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Crater (RA 11 30 04.7, Dec -11 32 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3704 (Temple list V(#10, also list I #35?), Common, 1860 RA 11 22 44, NPD 100 44.4) is "very faint, pretty small, 9th or 10th magnitude star 2 arcmin to south southeast". The second IC notes "Not found by Howe (4 nights, 1898-99). Tempel saw 3707 four times, 3704 only once (place by sketch, 25 May 1881, in private letter). Common has '2 faint, round, on the parallel (of declination), star symmetrically placed between.' I assumed, perhaps erroneously, that 3704 and 07 are the same as Common's, the place of which is RA 11 22 57, NPD 100 33.3, though Tempel's nebulae are not on the parallel". Howe notes that he saw not only 3707 on all four dates but also the star supposedly to the southeast of 3704, but could not find 3704.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 3705 (= PGC 35440)
Discovered (Jan 18, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jan 18, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Leo (RA 11 30 07.4, Dec +09 16 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3705 (= GC 2434 = GC 2436 = JH 902 = JH 903 = WH II 13, 1860 RA 11 22 53, NPD 79 57.1) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round, very suddenly much brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.9 by 2.0 arcmin?

IC 2887 (= PGC 35470 = "NGC 3705A")
Discovered (Mar 27, 1906) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 2887)
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 3705A
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Leo (RA 11 30 29.7, Dec +09 23 17)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: In general, adding a letter to an NGC/IC designation is a bad idea, since there is no standard for adding the letter, and different letters are often used for the same object, and the same letter for different objects, which is bound to lead to confusion. In this particular case, the non-standard use is even more outrageous, since the object in question already has a perfecty good IC designation. So this entry serves only as a warning about such usage.
Physical Information: See IC 2887 for anything else.

PGC 1361422 (= "NGC 3705B")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 3705B
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Leo (RA 11 29 43.7, Dec +09 12 21)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: In general, adding a letter to an NGC/IC designation is a bad idea, since there is no standard for adding the letter, and different letters are often used for the same object, and the same letter for different objects, which is bound to lead to confusion. So this entry serves only as a warning about such usage.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 3706 (= PGC 35417)
Discovered (May 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Centaurus (RA 11 29 44.4, Dec -36 23 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3706 (= GC 2435 = JH 3346, 1860 RA 11 22 54, NPD 125 37.6) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 1.8 arcmin?

NGC 3707 (= PGC 35446 (almost certainly not =
IC 704))
Discovered (Feb 23, 1878) by Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (1880) by Andrew Common
Also observed (Jan to Jun 1898) by Herbert Howe (while looking for NGC 3704)
A magnitude 14.7 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Crater (RA 11 30 11.5, Dec -11 32 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3707 (=Temple list V (#10), Common, 1860 RA 11 23 00, NPD 100 46.4) is "very faint, small, 15th magnitude star (nebulous?) 2 seconds of time following (to the east)".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 3708
Recorded (Dec 31, 1885) by
Ormond Stone
A lost or nonexistent object in Leo (RA 11 30 39.2, Dec -03 13 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3708 (Ormond Stone list I (#188), 1860 RA 11 23 30, NPD 92 27.1) is "very faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information:

NGC 3709
Recorded (1886) by
Ormond Stone
A lost or nonexistent object in Leo (RA 11 30 39.2, Dec -03 15 21)
Historical Identification: NGC 3709 (Ormond Stone list I (#189), 1860 RA 11 23 30, NPD 92 29.1) is "extremely faint, extremely small".
Physical Information:

NGC 3710 (= PGC 35502)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 25, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Leo (RA 11 31 06.9, Dec +22 46 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3710 (= GC 2437 = JH 904 = WH II 350, 1860 RA 11 23 44, NPD 66 27.7) is "faint, small, 7th or 8th magnitude star 5 arcmin to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3711 (= PGC 35392)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (Jan to June, 1898) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)SBab?) in Crater (RA 11 29 25.5, Dec -11 04 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3711 (Leavenworth lsit II (#440), 1860 RA 11 23 53, NPD 100 18.1) is "extremely faint, very small, 9th magnitude star 4 arcmin to south". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 11 22 22. The position precesses to RA 11 29 27.0, Dec -11 04 21, about 0.9 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. The only question is whether the fainter companion on its northeast rim should be included in the NGC entry, as discussed in the Note immediately following.
Historical Identification Note: The fainter galaxy to the northeast of NGC 3711 is usually considered to be a part of the NGC object, but it almost certainly would have looked like a faint star to both Leavenworth and Howe, and only the fact that the description doesn't say "faint star attached on northeast" lends any credence to the idea that PGC 3771864 should be considered to be part of NGC 3711; and as discussed in the entry immediately below, the two galaxies are almost certainly not connected in any way, save for the probably incorrect supposition that the fainter one might be part of the NGC entry. Even if the fainter galaxy is part of NGC 3711, the two galaxies are almost certainly not a physical pair, as their recessional velocities differ by more than 1200 km/sec, and the PanSTARRS images show no sign of interaction between them.
Modern Identification Note: Steve Gottlieb has been engaged for many years in a visual examination of all NGC/IC objects, and his description of NGC 3711 is not only more accurate than that of the 19th-century observers, but makes no mention of the fainter object, and is most consistent with an observation of only the bright core of the spiral than anything else, suggesting that it is most likely that the fainter galaxy made no impression at all on the earlier observers.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 3980 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 3711 is about 185 million light years away, far closer than its supposed companion. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 50 thousand light years across.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3711, also showing PGC 3771864, which is usually considered (probably incorrectly) to be part of NGC 3711
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 3711, also showing PGC 3771864
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of the apparent pair
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3711 and PGC 3771864, which is usually considered (probably incorrectly) to be part of NGC 3711
Below, a 1 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of NGC 3711 and PGC 3771864
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3711 and PGC 3771864, which is usually considered (probably incorrectly) to be part of NGC 3711

PGC 3771864 (probably not part of
NGC 3711)
Probably not an NGC object but listed here since often considered to be part of NGC 3711
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Crater (RA 11 29 26.1, Dec -11 04 25)
Historical (Mis?)Identification: As noted in the entry for NGC 3711, PGC 3771864 is generally presumed to be part of that entry, but it was probably taken for a faint star not worth mentioning by both Leavenworth and Howe, and in any event is much further away than its apparent companion, and cannot be either physically associated with it, or interacting with it. Nor is there any sign of interaction between the two in PanSTARRS images of the "pair", which are by far the best images currently available.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5325 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 3771864 is about 245 to 250 million light years away, in fair agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 340 to 345 million light years, but only in the sense that it shows that the galaxy is much further away than NGC 3711, and cannot be interacting with it. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images of NGC 3711), it is about 15 to 20 thousand light years across.
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 3771864, which is usually considered (probably incorrectly) to be part of NGC 3711
Above, a 0.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of PGC 3771864; for all other images, see NGC 3711

NGC 3712 (= PGC 35556 =
NGC 3714)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3714)
Also observed (Dec 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3714)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3712)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 31 53.6, Dec +28 21 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3712 (= GC 2438 = JH 905, 1860 RA 11 24 15, NPD 60 44.1) is "faint, very small, round, suddenly much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 11 31 39.7, Dec +28 29 35,
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3713 (= PGC 35546 and probably =
NGC 3927)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3713)
Also observed (Feb 17, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3713)
Discovered (Apr 27, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 3927)
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Leo (RA 11 31 42.0, Dec +28 09 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3713 (= GC 2439 = JH 906 = WH II 367, 1860 RA 11 24 17, NPD 61 04.4) is "faint, considerably small, round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 11 31 41.4, Dec +28 09 17, well within the northwestern outline of the galxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. (See NGC 3927 for a discussion of the duplicate listing.)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 7290 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 3713 is about 340 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 315 million light years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 330 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 335 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.15 by 0.6 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 110 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 3713
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 3713
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 3713

NGC 3714 (= PGC 35556 =
NGC 3712)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3714)
Also observed (Dec 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3714)
Discovered (Mar 26, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 3712)
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 31 53.6, Dec +28 21 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3714 (= GC 2440 = JH 907 = WH III 353, 1860 RA 11 24 29, NPD 60 52.0) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Although NGC 3714 represents the earlier observation, current tradition is to use the earlier number, so see NGC 3712 for anything else.

NGC 3715 (= PGC 35540)
Discovered (Mar 27, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 16, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Crater (RA 11 31 32.4, Dec -14 13 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3715 (= GC 2441 = JH 3347 = WH II 562, 1860 RA 11 24 29, NPD 103 27.6) is "pretty faint, small, round, very gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 3716 (= PGC 35545)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Leo (RA 11 31 41.1, Dec +03 29 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3716 (= GC 5567, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 11 24 33, NPD 85 44.7) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 3717 (= PGC 35539)
Discovered (Apr 29, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 spiral galaxy (type SAb?) in Hydra (RA 11 31 32.0, Dec -30 18 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3717 (= GC 2442 = JH 3348, 1860 RA 11 24 37, NPD 119 29.1) is "pretty bright, small, much extended, 13th magnitude star attached". The position precesses to RA 11 31 32.4, Dec -30 15 25, just under 3 arcmin north of the center of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1735 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 3717 is about 80 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 45 to 80 million light years (the HST press release uses 60 million light years). Given that and its apparent size of about 6.7 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 155 thousand light years across. The prominent dust lanes on its right are in front of the nucleus (from our viewpoint), partially hiding it, particularly in the sharper images. The bright region on the left is therefore the far side of the galaxy.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3717, also showing part of IC 2913
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 3717, also showing part of IC 2913
Below, a 6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of spiral galaxy NGC 3717
Below, a 1.75 by 2.75 arcmin wide image of part of the galaxy
(Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, D. Rosario)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 3717

NGC 3718 (= PGC 35616 =
Arp 214)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1789) by William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 10, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.8 spiral galaxy (type SBa? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 11 32 34.9, Dec +53 04 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3718 (= GC 2443 = JH 908 = WH I 221, 1860 RA 11 24 46, NPD 36 09.4) is "pretty bright, very large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Gravitationally interacting with NGC 3729, which see. Apparent size 8.1 by 4.0 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a galaxy with irregularities, absorption, and resolution.
SDSS image of NGC 3718
Above, an 8 by 12 arcmin wide/high "closeup" of NGC 3718
Below, a 12 by 18 arcmin image, adjusted to show the outer arms
Also visible (at bottom) is the much more distant Hickson Compact Group 56 of interacting galaxies
SDSS image of NGC 3718, digitally altered to highlight its outer regions

NGC 3719 (= PGC 35581)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Leo (RA 11 32 13.5, Dec +00 49 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3719 (= GC 5568, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 11 25 05, NPD 88 24.3) is "very faint, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 3720.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 3720 (= PGC 35594)
Discovered (Mar 15, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Leo (RA 11 32 21.6, Dec +00 48 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3720 (= GC 5569, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 11 25 14, NPD 88 25.3) is "very faint, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 3719.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3721 (= PGC 35727)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Crater (RA 11 34 07.8, Dec -09 28 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3721 (Leavenworth list II (#441), 1860 RA 11 25 29, NPD 98 41.1) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Discovery Notes: Corwin lists the object (PGC 170156) at RA 11 31 53.4, Dec -09 31 56 as a more likely candidate.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 3722 (= PGC 35746)
Discovered (1880) by
Andrew Common
Also observed (1886) by Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.1 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Crater (RA 11 34 23.3, Dec -09 40 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3722 (Leavenworth list II (#??), (Common #20), 1860 RA 11 25 29, NPD 98 54.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus, 1st of 2", the other being NGC 3724.
Discovery Notes: Steinicke lists Common as the discoverer, and Leavenworth as a separate discoverer, due to his not knowing about Common's observation (as, apparently, neither was Dreyer). Also, Corwin lists the object (PGC 170153) at RA 11 31 45.9, Dec -09 40 21 as a more likely candidate (and notes its companion, (2MASXJ11314455-0940321 = "PGC 3772521") at RA 11 31 44.6, Dec -09 40 32; Vr 6447 km/sec (see SIMBAD)).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3723 (= PGC 35604)
Discovered (1880) by
Andrew Common
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Crater (RA 11 32 30.6, Dec -09 58 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3723 (Common (#19), 1860 RA 11 25 32, NPD 99 10) is "faint, small, ronnd".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 3724 (= PGC 35757)
Discovered (1880) by
Andrew Common
Also observed (1886) by Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Crater (RA 11 34 28.7, Dec -09 39 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3724 (Leavenworth list II (#??), (Common #20), 1860 RA 11 25 41, NPD 98 56.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus, second of 2", the other being NGC 3722.
Discovery Notes: Steinicke lists Common as the discoverer, and Leavenworth as a separate discoverer, due to his not knowing about Common's observation (as, apparently, neither was Dreyer). Corwin suggests that it is more likely that NGC 3724 = IC 2910, at RA 11 31 54.7, Dec -09 43 31.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 3725 (= PGC 35698)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 14, 1831) by John Herschel
A 1magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 33 40.5, Dec +61 53 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3725 (= GC 2444 = JH 909 = WH II 836, 1860 RA 11 25 43, NPD 27 21.5) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually a very little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 3726 (= PGC 35676)
Discovered (Feb 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 7, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.4 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 33 21.1, Dec +47 01 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3726 (= GC 2445 = JH 910 = WH II 730, 1860 RA 11 25 45, NPD 42 11.0) is "pretty bright, very large, a little extended 0°, very suddenly much brighter middle equal to 15th magnitude star, 11th magnitude star to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0 by 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 3727 (= PGC 35697)
Discovered (1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Crater (RA 11 33 40.9, Dec -13 52 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3727 (Leavenworth list II (#444), 1860 RA 11 25 47, NPD 103 06.1) is "extremely faint, extremely small, round, gradually brighter middle and nucleus, 11th magnitude star 1 arcmin to southeast". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 11 26 37.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 3728 (= PGC 35669)
Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 19, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Leo (RA 11 33 15.8, Dec +24 26 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3728 (= GC 2446 = JH 912 = WH II 351, 1860 RA 11 26 02, NPD 64 47.0) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 3729 (= PGC 35711)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Feb 10, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SBa pec) in Ursa Major (RA 11 33 49.3, Dec +53 07 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3729 (= GC 2447 = JH 911 = WH I 222, 1860 RA 11 26 02, NPD 36 05.8) is "pretty bright, pretty large, a little extended 0°±, gradually brighter middle, 12th magnitude star near".
Physical Information: Gravitationally interacting with NGC 3718. Apparent size 2.9 by 1.9 arcmin?
SDSS image of NGC 3729
Above, a 3 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3729
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near NGC 3729
Below, an 18 arcmin wide region centered between NGC 3729 and 3718
SDSS image of region between NGC 3718 and 3729

NGC 3730 (= PGC 35743? =
NGC 3732?)
Discovered (1886) by Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (date?) by Andrew Common
A magnitude 13.0 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Crater (RA 11 34 16.9, Dec -09 34 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3730 (Common (#?), Leavenworth list II (#445), 1860 RA 11 26 17, NPD 98 50.1) is "extremely faint, small, a little extended 140°, gradually a little brighter northern middle".
Discovery Note: Steinicke does not list Common as an observer of the object. I will check that out, but since Dreyer listed Common as an observer, it is possible that he observed it. On the other hand, as noted below, Steinicke once thought it could be the same as 3732, which Common did observe, so perhaps Dreyer confused Common's observation of the objects.
Physical Information: Vr 5515 km/sec. Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin? (Data applies to PGC 35743, whether it is NGC 3730 or not.) (Note to self: Per Corwin, the identification is uncertain at best; Steinicke wonders if it could be the same as 3732, which Steinicke attributes to Common, but Corwin's discussion makes that impossible. Need to sort this out in the next iteration of this page.)

Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 35744) at RA 11 34 16.3, Dec -09 35 16 (Vr 6130 km/sec)
The recessional velocity difference is large, but there does appear to be some kind of interaction, past or present

NGC 3731 (= PGC 35731)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Leo (RA 11 34 11.7, Dec +12 30 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3731 (= GC 2448 = WH III 80, 1860 RA 11 27 06, NPD 76 43.8) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.9 arcmin?

Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 213857) at RA 11 34 11.9, Dec +12 30 15
However, its recessional velocity is over 20000 km/sec larger

NGC 3732 (= PGC 35734 (=
NGC 3730??)
Discovered (Mar 4, 1786) by William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 9, 1828) by John Herschel
Also observed (1880) by Andrew Common
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Crater (RA 11 34 14.0, Dec -09 50 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3732 (= GC 2449 = JH 913 = WH II 552, 1860 RA 11 27 08, NPD 99 03.8) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 14th magnitude star to southwest at position angle 225°".
Discovery Note: Steinicke lists Common as an observer of 3732, but not 3730, whereas Dreyer reverses that. Need to analyze that before finalizing page.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 3733 (= PGC 35797)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 35 01.6, Dec +54 51 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3733 (= GC 2450 = WH III 771, 1860 RA 11 27 16, NPD 34 23.1) is "extremely faint, small, irregularly round, 6th magnitude star to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.9 by 2.2 arcmin?

NGC 3734 (= PGC 35773)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1794) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 7, 1836) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Crater (RA 11 34 40.7, Dec -14 04 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3734 (= GC 2451 = JH 3349 = WH III 935, 1860 RA 11 27 37, NPD 103 19.1) is "extremely faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 3735 (= PGC 35869)
Discovered (Dec 7, 1801) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 28, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Draco (RA 11 35 57.3, Dec +70 32 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3735 (= GC 2452 = JH 914 = WH I 287, 1860 RA 11 27 40, NPD 18 41.6) is "pretty bright, large, much extended 130°, much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3736 (= PGC 35835)
Discovered (1885) by
Ralph Copeland
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Draco (RA 11 35 41.9, Dec +73 27 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3736 (Copeland, 1860 RA 11 27 44, NPD 15 45.5) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 3737 (= PGC 35840)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 35 36.4, Dec +54 56 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3737 (= GC 2453 = WH III 772, 1860 RA 11 27 51, NPD 34 16.5) is "very faint, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin?

PGC 94195 (= "NGC 3737A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 3737A
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Ursa Major (RA 11 35 31.5, Dec +54 55 52)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: In general, adding a letter to an NGC/IC designation is a bad idea, since there is no standard for adding the letter, and different letters are often used for the same object, and the same letter for different objects, which is bound to lead to confusion. So this entry serves only as a warning about such usage.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 3738 (= PGC 35856, and =
Arp 234)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by William Herschel
A magnitude 11.7 irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 35 48.5, Dec +54 31 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3738 (= GC 2454 = WH II 783, 1860 RA 11 28 06, NPD 34 41.9) is "pretty bright, pretty large, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 1.9 arcmin? Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of galaxies with fission.
HST image of irregular galaxy NGC 3738
Above, a HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)

NGC 3739 (= PGC 35841)
Discovered (Mar 16, 1869) by
Otto Struve
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Leo (RA 11 35 37.6, Dec +25 05 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3739 (= GC 5570, Otto Struve, 1860 RA 11 28 08, NPD 64 07) is "very faint, between two 12th magnitude stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 3740 (= PGC 35883)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 25, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Ursa Major (RA 11 36 12.3, Dec +59 58 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3740 (= GC 2455 = JH 915 = WH III 847, 1860 RA 11 28 24, NPD 29 15.2) is "very faint, very small, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 3741 (= PGC 35878)
Discovered (Mar 19, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Ursa Major (RA 11 36 06.0, Dec +45 17 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3741 (= GC 2456 = JH 916, 1860 RA 11 28 34, NPD 43 56.4) is "very faint, small, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 3742 (= PGC 35833)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab? pec) in Centaurus (RA 11 35 32.5, Dec -37 57 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3742 (= GC 2457 = JH 3350, 1860 RA 11 28 37, NPD 127 10.6) is "pretty faint, pretty large, very little extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.7 arcmin?

NGC 3743 (= PGC 35855)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1874) by
Ralph Copeland
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Leo (RA 11 35 57.3, Dec +21 43 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3743 (Copeland (using Lord Rosse's 72-inch Leviathan), 1860 RA 11 28 38, NPD 67 30.0) is "faint, small, round, 9th magnitude star 1 arcmin to southeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 3744 (= PGC 35857)
Discovered (Apr 11, 1882) by
Édouard Stephan
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Leo (RA 11 35 57.9, Dec +23 00 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3744 (Stephan list XII (12a #46), 1860 RA 11 28 39, NPD 66 13.0) is "extremely faint, small, round, a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 3745 (= PGC 36001, part of the Copeland Septet)
(part of
HCG 57 = NGC 3745, 3746, 3748, 3750, 3751, 3753 & 3754)
(part of Arp 320 = NGC 3745, 3746, 3748, 3750, 3753 & 3754, & PGC 36010)

Discovered (Apr 5, 1874) by Ralph Copeland
Also observed (1894?) by Hermann Kobold
Also observed (Apr 13, 1876) by Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
Also observed (Apr 13, 1876) by John Dreyer
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Leo (RA 11 37 44.4, Dec +22 01 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3745 (Copeland (using Lord Rosse's 72-inch Leviathan), 1860 RA 11 28 54, NPD 67 28.4) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round". The first IC notes that the NGC positions of all seven members of the Septet are wrong: "The RA's of these should be increased by 1m 32s, and the NPD diminished by 15.9 arcmin, as pointed out by Kobold in the A.N. 3241. In the Birr diagram the objects alpha and iota should be removed from the diagram (their places in the NGC are correct). The error was caused by my assuming two stars described on different nights as 'very red' and 'reddish' to be identical, which they are not (see A.N.3246)".
Discovery Note: Kobold does not give the date of his observation of the Copeland Septet, but his paper was published in April 1894, so the observation was probably made earlier that year. In Dreyer's comment on Kobold's paper, he notes that both he and Lord Rosse observed the group in 1876, whence the explanation about the error in the idenfication of the comparison stars.
Physical Information: Part of the Copeland Septet (= Hickson Compact Group 57), and of Arp 320, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin?

NGC 3746 (= PGC 35997, part of the Copeland Septet)
(part of
HCG 57 = NGC 3745, 3746, 3748, 3750, 3751, 3753 & 3754)
(part of Arp 320 = NGC 3745, 3746, 3748, 3750, 3753 & 3754, & PGC 36010)

Discovered (Feb 9, 1874) by Ralph Copeland
Also observed (1894?) by Hermann Kobold
Also observed (Apr 13, 1876) by Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
Also observed (Apr 13, 1876) by John Dreyer
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Leo (RA 11 37 43.6, Dec +22 00 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3746 (Copeland (using Lord Rosse's 72-inch Leviathan), 1860 RA 11 28 54, NPD 67 29.1) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round". Per the first IC note for NGC 3745, the RA should be increased by 1m 32s, and the NPD reduced by 15.9 arcmin.
Discovery Note: Kobold does not give the date of his observation of the Copeland Septet, but his paper was published in April 1894, so the observation was probably made earlier that year. In Dreyer's comment on Kobold's paper, he notes that both he and Lord Rosse observed the group in 1876, whence the explanation about the error in the idenfication of the comparison stars.
Physical Information: Part of the Copeland Septet (= Hickson Compact Group 57), and of Arp 320, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 3747 (= PGC 90149)
Discovered (Apr 2, 1801) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Draco (RA 11 32 31.0, Dec +74 22 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3747 (= GC 2458 = WH III 969, 1860 RA 11 28 57, NPD 14 14.8) is "extremely faint, small, place doubtful".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin? (Steinicke suggests perhaps a double system, but cursory glance at images says not.)
\
NGC 3748 (= PGC 36007, part of the Copeland Septet)
(part of
HCG 57 = NGC 3745, 3746, 3748, 3750, 3751, 3753 & 3754)
(part of Arp 320 = NGC 3745, 3746, 3748, 3750, 3753 & 3754, & PGC 36010)

Discovered (Apr 5, 1874) by Ralph Copeland
Also observed (1894?) by Hermann Kobold
Also observed (Apr 13, 1876) by Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
Also observed (Apr 13, 1876) by John Dreyer
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Leo (RA 11 37 49.1, Dec +22 01 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3748 (Copeland (using Lord Rosse's 72-inch Leviathan), 1860 RA 11 28 58, NPD 67 28.1) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round". Per the first IC note for NGC 3745, the RA should be increased by 1m 32s, and the NPD reduced by 15.9 arcmin.
Discovery Note: Kobold does not give the date of his observation of the Copeland Septet, but his paper was published in April 1894, so the observation was probably made earlier that year. In Dreyer's comment on Kobold's paper, he notes that both he and Lord Rosse observed the group in 1876, whence the explanation about the error in the idenfication of the comparison stars.
Physical Information: Part of the Copeland Septet (= Hickson Compact Group 57), and of Arp 320, used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Apparent size 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin?

PGC 36010
(part of
Arp 320 = NGC 3745, 3746, 3748, 3750, 3753 & 3754, & PGC 36010)
Not an NGC object but listed here as part of Arp 320
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Leo (RA 11 37 50.5, Dec +22 00 46)
Physical Information: Used by the Arp Atlas as an example of a group of galaxies. Apparent size ? arcmin.

NGC 3749 (= PGC 35861)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Centaurus (RA 11 35 53.3, Dec -37 59 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3749 (= GC 2459 = JH 3351, 1860 RA 11 28 59, NPD 127 12.8) is "faint, considerably small, a little extended, gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.2 by 1.2 arcmin?
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 3749
Above, a 5 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 3749
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 3742
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 3749, also showing spiral galaxy NGC 3742
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 3650 - 3699) ←NGC Objects: NGC 3700 - 3749→ (NGC 3750 - 3799)