Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4800 - 4849) ←NGC Objects: NGC 4850 - 4899 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (NGC 4900 - 4949)
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4850, 4851, 4852, 4853, 4854, 4855, 4856, 4857, 4858, 4859, 4860, 4861, 4862, 4863, 4864, 4865, 4866,
4867, 4868, 4869, 4870, 4871, 4872, 4873, 4874, 4875, 4876, 4877, 4878, 4879, 4880, 4881, 4882, 4883,
4884, 4885, 4886, 4887, 4888, 4889, 4890, 4891, 4892, 4893, 4894, 4895, 4896, 4897, 4898, 4899

Page last updated Sep 6, 2021
Made some minor changes to some de Vaucouleurs entries, started work on Arp 266
Checked Corwin's 'final' positions (many iffy IDs, but positions entered)
NEXT: Check Steinicke designations, magnitudes, types (later, compare to Corwin, NED, LEDA, Gottlieb)
NEXT: Clarify designations for all parts of Arp 266 (what is right, and what is wrong)
Prior last update May 6, 2021
Checked latest Steinicke databases, NGC/IC discoverers, Dreyer NGC/notes/IC1/IC2/1912 entries
Included extensive notes by Gottlieb, some for inclusion, some for my own reference.
Checked updated Corwin positions; need to resolve question about 4895/96
Checked cross-indices using LEDA/NED/SIMBAD; need to resolve 4861
CHECKING: missing observation dates, + discovery rights from 4865+
WORKING nightmarish region near 4866ff: Dreyer NGC, Corwin/Gottlieb notes, various cross-indices
Several objects have new/multiple identifications; need to consider and verify/reject
WORKING 4850+: Add/change pix/format to current style (replace DSS w/PanSTARRS where can, e.g. 4890)

NGC 4850
(= PGC 44449 = CGCG 160-063 = MCG +05-31-040)

Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0(rs)a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 21.8, Dec +27 58 04)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4850 (= GC 5688, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 51 29, NPD 61 16.3) is "faint, small, round." The position precesses to RA 12 58 15.4, Dec +27 58 16, about 1.4 arcmin west-northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6020 km/sec, NGC 4850 is about 280 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.65 by 0.6 arcmin, it is about 55 thousand light-years across. NGC 4850 is part of galaxy cluster Abell 1656.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4850
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4850
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4850

Corwin treats NGC 4851 as only PGC 44439, and PGC 83717 as a companion
Check his reasoning and compare to Steinicke and Gottlieb comments
NGC 4851
(= CGCG 160-061 (= PGC 44439 + PGC 83717), but not
)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (May 12, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
One or two galaxies in Coma Berenices
Definitely PGC 44439 = A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0(rs)a?) at RA 12 58 21.7, Dec +28 08 56
And Possibly PGC 83717 = A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) at RA 12 58 22.2, Dec +28 09 08
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4851 (= GC 5689, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 51 33, NPD 61 05.3) is "faint, very small, mottled but not resolved." The position precesses to RA 12 58 19.1, Dec +28 09 16, less than 0.7 arcmin more or less northwest of the pair of galaxies listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification as one or both of those galaxies is certain. What d'Arrest and Bigourdan observed was undoubtedly the pair, looking like a single "resolved" object to d'Arrest, and perhaps "a very small cluster" to Bigourdan; but despite that some catalogues list only the southern (brighter) galaxy as NGC 4851, and the northern one as an apparent companion (and it is only an apparent companion, as the two galaxies have very different distances, but that doesn't change their status as both comprising NGC 4851.
Multiple Misidenfications by LEDA: Unlike most other references that mistakenly list only the southwestern galaxy as NGC 4851, LEDA mistakenly lists only the northeastern galaxy as NGC 4851 (and as PGC 44439), mistakenly lists the southwestern one as PGC 83717, and worse yet, also identifies the northeastern galaxy as IC 839, which is absolutely wrong, as that galaxy lies 2 arcmin to the southwest (hence the warning in the title for this entry).
Discovery Note: Using considerably larger telescopes, Gottlieb could found the pair of galaxies difficult to resolve, but could sometimes see that the southwestern component is brighter than the northeastern, as is easily seen in photographic images. Corwin lists only PGC 44439 as NGC 4851, and PGC 83717 as merely a companion.
Physical Information for NGC 4851sw = PGC 44439: The brighter component of NGC 4851.
Physical Information for NGC 4851ne = PGC 83717: The fainter component of NGC 4851.
SDSS image of region near the pair of lenticular galaxies that comprise NGC 4851; also shown are NGC 4848, IC 839 and IC 3943
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 4851, also showing NGC 4848, IC 839 and IC 3943
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the optical double, showing the correct PGC IDs
SDSS image of the pair of lenticular galaxies, PGC 44439 and PGC 83717, which comprise NGC 4851, showing the correct PGC designations

NGC 4852
(= OCL 894 = ESO 131-SC017 = "PGC 3518305")

Discovered (Apr 30, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Mar 31, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.9 open cluster (type II2p) in Centaurus (RA 13 00 11.0, Dec -59 36 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4852 (= GC 3335 = JH 3449, Dunlop #311, 1860 RA 12 51 45, NPD 148 50.6) is "a cluster, large, pretty rich, irregularly round, 10th magnitude stars." The position precesses to RA 13 00 11.2, Dec -59 35 59, well within the widely scattered cluster of stars, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Note: Gottlieb states that this is an impressive collection of about 150 stars scattered across a 10 arcmin wide region. Herschel estimated that there were 80 to 100 stars scattered over a region spanning a similar region. With his much smaller (9-inch) telescope Dunlop saw fewer stars scattered over a region only about 6 to 8 arcmin across, but could easily see that the "very faint pretty large nebula... [was] resolvable into very minute stars."
Physical Information: Apparent size 12 arcmin.
DSS image of region near open cluster NGC 4852
Above, a 20 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4852

NGC 4853
(= PGC 44481 = UGC 8092 = CGCG 160-068 = MCG +05-31-048)

Discovered (Apr 13, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SA0(r)a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 35.2, Dec +27 35 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4853 (= GC 3336 = JH 1496, 1860 RA 12 51 49, NPD 61 38.4) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly a little brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 12 58 35.6, Dec +27 36 11, less than 0.4 arcmin north-northeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4853, also showing NGC 4854
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4853, also showing NGC 4854
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4853

NGC 4854
(= PGC 44502 = CGCG 160-070 = MCG +05-31-049)

Discovered (Apr 24, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type SA0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 47.4, Dec +27 40 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4854 (= GC 5690, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 51 55, NPD 61 34.0) is "very faint, pretty large, cometic." The position precesses to RA 12 58 41.5, Dec +27 40 35, about 1.3 arcmin nearly due west of the galaxy listed above, the description is reasonable and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4854, also showing NGC 4854, IC 3957 and IC 3963
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4854, also showing NGC 4853, IC 3957 & 3963)
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4854

NGC 4855
(= PGC 44572 = MCG -02-33-077)

Discovered (Apr 19, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(s)ab pec?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 18.5, Dec -13 13 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4855 (Tempel list V (#26), 1860 RA 12 51 58, NPD 102 28.4) is "faint, small, star involved." The position precesses to RA 12 59 18.6, Dec -13 13 48, nearly dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits (though the star is so faint it's hard to see in modern photographs) and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 1.5 arcmin. A starburst or Seyfert galaxy?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4855
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4855
Below, a 4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4855

NGC 4856
(= PGC 44582 = UGCA 313 = MCG -02-33-078)

Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 8, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.5 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(s)a?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 21.2, Dec -15 02 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4856 (= GC 3337 = JH 1497 = WH I 68, 1860 RA 12 52 00, NPD 104 17.0) is "bright, round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle, 13th magnitude star to northwest." The position precesses to RA 12 59 22.1, Dec -15 02 24, well within the norhteastern portion of the central part of the galaxy listed above, the description fits (the star is to the southeast, but JH's original observation stated that, so "northwest" in the GC must have been a typo), and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.7 by 1.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4856
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4856
Below, a 4.4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4855

NGC 4857
(= PGC 44284 = UGC 8077 = CGCG 335-029 = MCG +12-12-022)

Discovered (Apr 7, 1793) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)b?) in Draco (RA 12 57 18.4, Dec +70 12 13)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4857 (= GC 3339 = WH III 908, 1860 RA 12 52 02, NPD 19 01.5) is "extremely faint, very small, irregularly round, very little brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 12 57 07.0, Dec +70 13 03, less than 1.3 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4857
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4857
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4857

NGC 4858
(= PGC 44535 = CGCG 160-213 = MCG +05-31-051)

Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 02.1, Dec +28 06 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4858 (= GC 5691, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 14, NPD 61 07.2) is "faint, very small, preceding (western) of double nebula," the other being NGC 4860. The position precesses to RA 12 58 59.9, Dec +28 07 24, less than 0.7 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby other than the aforementioned NGC 4860, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Note: Per Gottlieb, this is among the faintest objects discovered by d'Arrest, and as difficult as it is to see even with much larger instruments, it and similar discoveries by d'Arrest are a powerful testament to his exceptional ability.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin. A starburst galaxy. Although it appears to be close to NGC 4860, it is about 70 million light-years more distant, so they are completely unrelated.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4858, also showing NGC 4860, NGC 4865 and IC 3943
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4858, showing NGC 4860 and 4865, and IC 3943
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4858
Below, a 0.35 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 4858

NGC 4859
(= PGC 44534 = UGC 8097 = CGCG 160-071 = MCG +05-31-053)

Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0(r)a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 01.8, Dec +26 48 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4859 (= GC 5692, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 15, NPD 62 25.7) is "faint, very small, round." The position precesses to RA 12 59 02.2, Dec +26 48 54, well within the eastern half of the galaxy listed above, the description is a good fit for a visual observation and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 0.75 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4859
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4859
Below, a 2.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4859

NGC 4860 (= PGC 44539 = CGCG 160-215 = MCG +05-31-054)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (1895) by Hermann Kobold
A magnitude 13.5 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 03.9, Dec +28 07 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4860 (= GC 5693, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 17, NPD 61 06.8) is "pretty faint, small, round, following (eastern) of double nebula," the other being NGC 4858. The position precesses to RA 12 59 02.8, Dec +28 07 48, about 0.4 arcmin northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby other than the aforementioned NGC 4858, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Note: Among Gottlieb's detailed description of his own and historical observations, he mentions that Hermann Kobold "also measured an accurate position in 1895", hence my decision to add Kobold's name to the list of observers.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.65 arcmin.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4860, also showing NGC 4858
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4860, also showing NGC 4858 (which see)

NEED CONSIDERABLE WORK HERE
Corwin equates N4861 and I3961, while other references assign I3961 only to the bright knot at the southern end
Also, numerous PGC and other designations conflict with each other
NGC 4861
(with
IC 3961 = Arp 266)
(PGC 44536 = PGC 44532 = MCG +06-29-003)

The designations above refer to the entire galaxy
(= CGCG 189-005 = UGC 8098 (= PGC 44536 (= PGC 44532) + PGC 93120))
But (per Gottlieb) CGCG and UGC misidentify the galaxy as IC 3961 and the H II region as NGC 4861,
while LEDA assigns PGC 93120 to only the H II region
Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4861)
Also observed (Apr 27, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4861)
Also observed (Apr 17, 1855) by R. J. Mitchell (while listed as WH IV 30 and JH 1499)
Also observed (Mar 21, 1903) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 3961)
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 02.0, Dec +34 51 38)
Corwin lists the position of the HII "knot" as RA 12 59 00.4, Dec +34 50 44
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4861 (= GC 3340 = JH 1499 = WH IV 30, 1860 RA 12 52 23, NPD 54 23.0) is "very faint, pretty large, very much extended 30°±, between 2 stars." The position precesses to RA 12 59 01.5, Dec +34 51 36, barely southwest of the center of the galaxy listed above and well within its outline, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification as NGC 4861 is certain, even though the assignment of several other designations is an appalling mess.
Discovery Note: Although Herschel's position wasn't bad, it was off just enough that Wolf (and Dreyer) thought Wolf's more accurate measurement might be another object, hence the duplicate designation (see IC 3961 about that). However, the 'mistake' has led to the occasional misidentification (noted above) that IC 3961 is the main galaxy, and NGC 4861 is the HII region on its southwestern end. Per Corwin, WH's and Wolf's notes make it clear that both designations refer to the galaxy and the HII region.
Discovery Note 2: Gottlieb notes that compact (elliptical) galaxy PGC 101479 is exactly in line with the major axis of NGC 4861, "3.5' NNE of the mag 12 star, and it is possible that it is a companion of NGC 4861, so it is discussed in the following entry.
Discovery Note 3: In discussing the historical record, Gottlieb notes that WH treated the HII knot as a star defining one end of the nebula, while JH noticed that the southern "star" was ill-defined and seemed to belong to the nebula, suggesting that it might be non-stellar. In addition, Gottlieb notes that Mitchell (using the 3rd Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope) felt that the southern star "looks more like a bright little knot involved in the south end," hence my addition of Mitchell to the list of observers.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.8 by 1.5 arcmin. 3K Vr 1079 km/sec. A starburst galaxy. Both Gottlieb and Corwin note that the HII region is one of the very few extragalactic HII regions that are affected by OIII filtration, indicating a considerable presence of doubly ionized oxygen in the region.
Use By The Arp Atlas: NGC 4861 is used (with IC 3961) by The Arp Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as an example of a galaxy with irregular clumps, with the note "Resolution into knots, bright knot at S end," the "bright knot at S end" being listed as IC 3961.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4861, also known as Arp 266
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4861
Below, a 4.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4861, also known as Arp 266
Below, a 0.45 by 0.6 arcmin wide image of the southern part of the galaxy (Image Credit Hubble Legacy Archive)
'Raw' HST image of southern part of spiral galaxy NGC 4861, also known as Arp 266

PGC 101479
Not an NGC object but listed here as a probable companion of
NGC 4861
A magnitude 16.3(?) elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 13.3, Dec +35 56 11)
Physical Information: LEDA E2, U 17.4, B 16.6, I 15.7 -> V 16 to 16.5(?), 0.36 by 0.29 arcmin, 3K Vr 1172 km/sec; NED 0.43 by 0.32 arcmin, 16.5g, 3K Vr 1163 km/sec

NGC 4862
(= PGC 44610 = MCG -02-33-079, and "perhaps" =
IC 3999)
Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by Francis Leavenworth (and later listed as NGC 4862)
Also observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe (while already listed as NGC 4862)
Perhaps observed (Apr 16, 1895) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as IC 3999)
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)c?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 30.8, Dec -14 07 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4862 (Leavenworth list I (#194), 1860 RA 12 52 25, NPD 103 22.2) is "extremely faint, small, round." The second IC adds (per Howe) "RA is 12 52 09, another suspected about 5 arcmin south of this one." The corrected position precesses to RA 12 59 30.3, Dec -14 07 36, on the northern rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain (in fact, Corwin states that Leavenworth's sketch of the region confirms the identification). The possible duplication involving IC 3999 is very iffy, and in any event does not affect the identification of NGC 4862, so see the IC entry for anything else about its identification (or lack thereof).
Discovery Note: Per Gottlieb, there is nothing 5 arcmin south "of this one," but NGC 4863 is 5 arcmin to the north (and slightly to the east) and Corwin states that Leavenworth's sketch of the region also confirms its identification, so Howe probably observed that galaxy and accidentally reversed the position.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 0.7 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4862, also showing part of NGC 4863
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4862, also showing part of NGC 4863
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 4862
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4862

NGC 4863
(= PGC 44650 = MCG -02-33-081)

Discovered (Feb 26, 1886) by
Francis Leavenworth
Also observed (Jul 1899 to Jun 1900) by Herbert Howe (while already listed as NGC 4863)
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0(rs)a?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 42.5, Dec -14 01 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4863 (Leavenworth list I (#195), 1860 RA 12 52 25, NPD 103 17.2) is "extremely faint, small, much extended 45°, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus." The position precesses to RA 12 59 46.3, Dec -14 02 35, about 1.2 arcmin southeast of the galaxy listed above, the description fits (though the position angle is more like 25¯) and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain (in fact, Corwin states that Leavenworth's sketch confirms the identification).
Discovery Note: As noted by Gottlieb in the entry for NGC 4862, Howe "suspected" a nebula 5 arcmin south of that object, but apparently reversed the direction, and actually observed NGC 4863, whih is roughly 5 arcmin north of NGC 4862, hence my addition of his name to the list of observers of NGC 4863 (since Dreyer had added Howe's observation to the IC2 entry for NGC 4862, that justifies placing his note about the "suspected" nebula in its correct place).
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.75 by 0.25 arcmin.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4863, also showing part of NGC 4862
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 4863, also showing part of NGC 4862
Above, a 2.0 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 4863
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4863

The realm of a cataloger's nightmare
 The region surrounding NGC 4874 and NGC 4889 contains dozens of "satellite" galaxies too numerous and too faint for the visual observers of the 1800's to properly observe and record, and as a result, many of the fainter galaxies that received NGC or IC designations cannot be certainly identified. This note is a warning that the arguments for and against various identifications may not only be complicated but also unconvincing even to those making the arguments.

NGC 4864
(= PGC 44566 = CGCG 160-221 = MCG +05-31-058)

Probably discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Apr 13, 1831) by John Herschel
Also observed (May 10, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 13.3, Dec +27 58 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4864 (= GC 3343 = JH 1500 (? = WH II 388), d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 27, NPD 61 16.0) is "faint, small, preceding (western) of 2", the other being NGC 4867. The position precesses to RA 12 59 12.9, Dec +27 58 37, almost dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and other than the aforementioned NGC 4867 there is nothing else nearby, so the ientification is certain.
Discovery Notes: William Herschel's II 388 is probably (though not certainly) NGC 4864, hence his addition to the list of its observers. He recorded "Two, the time taken between them", and his position is 2.5 arcmin northwest of NGC 4874, which is certainly one of the two. In the GC, John Herschel assigned II 388 to NGC 4869 and Dreyer copied that into the NGC, but per Corwin, NGC 4864 is a better match in position to WH II 388, because NGC 4869 is 5 arcmin south of where a second object observed in the same sweep "should" be, and the superimposed star probably made it easier to see than NGC 4869, hence the addition of II 388 to this entry (but with a question mark, since Steinicke still lists II 388 as NGC 4869). Later, JH independently discovered JH 1500. His position wasn't very good, but a copy of his sketch provided by Steinicke proves that JH 1500 must be NGC 4864. Given these complications, the very precise position used by Dreyer for the NGC entry was taken from d'Arrest's observations.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.45 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4864, also showing NGC 4867, NGC 4869, NGC 4871, NGC 4872, NGC 4873, NGC 4874, NGC 4875, IC 3955 and IC 3973
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4864
Also shown are NGC 4867, 4869, 4871, 4872, 4873, 4874 and 4875, and IC 3955 and 3973
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4864
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4864

NGC 4865
(= PGC 44578 = UGC 8100 = CGCG 160-224 = MCG +05-31-064)

Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (1895) by Hermann Kobold
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 19.9, Dec +28 05 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4865 (= GC 5694, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 29, NPD 61 09.5) is "very faint, very small, 7th or 8th magnitude star 13 seconds of time to east." The position precesses to RA 12 59 14.8, Dec +28 05 07, about 1.1 arcmin west of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the only other nearby object (PGC 44560, about 0.6 arcmin to the south-southwest) is much fainter, and an unlikely candidate for what d'Arrest observed. In addition, the magnitude 7 star HD 112887 is exactly 13 seconds of time to the east of PGC 44578, but 19 seconds of time to the east of PGC 44560; so both the faintness and position of PGC 44560 rule it out, and the identification of NGC 4865 as PGC 44578 must be considered certain.
Discovery Notes: This is #282 in d'Arrest's list from A. N. 1537. (1865AN65-1537-1_D'Arrest.pdf). Per Gottlieb, Kobold measured an accurate position in 1895, but didn't publish it until 1907.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.35 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4865, also showing NGC 4858, NGC 4860, part of NGC 4873, and IC 3955
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4865, also showing PGC 44560
Also shown are NGC 4858, 4860 and 4873, and IC 3955
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4865

PGC 44560
(not =
NGC 4865)
(= PGC 44575 = CGCG 160-223 = MCG +05-31-063)

Not an NGC object but listed here to emphasize the identification of NGC 4865 as PGC 44578

NGC 4866
(= PGC 44600 = UGC 8102 = CGCG 071-092 = MCG +02-33-045)

Discovered (Jan 14, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 1, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 lenticular galaxy (type SA0(r)a?) in Virgo (RA 12 59 27.1, Dec +14 10 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4866 (= GC 3342 = JH 1498 = WH I 162, 1860 RA 12 52 29, NPD 75 04.4) is "bright, pretty large, much extended 90°, suddenly brighter middle and nucleus, small (faint) star involved." The position precesses to
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.8 by 0.95 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4866
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4866
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 4866
Below, a 3.3 by 1.4 arcmin wide image of the central portion of the galaxy (North is on the right)
(Image Credit NASA/ESA/HST, Acknowledgement: Gilles Chapdelaine)
HST image of part of lenticular galaxy NGC 4866

NGC 4867
(= PGC 44568 = CGCG 160-222 = MCG +05-31-062)

Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (Apr 28, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (1895) by Hermann Kobold
A magnitude 14.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 15.2, Dec +27 58 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4867 (d'Arrest, Bigourdan (#62?), 1860 RA 12 52 32, NPD 61 15) is "very faint, very small, stellar, following (to east of) h 1500,", (JH) 1500 being NGC 4864.
Discovery Note: Gottlieb notes that Bigourdan's position is too far north, placing NGC 4867 northeast of NGC 4864, instead of southeast, but that as in the case of NGC 4865, Kobold measured an accurate position in 1895, and published it in 1907. QUERY: Gottlieb's notes for both 4867 and 4871 equate d'Arrest's discoveries with Bigourdan 62, but with different dates for Bigourdan's observation(s); need to find out if there is an error here and where/what it is.
Discovery Note 2: Per Gottlieb, Corwin suggests that WH was the original discoverer of NGC 4864/4867. NEED TO CHECK THAT, AND WHAT STEINICKE THINKS OF THE IDEA, AS HE HAS DONE EXHAUSTIVE WORK ON WH'S OBSERVATIONS.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4864
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4867; for a wider view, see NGC 4864

NGC 4868
(= PGC 44557 = UGC 8099 = CGCG 189-008 = MCG +06-29-004)

Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
Perhaps also observed (Apr 1, 1878) by John Dreyer or Lawrence Parsons
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 08.9, Dec +37 18 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4868 (= GC 3341 = WH II 644, 1860 RA 12 52 36, NPD 51 56.5) is "pretty bright, small, round, much brighter middle." (Per Gottlieb, CH's position is 9 sec of RA too far west)
Discovery Note: An examination of the observations of NGC 4914 by the 4th Lord Rosse on Apr 24, 1865, in an effort to find out what was later listed as NGC 4912, 4913 and 4916 (all of which are otherwise lost) shows observations of NGC 4914 and its environs on three dates. The observations of Apr 1, 1878 certainly include NGC 4893 and 4870, and almost certainly 4868, but though Dreyer credits Lord Rosse with one of the first two and himself with the other, he fails to which of them observed 4868, and does not mention the observation in the NGC at all; so although the third nebula that they observed to the west of 4914 must have been 4868 (though the description of the star field isn't entirely accurate, there can be no doubt that it was 4868), which of them actually observed it (or whether both did, as is most likely) may never be known.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.45 by 1.3 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4868
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4868
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4868

NGC 4869
(= PGC 44587 = CGCG 160-225 = MCG +05-31-065)

Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 26, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (May 10, 1863)by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 23.4, Dec +27 54 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4869 (= GC 3344 = JH 1501 = WH II 388, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 37, NPD 61 19.8) is "considerably faint, small, round, 7th magnitude star to north."
Discovery Note: Gottlieb states JH's observatio as Apr 13, 1831; states that though NPD is rough, sketch mailed by Steinicke verifies JH 1501=PGC 44587. Gottlieb states JH wrote "The second of 5, south of 7th mag star", and suggests the first observation probably refers to NGC 4874. d'Arrest also suggested that WH II 388 was probably NGC 4864, not 4869 (as noted at entry for 4867, Corwin suspects WH's observation was for 4864 and 4867).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4869
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4869
Below, a labeled version of the same image, also showing NGC 4864, 4867,
4871, 4872, 4873, 4874, 4875 and 4876, IC 3949, 3955, 3960, 3973, 3976 and 3998
Labeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4869, also showing NGC 4864, NGC 4867, NGC 4869, NGC 4871, NGC 4872, NGC 4873, NGC 4874, NGC 4875, NGC 4876, IC 3949, IC 3955, IC 3960, IC 3973, IC 3976 and IC 3998
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4869

NGC 4870
(= PGC 44569 = PGC 2091983)

Discovered (Apr 1, 1878) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 17.8, Dec +37 02 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4870 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 12 52 40, NPD 52 15) is "pretty faint, a little extended, between 2 stars."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.25 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4870
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4870
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4870

WORKING HERE: add pix, fit to new format (check d'Arrest's entries for objects in this region: 1865AN65-1537-1_D'Arrest.pdf)

NGC 4871
(= PGC 44606 = CGCG 160-227 = MCG +05-31-066)

Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (May 16, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 30.0, Dec +27 57 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4871 (d'Arrest, Bigourdan, 1860 RA 12 52 45, NPD 61 17.0) is "very faint, very small, stellar nucleus."
QUERY: Gottlieb's notes for both 4867 and 4871 equate d'Arrest's discoveries with Bigourdan 62, but with different dates for Bigourdan's observation(s); need to find out if there is an error here and where/what it is. Gottlieb also states that it appears that this is the same as Nova Kobold 8.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4871
Above, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4871; for a wider view, see NGC 4874

REFER TO CORWIN'S NOTES

NGC 4872
(= PGC 44624 = CGCG 160-230 = MCG +05-31-068)

Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Indpendently discovered (1895) by Hermann Kobold
Not discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (actually NGC 4874)
Not observed (Apr 13, 1831) by John Herschel (actually NGC 4874)
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 34.1, Dec +27 56 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4872 (= GC 3347 = JH 1502 = WH II 389, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 49, NPD 61 17.0) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round."
Discovery Notes: The identification of this object is based on d'Arrest's observation, as the Herschels' positions were too crude to state which of the numerous objects in this region corresponded to their observations. There is little doubt that GC 3347 = JH 1502 = WH II 389 is actually the much brighter NGC 4874, meaning that d'Arrest is the discoverer of NGC 4872, not one of the Herschels. This does not alter the identification of NGC 4872 or NGC 4874, as the order of entries in the NGC was based on the positions of the objects, but does create confusion about who discovered which objects. However, Steinicke's database reverses the information shown here for NGC 4872 and 4874, so he has not been convinced of that.
Gottlieb Notes: Gottlieb states d'Arrest observed ths on Apr 21, 1865, while observing NGC 4874: "he mentioned finding another nebula 45" to the south and preceding, which matches the offset to... PGC 44624. On 5 May 1864 he recorded an object 3 sec of RA following NGC 4874 and 0.3' north but there is nothing at this offset, although Dreyer may have assumed this referred to NGC 4872." Gottlieb continues "Dreyer equated WH II-389 and JH 1502 with NGC 4872, but these... designations apply to much brighter NGC 4874. Herman Kobold independently dscovered NGC 4872 in 1895 while measuring positions in the (Coma) cluster... He labled it Kobold 9."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4872
Above, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4872; for a wider view, see NGC 4874

NGC 4873
(= PGC 44621 = CGCG 160-229 = MCG +05-31-069)

Discovered (May 10, 1863) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (May 16, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 32.8, Dec +27 59 01)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4873 (d'Arrest, Bigourdan (#64?), 1860 RA 12 52 49, NPD 61 15.5) is "very faint, very small."
Gottlieb Note: States d'Arrest's observation is same as Big 64, and that both positions match PGC 44621.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.6? arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4873
Above, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 4873; for a wider view, see NGC 4874

NGC 4874
(= PGC 44628 = UGC 8103 = CGCG 160-231 = MCG +05-31-070)

SEE CORWIN NOTES Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel (mistaken by Dreyer for NGC 4872)
Also observed (Apr 13, 1831) byJohn Herschel (mistaken by Dreyer for NGC 4872)
Discovered (May 5, 1884) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 11.7 elliptical galaxy (type E0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 35.7, Dec +27 57 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4874 (= GC 5695, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 52 53, NPD 61 17.1) is "faint, h 1501 and 1502 preceding (to the west)," h1501 and 1502 being NGC 4869 and 4872, respectively. (Some confusion has recently arisen about the identification of this object, so the following note is meant to reassure readers that there is no doubt about the identification shown here, and its long usage in the astronomical literature is secure. The final version of this entry will be less technical, but equally insistent on the accuracy of the identification.) [This is #159 in d'Arrest's paper (1865AN63-1500-177), which states "Faint. Near h. 1502, 1503." That was changed to "Near h1501, 1502" by JH in his entry for GC 5695. Dreyer changed that to "h1501 and 1502 preceding", meaning that using d'Arrest's positions for those objects, the position of NGC 4874 was to the east of the other entries. d'Arrest's 1861 position precesses to RA 12 59 38.9, Dec +27 57 34, within the eastern outline of the galaxy listed above, and given Dreyer's specification of the relative positions of the GC/NGC objects, the identification of NGC 4874 with giant elliptical PGC 44628 is absolutely certain.]
Discovery Notes: As in the case of NGC 4872, the identification of this object is based on d'Arrest's observation, as the Herschels' positions were too crude to state which of the numerous objects in this region corresponded to their observations. There is little doubt that GC 3347 = JH 1502 = WH II 389, which Dreyer assigned to NGC 4872, is actually the much brighter NGC 4874, meaning that d'Arrest is the discoverer of NGC 4872, not one of the Herschels, and William Herschel is the discoverer of NGC 4874, not d'Arrest. This does not alter the identification of NGC 4872 or NGC 4874, as the order of entries in the NGC was based on the positions of the objects, but does create confusion about who discovered which objects. However, Steinicke's database reverses the information shown here for NGC 4872 and 4874, so he has not been convinced of that.
Gottlieb Notes: "Dreyer misassigned WH II 389 = JH 1502 to nearby NGC 4872, but this is a much fainter companion that was discovered by Heinrich d'Arrest. JH siply oted 'The thrd of 5; place by configuration, but he associatd it with II 389 and his sketch cofirms JH 1502 - NGC 4874. Also, his fist two observatios under JH 1501... probably apply to NGC 4874. Heirich d'Arrest made 7 observatios of this galaxy and qquestioned if it was H II 389(?). Dreyer credited d'Arrest with the discovery in the NGC."
 "Heinrich d'Arrest discovered 34 galaxies in the Coma cluster... and Steinicke mentions that he was the first to recogize the Coma assemblage of galaxies as a cluster... although Max Wolf is genrally given credit in the literature based on his photograph in 1901... and following announcement 'An extraordinary cluster of nebuae' (AN 155, 127)." (Per Wolf) "I have determined thre are at least 108 nebulae in a circle of 30' diameter." In 1918 Heber Curtis wrote "there are more than 300 small nebulae in an ara about 50' x 40'."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.9? arcmin.
Use By The de Vauouleurs Atlas: NGC 4874 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type E+0 (gE).
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4874, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 4871, 4872 and 4873
Above, a 3.6 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4874, also showing NGC 4871, 4872 and 4873
Below, an unlabeled 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, showing numerous other galaxies
Unlabeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4874, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Below, the same view, but showing labels for NGC 4864, 4867, 4869,
4871, 4872, 4873, 4874, 4875, 4876 and 4883, and for IC 3973 and 3998
Labeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4874, also showing elliptical galaxies NGC 4864, 4867, 4869 and 4876, lenticular galaxies NGC 4871, 4872, 4873, 4875 and 4883, and lenticular galaxies IC 3973 and 3998

NGC 4875
(= PGC 44640 = CGCG 160-232)

Discovered (May 16, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 37.9, Dec +27 54 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4875 (Bigourdan (list II #65), 1860 RA 12 52 53, NPD 61 19) is "very faint, very small, stellar."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.3? arcmin. (For now, see wide-field image of NGC 4874.)

NGC 4876
(= PGC 44658 = CGCG 160-234 = MCG +05-31-073)

Discovered (May 16, 1885) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.4 elliptical galaxy (type E5??) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 44.4, Dec +27 54 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4876 (Bigourdan (list II #66), 1860 RA 12 53 02, NPD 61 19) is "very faint, very small, no nucleus."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.4? arcmin. (For now, see wide-field image of NGC 4874.)
*see HLA*

NGC 4877
(= PGC 44761 = MCG -02-33-086)

Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in Virgo (RA 13 00 26.3, Dec -15 17 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4877 (= GC 3338 = WH II 299, Tempel list V, 1860 RA 12 53 03, NPD 104 31.7) is "pretty bright, pretty large, much brighter middle."
Per Gottlieb, WH's position was 54 sec of RA to the east of this galaxy, but the description fits and there is nothing else nearby. Tempel's position was accurate, and used for the NGC.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.0? arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4877
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4877
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4877

NGC 4878
(= PGC 44747 = MCG -01-33-064)

Discovered (Mar 23, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 00 20.2, Dec -06 06 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4878 (= GC 3345 = WH III 758, 1860 RA 12 53 06, NPD 95 21.0) is "very faint, very small, preceding (western) of 2," the other being NGC 4879.
As noted at NGC 4879, there is little doubt that the galaxy listed here as NGC 4878 is an object that Herschel discovered in 1789, but whether it should be called NGC 4878 or 4879 is unknown. For the reasons discussed there, I have adopted the current uncertain consensus that PGC 44747 should be listed as NGC 4878, and what if anything NGC 4879 might be is probably the star east-southeast of the galaxy. Apparent size 1.5 by 1.45 arcmin (from the images below). Alternate ID: Corwin notes that if the star to the west of the galaxy is what Herschel saw (it is half a magnitude brighter than the one listed as NGC 4879, below), then NGC 4878 would be the magnitude 14.9 star at RA 13 00 14.5, Dec -06 07 09, and the galaxy listed here would be NGC 4879.
PanSTARRS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4878, also showing NGC 4888 and the star listed as NGC 4879, and the double star misidentified by LEDA as NGC 4879
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 4878, also showing NGC 4888
Also shown are PGC 44787 (which is not NGC 4879), and the star listed as NGC 4879
Below, a 2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of NGC 4878
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy adopted as NGC 4878

WORKING HERE, re alternate identifications

NGC 4879
(not =
NGC 4888)
Recorded (Mar 23, 1789) by William Herschel
A magnitude 15.5 star in Virgo (RA 13 00 25.6, Dec -06 06 40)
Per Dreyer, NGC 4879 (= GC 3346 = WH III 759, 1860 RA 12 53 08, NPD 95 20±) is "very faint, very small, following (eastern) of 2," the other being NGC 4878. The listed positions put NGC 4879 about an arcmin north (give or take a bit) of NGC 4878, and 2 seconds of time to its east. This difference in position was not listed by Herschel, who gave only a single position for the two "very faint, very small" nebulae he saw at the position. But there is only one galaxy in the area (the one listed as NGC 4878, above), so if Herschel did see two objects, the second should be one of the two faint stars near that galaxy. Per Corwin, that could be either the star preceding the galaxy (at RA 13 00 14.5, Dec -06 07 07), in which case it would be NGC 4878 and the galaxy would become NGC 4879; or it could be the star following the galaxy (at the position listed above), in which case NGC 4878 would remain the galaxy and the star would be NGC 4879. (Added Jul 21, 2021: Steinicke informs me that his recent reevaluation of Herschel's notes convinces him that the galaxy should be NGC 4878, and the following star NGC 4879, and that is what I have adopted here.) But since the galaxy has been identified as NGC 4878 for some time, even if the reverse were true, it would reduce any future confusion to keep NGC 4878 as the identity for the galaxy, regardless of how NGC 4879 is treated.
Misidentification By LEDA: The PGC (and therefore LEDA) lists NGC 4879 as PGC 44787, a double star to the west of NGC 4888. This is presumably due to the RNGC incorrectly listing NGC 4879 as a duplicate of NGC 4888, in which case a star near the latter galaxy could qualify as one of the two objects observed by Herschel. But since NGC 4879 is not NGC 4888, the identification of PGC 44787 as being in any way related to NGC 4879 is impossible. Still, because of that error, PGC 44787 is briefly discussed below, as a warning about the error.
PanSTARRS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4878, also showing NGC 4888 and the star listed as NGC 4879, and the double star misidentified by LEDA as NGC 4879
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 4878, also showing NGC 4888
Also shown are PGC 44787 (which is not NGC 4879), and the star listed as NGC 4879

PGC 44787 (not =
NGC 4879)
(= MCG -01-33-064A)

Not an NGC object but listed here because misidentified as NGC 4879 in LEDA
A magnitude 11.0 and 12.1 double star in Virgo (RA 13 00 32.5, Dec -06 04 24)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for NGC 4879, a modern misidentification of NGC 4879 as a duplicate of NGC 4888 led to the PGC assigning PGC 44787 to the double star near NGC 4888, and equating it to NGC 4879, presumably because William Herschel stated that he observed two objects, one becoming NGC 4878, and the other presumably being NGC 4879. But since NGC 4888 has absolutely nothing to do with NGC 4879, anything near NGC 4888 cannot have anything to do with NGC 4879, either. So the PGC entry, though it (more or less) correctly identifies the object as a star, is otherwise completely wrong.
PanSTARRS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 4878, also showing NGC 4888 and the star listed as NGC 4879, and the double star misidentified by LEDA as NGC 4879
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 4878, also showing NGC 4888
Also shown are PGC 44787 (which is not NGC 4879), and the star listed as NGC 4879

WORKING HERE: Checking transcription of Steinicke physical information

NGC 4880
(= PGC 44719 = UGC 8109 = CGCG 071-094 = MCG +02-33-047)

Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 4, 1829) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a) in Virgo (RA 13 00 10.6, Dec +12 29 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4880 (= GC 3348 = JH 1503 = WH III 83, 1860 RA 12 53 09, NPD 76 46.3) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 2.5 arcmin.

NGC 4881
(= PGC 44686 = UGC 8106 = CGCG 160-238 = MCG +05-31-075)

Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 57.7, Dec +28 14 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4881 (= GC 5696, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 11, NPD 60 59.9) is "faint, small, a little extended, 9th magnitude star to southwest."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 1.0 arcmin.
*see HLA*

NGC 4882 (=
NGC 4886)
(= PGC 44698 = CGCG 160-239 = MCG +05-31-076)

Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4886)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4882)
A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 04.4, Dec +27 59 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4882 (= GC 5697, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 12, NPD 61 16.0) is "very faint, small, others near." (The last comment being an understatement!)
Per Gottlieb, d'Arrest found 4882 and 4884 on Apr 22, with relative positions that exactly match those of 4886 (discovered by d'Arrest a year earlier) and 4889 (discoverd by WH). But the 1865 RA was 7 seconds too small for both galaxies, so 4882 = 4886 and 4884 = 4889. He also notes that the RNGC placed 4882 0.2 min of RA west of NGC 4886, but there is nothing there; the error has long been recognized, but since the RNGC is still sometimes used as a reference, the warning is still appropriate.
Physical Information: (this entry will probably contain only historical information; for anything else see NGC 4886)

NGC 4883
(= PGC 44682 = CGCG 160-237)

Supposedly discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
nox 261 Also observed (May 16, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 59 56.0, Dec +28 02 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4883, (d'Arrest, Bigourdan (#67), 1860 RA 12 53 13, NPD 61 12) is "very faint, small, stellar."
Per Gottlieb, though both Dreyer and Steinicke credit d'Arrest as shown above, Steve can't find his observation in Siderum Nebulosorum (so I will have to check that out before finalizing this entry). (1861) 12 53 13.3, Dec +28 47 07
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmin. (For now, see wide-field image of NGC 4874.)
*see HLA*

NGC 4884 (=
NGC 4889)
(= PGC 44715 = UGC 8110 = CGCG 160-241 = MCG +05-31-077)

Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4889)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4884)
Not found by Max Wolf (while listed as NGC 4884)
A magnitude 11.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 08.1, Dec +27 58 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4884 (= GC 5698, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 15, NPD 61 16.3) is the "Chief one of multiple nebulae." The second IC adds "Not on Heidelberg plate (W. (= Wolf) III)". (this entry will probably only contain historical information; for anything else see NGC 4889)
Per Gottlieb, 4482 and 4884 are a mistaken observation of 4486 and 4489 (as described in more detail in the entry for 4882).

NGC 4885
(= PGC 44781 = MCG -01-33-065)

Discovered (Feb 19, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sa? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 00 33.9, Dec -06 51 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4885 (= GC 3349 = JH 1504, 1860 RA 12 53 17, NPD 96 05.8) is "very faint, small, extended."
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4885
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4885
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4885

NGC 4886 (=
NGC 4882)
(= PGC 44698 = CGCG 160-239 = MCG +05-31-076)

Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4886)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4882)
A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 04.4, Dec +27 59 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4886 (= GC 5699, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 18, NPD 61 15.9) is "faint, small, round, II 391 four seconds of time to east," WH II 391 being NGC 4889.
See Gottlieb comments for 4882 about the duplicate entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin.
*see HLA*

NGC 4887
(= PGC 44796 = MCG -02-33-087)

Discovered (Apr 21, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a) in Virgo (RA 13 00 39.3, Dec -14 39 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4887 (Tempel list V (#27), 1860 RA 12 53 18, NPD 103 54.7) is "very faint, I 69 to northeast," WH I 69 being NGC 4902.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin.

NGC 4888
(= PGC 44766 = MCG -01-33-066, and not =
NGC 4879)
Discovered (Mar 23, 1789) by William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 16, 1828) by John Herschel
A 13th magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Virgo (RA 13 00 36.3, Dec -06 04 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4888 (= GC 3350 = JH 1505 = WH II 778, 1860 RA 12 53 21, NPD 95 19.0) is "pretty faint, considerably small, extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle, double star to northwest."
Additional Note: RNGC misidentified NGC 4888 as NGC 4879; hence the warning above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4888
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4888
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy, also showing NGC 4878 and PGC 44787
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4888, also showing NGC 4878 and the double star (PGC 44787) incorrectly listed as NGC 4879

NGC 4889 (=
NGC 4884)
(= PGC 44715 = UGC 8110 = CGCG 160-241 = MCG +05-31-077)

Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4889)
Also observed (Mar 26, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4889)
Discovered (Apr 22, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4884)
A magnitude 11.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 08.1, Dec +27 58 37)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4889 (= GC 3351 = JH 1507 = WH II 391, 1860 RA 12 53 22, NPD 61 16.0) is "pretty bright, pretty much extended, brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to north."
Per Gottlieb, WH's position is 3.4 arcmin northwest of the galaxy, which is the same error he made for NGC 4874, the other bright galaxy in this region. JH made two observations, with very uncertain RAs; but his sketch verifies the identity, and his description of his 1510 on sweep 65 includes a reference to this galaxy. Gottlieb refers to his notes for 4882/4884 for d'Arrest's duplicate entry.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.0 arcmin.
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 4889 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type E+4.
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, also showing lenticular galaxy NGC 4894, elliptical galaxies NGC 4886 and IC 4011, and part of the elliptical pair of galaxies listed as NGC 4898
Above, a 4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4889, also showing NGC 4886, 4894 and 4898 and IC 4011
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on NGC 4889, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Unlabeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Below, the same region with labels for NGC 4876, 4883, 4886, 4889, 4894 and 4898,
and for IC 3998, IC 4011, IC 4021, and IC 4026
Labeled SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, also showing lenticular galaxies NGC 4883, NGC 4894, IC 3998 and IC 4026, elliptical galaxies NGC 4876, NGC 4886, IC 4011, IC 4021 and the pair of elliptical galaxies listed as NGC 4898
*see HLA*

NGC 4890
(= PGC 44793 = MCG -01-33-067)

Discovered (Mar 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 12, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SABm? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 00 39.1, Dec -04 36 16)
(This position is for the bar on the southern side, not the center of the overall structure)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4890 (= GC 3352 = JH 1506 = WH III 614, 1860 RA 12 53 24, NPD 93 50.1) is "considerably faint, small, irregularly round, brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 13 00 37.7, Dec -04 35 26, less than 0.9 arcmin north-northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 3360 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 4890 is about 155 to 160 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.95 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 40 to 45 thousand light-years across.
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4890
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 4890
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4890

NGC 4891
(= "PGC 5067499", and not =
NGC 4897)
Recorded (Apr 21, 1882) by Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 14.3(?) star in Virgo (RA 13 00 47.1, Dec -13 25 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4891 (Tempel list V (#28), 1860 RA 12 53 24, NPD 102 40.0) is a "faint nebulous star."
Per Gottlieb, misidentified as NGC 4897 (and vice-versa) in almost all modern sources. Per Corwin, this is the 14th magnitude * 2 arcmin nw of NGC 4897 (at Tempel's position).

PGC 938216
(= 2MASXJ13004675-1325104)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent "neighbor" of
NGC 4891
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 00 46.8, Dec -13 25 10)
Physical Information: Since 4891 is a star inside our own galaxy, no galaxy can be an actual companion, but only something in the same part of the sky.
LEDA B 17.2, I 15.1 -> V 16.5(?); NED 3K Vr 26919 km/sec, z 0.0897924296728; so only an extremely distant background galaxy

NGC 4892
(= PGC 44697 = UGC 8108 = CGCG 160-081 = MCG +05-31-078)

Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 19, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 03.5, Dec +26 53 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4892 (= GC 3353 = JH 1508 = WH II 390, 1860 RA 12 53 28, NPD 62 21.1) is "very faint."
Per Gottlieb, WH's position was accurate, but JH's RA was 11 seconds of time too large.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.3 arcmin.

NGC 4893 (=
IC 4015 + IC 4016)
(= UGC 8111 = CGCG 189-010)
(= PGC 44690 = IC 4015 = MCG +06-29-008
+ PGC 44696 = IC 4016 = MCG +06-29-009)

Discovered (Apr 24, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4893)
Discovered (Apr 1, 1878) by John Dreyer (and later listed as NGC 4893)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1903) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 4015)
Discovered (Mar 21, 1903) by Max Wolf (and later listed as IC 4016)
A pair of galaxies in Canes Venatici (RA 12 59 59.7, Dec +37 11 27)
PGC 44690 = IC 4015 = A magnitude 14.3 elliptical galaxy (type E2?) at RA 12 59 59.6, Dec +37 11 36
PGC 44696 = IC 4016 = A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) at RA 12 59 59.8, Dec +37 11 17
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4893 (= GC 5700, d'Arrest, 4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 12 53 29, NPD 52 03.5) is "very faint, 20th magnitude star to southwest, 17th magnitude star to northeast."
Per Gottlieb, it was actually Dreyer, working as an assistant to the 4th Lord Rosse, who made the observation of Apr 1, 1878. Usually R* (the symbol used in the NGC) means that Lord Rosse himself observed an object; but perhaps, since Dreyer was used to crediting the discoveries of the 3rd Lord Rosse's assitants to their employer, inadvertently did the same thing with his own observation, instead of giving himself the credit for the observation.
Per Corwin, Wolf probably thought his discovery was new because there was a plate defect which Wolf mistook for 4893.
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 44690 listed as 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin. (Note: The classification seems uncertain, but the images suggest it is an elliptical.)
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy PGC 44690 and spiral galaxy PGC 44696, which comprise NGC 4893
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4893, also listed as IC 4015 and 4016
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy PGC 44690 and spiral galaxy PGC 44696, which comprise NGC 4893

Another fine mess; not listed in Steinicke, so need data from elsewhere

NGC 4894 (=
NGC 4898)
((= PGC 44736 (= CGCG 160-248 = MCG +05-31-082)

The above designations apply to the psir of galaxies designated as PGC 44736 and PGC 3098454
Discovered (Mar 30, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 4894)
Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4898)
Also observed (May 15, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as NGC 4898)
A pair of galaxies in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 17.9, Dec +27 57 21)
PGC 44736 = A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E0?) at RA 13 00 17.7, Dec +27 57 19
PGC 3098454 = A 14th magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E3?) at RA 13 00 18.1, Dec +27 57 24
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4894 (= GC 3354 = JH 1510 = WH III 363?, 1860 RA 12 53 30, NPD 61 17.2) is "pretty faint, small, round." In the IC2 Dreyer states "4894 is not = WH III 363, the latter is IC 4051," leading to the lack of any observational credit for William Herschel, despite the original NGC entry.
Per Gottlieb, all modern catalogs (including Steinicke's) misassign CGCG 160-247 = PGC 44732 to NGC 4894, but per Corwin 4894 must be a galaxy an arcmin south of 4889, so 4894 cannot be PGC 44732, which lies an arcmin northwest of 4889, and there are no pre-NGC observations of PGC 44732, period. Gottlieb also notes that JH's second observation of JH 1510 actually was of 4889, and attached WH III 363 to JH 1510, but III 363 is probably NGC 4908 (though Dreyer assigned it ito IC 4051 in his 1912 corrections).

Discovery Note: Formerly (and in many references still) thought to be PGC 44732.
Physical Information:

PGC 44732
(= CGCG 160-247, but not =
NGC 4894)
Not an NGC object but listed here because misidentified as NGC 4894 in "all modern catalogs"
A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 16.5, Dec +27 58 03)
Now listed by Corwin as merely an apparent companion of NGC 4894/8.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.1 arcmin?

Corwin now states 4895 = 4896; need to check his updated remarks
NGC 4895
(= PGC 44737 = UGC 8113 = CGCG 160-249 = MCG +05-31-081)
(and not =
NGC 4896)
Discovered (May 5, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4895)
Discovered (May 12, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as NGC 4896)??
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0 pec?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 17.9, Dec +28 12 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4895 (= GC 5701, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 12 53 30, NPD 61 02.5) is "very faint, small, round."
Per Corwin, = NGC 4896; the position for both galaxies is from his list, so if they are NOT the same, the positions will have to be changed.
Per Gottlieb, the UGC declination is 7 arcmin too far south.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.6 arcmin.

PGC 44717
(CGCG 160-245 = "NGC 4895A")

Not an NGC object, but sometimes called NGC 4895A due to its proximity to
NGC 4895
A magnitude 15.0 elliptical galaxy (type E5) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 09.1, Dec +28 10 13)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin.

See 4895 for Corwin's changed opinion NGC 4896
(= PGC 44768 = UGC 8117 = CGCG 160-087 = MCG +05-31-084)
(and not =
NGC 4895)
Discovered (May 5, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 4895)??
Discovered (May 12, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan (and later listed as NGC 4896)
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 17.9, Dec +28 12 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4896 (Bigourdan (list II #68), 1860 RA 12 53 31, NPD 60 56) is "very faint, very small, round, much brighter middle."
Per Corwin, = NGC 4895; the position for both galaxies is from his list, so if they are NOT the same, the positions will have to be changed.
Discovery Notes: Formerly (and in many references still) thought to be PGC 44768. E.g., Gottlieb lists it as such, though he states that there are several other candidates, including NGC 4895, so I need to see why that is supposedly wrong, and if so, perhaps alter the following entry.

NGC 4897
(= PGC 44829 = UGCA 316 = MCG -02-33-089, and not
NGC 4891)
Discovered (May 2, 1878) by Édouard Stephan
Discovered (Apr 21, 1882) by Wilhelm Tempel
A 12th magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)bc) in Virgo (RA 13 00 52.9, Dec -13 26 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4897 (Tempel list V (#28), 1860 RA 12 53 31, NPD 102 41.9) is "faint."
Per Gottlieb, 4897 is misidentified as 4891 (and vice-versa) in almost all modern sources, hence the warning about that).
Stephan probably credited by Steinicke; need to check his historical lists.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 2.3 arcmin. A Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 2).
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 4897 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type SAB(r)bc.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4897
Above, a 12 arcmin DSS image centered on NGC 4897
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4897
Below, a 3 by 3.25 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4897

PGC 937967
A magnitude 16.3(?) spiral? galaxy (type Sm / Irr?) in
Virgo (RA 13 01 06.9, Dec -13 26 24)
Physical Information: LEDA B 16.7, I 15.9 -> V 16.3(??); nothing else available anywhere

NGC 4898 (=
NGC 4894 = "PGC 3167600")
(= CGCG 160-248 = MCG +05-31-082)

The designations above apply to the pair of galaxies, PGC 44736 + PGC 3098454
Probably discovered (Apr 13, 1831) by John Herschel
Discovered (Apr 6, 1864) by Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (May 15, 1885) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A pair of galaxies in Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 17.9, Dec +27 57 21)
PGC 44736 = A magnitude 13.5 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) at RA 13 00 17.7, Dec +27 57 19
PGC 3098454 = A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) at RA 13 00 18.1, Dec +27 57 24
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4898 (d'Arrest, Bigourdan, 1860 RA 12 53 32, NPD 61 18) is "very faint, small, close to h 1510," h 1510 = JH 1510 being NGC 4894.
Per Gottlieb, all modern catalogs misassign CGCG 160-247 = PGC 44732 to NGC 4898, but since 4898 = 4894, that is simply wrong. Also, see the notes for 4894 stating that JH's 1510 was almost certainly 4898, and not CGCG 160-247, because the offset is in the wrong direction.
Steinicke lists both galaxies as PGC 44736.
Physical Information: Apparent size of PGC 44736 is 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin; of PGC 3098454 is 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin.
SDSS image of the pair of elliptical galaxies, PGC 44736 and PGC 3098454, that comprise NGC 4898; also shown is lenticular galaxy NGC 4894
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4898, also showing NGC 4894
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Unlabeled SDSS image of region near the pair of elliptical galaxies, PGC 44736 and PGC 3098454, that comprise NGC 4898, showing numerous Coma Cluster galaxies
Below, the same region with labels for NGC 4883, 4886, 4889, 4894, 4898 and 4906,
and IC 4011, 4021, 4026, 4041 and 4042
Labeled SDSS image of region near the pair of elliptical galaxies, PGC 44736 and PGC 3098454, that comprise NGC 4898. Also shown are lenticular galaxies NGC 4883, NGC 4894, IC 4026 and IC 4042, and elliptical galaxies NGC 4886, NGC 4889, NGC 4906, IC 4011, IC 4021 and IC 4041
*see HLA*

NGC 4899
(= PGC 44841 = MCG -02-33-090)

Discovered (Feb 8, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type SBc) in Virgo (RA 13 00 56.6, Dec -13 56 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4899 (= GC 3355 = WH II 300, 1860 RA 12 53 34, NPD 103 11.5) is "pretty faint, extremely large." In the IC2 Dreyer states "4899 in the description, for extremely large read consideraby large."
Per Gottlieb, in his Slough Catalog, JH mistakely assumed his observatios of JH 1517 = NGC 4924 were the same as WH II 300 with a one degree error in the NPD; but by the time he published the GC he had realizedthey were not the same, so the GC and NGC identifications are correct.Physical Information: Apparent size 2.4 by 1.4 arcmin.
DSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 4899
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 4899
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 4899
*Carnegie image available here
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4800 - 4849) ←NGC Objects: NGC 4850 - 4899→ (NGC 4900 - 4949)