Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4950 - 4999) ←NGC Objects: NGC 5000 - 5049 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (NGC 5050 - 5099)
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QuickLinks:
5000, 5001, 5002, 5003, 5004, 5005, 5006, 5007, 5008, 5009, 5010, 5011, 5012,
5013, 5014, 5015, 5016, 5017, 5018, 5019, 5020, 5021, 5022, 5023, 5024, 5025,
5026, 5027, 5028, 5029, 5030, 5031, 5032, 5033, 5034, 5035, 5036, 5037, 5038,
5039, 5040, 5041, 5042, 5043, 5044, 5045, 5046, 5047, 5048, 5049

Page last updated Sep 19, 2021
Rechecked 'final' Corwin positions, updated de Vaucouleurs Atlas notes, Steinicke physical database, designations
Checked Gottlieb for IDs, discovery info, other historical databases
NOTE TO SELF: Finish all entries for HCG 71 ASAP
WORKING 5009: Adding LEDA/NED data for later use
WORKING 5009: adding pix to confirm basic types (detailed types to be estimated later)
Minor modifications to de Vaucouleurs entries (any HCG/Arp/Arp-Madore entries?)
NEXT: Check Dreyer entries, precess as first step for IDs, then on to NGC 5050-5099 for now
LATER: Complete all entries, consider preparation for publication

NGC 5000
(= PGC 45658 = UGC 8241 = CGCG 160-152 = MCG +05-31-144)

Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 30, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 09 47.5, Dec +28 54 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5000 (= GC 3433 = JH 1544 = WH III 366, 1860 RA 13 03 06) is "considerably faint, pretty small, a little extended."
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5610 km/sec, NGC 5000 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 1.05 arcmins, it is about 115 thousand light years across. (Note: Almost certainly a physical companion of its apparent companion)
LEDA S(r)bc, V 13.3; NED RIDE 24.4 - 84.8 (median 77.2) Mpc, SB(rs)bc, starburst, 3K Vr 5852 km/sec
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5000
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5000
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy, also showing PGC 214077 and PGC 4357522
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5000

"PGC 4357522"
(= SDSS J130948.35+285334.3)

Not an NGC object listed here as a probable interacting companion of
NGC 5000
A magnitude 18.3(?) elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 09 48.4, Dec +28 53 34)
Note About PGC Designation: Although HyperLEDA assigned a PGC Designation to this galaxy, a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being shown in quotes. To search either PGC or NED use the SDSS designation.
Physical Information: Its recessional velocity is close enough to that for NGC 5000 that it might well be an interacting companion, particularly given its position near the end of one of NGC 5000's spiral arms. Apparent size of about 0.095 by 0.085 arcmin (from the image below)
LEDA "galaxy", B 18.7, I 17.54, (V 18 to 18.5?), 3K Vr 5940 km/sec; NED Extended src, 18.4g, 3K Vr 5937 km/sec
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy 'PGC 4357522', and part of NGC 5000, which are probably interacting companions
Above, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of "PGC 4357522", and part of NGC 5000 (which see for more images)

PGC 214077
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent (but false) companion of
NGC 5000
A magnitude 16.2(?) spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 09 51.7, Dec +28 54 01)
Physical Information: Although an apparent companion of NGC 5000, actually more than 100 million light years further away.
Apparent size of about 0.4 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below)
LEDA Sc, B 16.49, I 15.33 (V 16?), 3K Vr 7991 km/sec; NED Sc, 16.4g, 3K Vr 7992 km/sec, z 0.026657913875598
Classification Note: In an SDSS image, this galaxy looks like an S0 or at most an S0/a; but in PanSTARRS images it looks more diffuse and bluish, so it might well be an Sc, after all; so until I have reason to believe otherwise I'll stick with the LEDA/NED classification, but with a (very big) question mark.
SDSS image of galaxy PGC 214077
Above, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 214077 (see NGC 5000 for wider-field images)
Below, a PanSTARRS image of the same region
PanSTARRS image oflenticular/spiral galaxy PGC 214077

NGC 5001
(= PGC 45631 = UGC 8243 = CGCG 271-020 = MCG +09-22-022)

Discovered (May 1, 1831) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Apr 23, 1868) by C. E. Burton
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 13 09 33.1, Dec +53 29 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5001 (= GC 3434 = JH 1545, 1860 RA 13 03 38, NPD 35 44.5) is "pretty faint, small, irregularly round, gradually brighter middle."
Disovery Note: Per Gottlieb, Burton (using the 4th Lord Rosse's 72-inch telescope) recorded "Patchy, suspect extremely faint patch north-preceding, annular? a little extended north-south." Gottlieb adds a parenthetical question that the "extremely faint patch north-preceding" is "[a spiral arm?]".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.15 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below)
LEDA SBb; NED SB, 3K Vr 9243 km/sec, z 0.03082966090879
SDSS image of region near  spiral galaxy NGC 5001
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5001
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5001

NGC 5002
(= PGC 45728 = UGC 8254 = CGCG 189-034 = MCG +06-29-051)

Discovered (Apr 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)m? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 10 38.2, Dec +36 38 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5002 (= GC 5721, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 13 04 08, NPD 52 36.4) is "very faint, pretty large, extended, 13th magnitude star attached on north."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.9 arcmin (from the images below).
LEDA SBm; NED SBm?, RIDE 12.2 - 13.4 (median 12.8) Mpc, 3K Vr 1286 km/sec
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5002
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5002
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5002

NGC 5003
(= PGC 45559 = UGC 8228 = CGCG 217-013 = MCG +07-27-033)

Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type (R')S0/a? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 08 37.9, Dec +43 44 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5003 (= GC 3435 = WH III 655, 1860 RA 13 04 15, NPD 47 27.3) is "very faint, pretty small, a little brighter middle, Minute of RA?," the last comment presumably meaning that the RA might have been incorrectly recorded.
Discovery Notes: Gottlieb notes that (per Corwin) Herschel was confused about the transit time and gave a wide range in right ascension; and that and other systematic errors explain the poor position. Gottlieb also notes that both RNGC and PGC misidentify NGC 5003 as PGC 45732, so that object is discussed in one of the following entries as a warning about the misidentification.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.05 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below)
LEDA Sa, B 15.03, I 13.04, 3K Vr 10937 km/sec; NED Sa, LINER, 3K Vr 10937 km/sec, z 0.03648247429
Classification Note: Despite the LEDA/NED classification, the SDSS image looks nothing like a typical spiral, but is instead a strangely distorted intermediate lenticular galaxy, so I have classified it as such in the description line.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5003, also showing PGC 214075
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5003, also showing PGC 214075
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5003

PGC 214075
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5003
A magnitude 15.7(?) galaxy (type Sb? sp) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 08 33.8, Dec +43 45 48)
Physical Information: Probably a background galaxy; looks more like an SB0 in the image of NGC 5003, but the image below makes it clear that it is an edge-on spiral galaxy. Apparent size of about 0.6 by 0.08 arcmin (from the image below).
LEDA Sb, B 16.05, I 14.47, (V 15 to 15.5?), 3K Vr 11748 km/sec; NED Sb, 15.9g, 3K Vr 11748 km/sec, z 0.039186452585
Classification Note: "sp" stands for spindle, or edge-on galaxy, and in this case, other than its nuclear bulge, an ultrathin galaxy.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 214075
Above, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 214075; see NGC 5003 for a wider-field image

PGC 45732 (not =
NGC 5003?)
(= MCG +07-27-037)

Maybe/maybe not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes (mis?)identified as NGC 5003
A magnitude 15.3(?) spiral galaxy (type (R)SA(rs)bc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 10 42.0, Dec +42 17 05)
Historical (Mis?)Identification: A search of Wikisky for NGC 5003 shows PGC 45732; so there must be some kind of problem with the identification of 5003. This will be dealt with ASAP, but for now, the object listed as NGC 5003 by Corwin and Steinicke is the one listed in the entry above.
Physical Information: 1.05 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below); whether the other objects in the image have anything to do with the main galaxy remains to be seen.
LEDA Sb, B 15.73, I 14.01, 3K Vr 12071 km/sec; NED SABbc, 15.3g, 3K Vr 12071 km/sec, z 0.04026413544
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 45732, which is sometimes (mis?)identified as NGC 5003
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 45732
Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 45732, which is sometimes (mis?)identified as NGC 5003

NGC 5004
(= PGC 45756 = UGC 8260 = CGCG 160-157 = MCG +05-31-149)

Discovered (Mar 13, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 26, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 11 01.6, Dec +29 38 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5004 (= GC 3436 = JH 1546 = WH III 305, 1860 RA 13 04 21, NPD 59 36.7) is "very faint, very small, very little extended."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.0 arcmin (from the images below, not including fainter outer regions)
LEDA S(r)0; NED S0, RIDE 85.5 - 105 (median 91.95) Mpc, 3K Vr 7305 km/sec, z 0.024366926514399
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5004, also showing IC 4210 and PGC 45757
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5004, also showing IC 4210 and PGC 45757
Below, a 1.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5004

IC 4210
(= PGC 45742 = CGCG 160-155 = MCG +05-31-148 = "NGC 5004B")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5004B
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 10 47.6, Dec +29 42 36)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: Even under the best of circumstances, using non-standard "letter" designations for NGC/IC objects can lead to all sorts of problems (see PGC 45757, below). Such designations are especially egregious when, as in the case of IC 4210, the galaxy already has a perfectly good NGC/IC designation of its own, and the best advice is that other than in warnings such as this one, non-standard designations should never be used.
Physical Information: Since the galaxy has a perfectly good IC designation, see IC 4210 for anything else.

PGC 45757
(= UGC 8259 = CGCG 160-156 = MCG +05-31-150 = "NGC 5004C" = "NGC 5004A")

Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 5004C, and sometimes, NGC 5004A)
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rl,s)ab? pec) in
Coma Berenices (RA 13 11 01.7, Dec +29 34 42)
Warning About Non-Standard Designations: Since there are no standards for adding letters to NGC/IC designations, it is not unusual to have a situation like this one, where the same galaxy has more than one "name", and in many cases leads to data belonging to one object being assigned to a completely different one. For such reasons, other than in warnings like this, such non-standard designations should never be used.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.05 by 0.5 arcmin for the central galaxy, and 1.8 by 1.25 arcmin including the broad spiral arms (from the images below)
LEDA (R)SBab; NED SBab, RIDE 68.4 - 119 (median 74.8) Mpc, starburst, 3K Vr 7528 km/sec, z 0.025110931793
Classification Note: The elongated bar that spans the entire inner portion of the galaxy is faint, but obviously a bar. Its central portion has an unusual "boxy" shape more often seen in certain types of lenticular galaxies, and in some ways the main galaxy does resemble a peuliar lenticular, but the broad arms that nearly form a ring around the galaxy cannot be ignored, despite their being too faint to show in any detail. "rl" is used to indicate the fact that the full inner "ring" is more elongated than round, which is designated by the "l", for "lens-shaped".
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 45757, also showing
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 45757
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 45757

NGC 5005
(= PGC 45749 = PGC 2092196 = UGC 8256 = CGCG 189-035 = MCG +06-29-052)

Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 27, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (May 4, 1861) by Samuel Hunter
A magnitude 9.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 10 56.3, Dec +37 03 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5005 (= GC 3437 = JH 1547 = WH I 96, 1860 RA 13 04 25, NPD 52 11.6) is "very bright, very large, very much extended 66░, very suddenly brighter middle and nucleus."
Discovery Note: Gottlieb notes that the dark lane north of the nucleus was suspected during several observations at Birr Castle (using the 72-inch "Leviathan of Parsonstown" (the Lords Rosses' surname was Parsons, and the nearby town was named after them), and in particular, a note for May 4, 1861 states "Nucleus elongated and perhaps not in direction of major axis of nebula. Dark lane suspected north and perhaps on the other side also, coming slightly preceding nucleus?" Hunter was the 3rd Lord Rosse's assistant from 1860 to 1864, so I have credited him with that observation.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 5.0 by 2.2 arcmin (from the images below)
LEDA SABb, Sy3b; NED SAB(rs)bc, LINER, Sy2, RIDE 13.7 - 34.6 (median 19.3) Mpc, 3K Vr 1174 km/sec
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 5005 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type SAB(s)b.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5005
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5005
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5005
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide image of the central galaxy
(Image Credit NASA/ESA, L. Ho (Peking University); Processing Gladys Kober (NASA/Catholic University of America))
HST image of central part of spiral galaxy NGC 5005

NGC 5006
(= PGC 45806 = ESO 576-006 = MCG -03-34-011)

Discovered (Mar 31, 1881) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SAB(rs)0/a? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 11 45.8, Dec -19 15 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5006 (Tempel list V, 1860 RA 13 04 30, NPD 108 30) has a faint star close preceding (to the west)".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.9 by 1.95 arcmin (from the images below)
LEDA (R)SB0/a; NED RIDE1 33.8 Mpc, (R)SB(r)0+, (R')SB(r)a, 3K Vr 3067 km/sec
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5006
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5006
Below, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 5006
PanSTARRS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5006
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5006

NGC 5007
(= PGC 45605 = UGC 8240 = CGCG 294-021 = MCG +10-19-042)

Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type (R')SB(r)0/a? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 13 09 14.4, Dec +62 10 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5007 (= GC 3438 = WH III 848, 1860 RA 13 04 35, NPD 27 07.3) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size about 1.25 by 1.05 for central galaxy and main ring, and about 1.75 arcmin with faint northern extension (from the images below)
LEDA E/S0; NED E/S0, 3K Vr 8460 km/sec, z 0.0282199257485
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5007, also showing PGC 45617
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5007, also showing PGC 45617
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5007

PGC 45617
(= CGCG 294-023 = MCG +10-19-044)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5007
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type S(r)0?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 09 30.6, Dec +62 09 46)
Physical Information: About 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin (from the image below).
LEDA S(r)0, B 15.56, I 14.03, V 15?; NED S0, 3K 8327 km/sec, z 0.027775921017
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 45617
Above, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 45617 (see NGC 5007 for a wide-field view)

NGC 5008 (=
IC 4381 = HCG 71A)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 71)
(= PGC 50629 = UGC 9073 = GCG 132-078 = CGCG 133-001 = MCG +04-33-042)

Discovered (May 18, 1862) by Heinrich d'Arrest (and later listed as NGC 5008)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1895) by Stephane Javelle (and later listed as IC 4381)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type (R':)SB(rs)bc? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 14 10 57.2, Dec +25 29 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5008 (= GC 3439, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 13 04 37, NPD 63 51.7) is "pretty faint, pretty large, round". The position precesses to RA 13 11 20.9, Dec +25 23 34, but there is nothing there nor anywhere near there. However, this observation turns out to one of a few cases in which d'Arrest's paper (either by carelessness in his work or an error in the printing) has an error of exactly one hour in the right ascension (such one-digit errors are common even in modern papers, and have often led to a single object being assigned numerous nearly identical designations; it is just unfortunate that the error occurred at such an important place in the position). A corrected position of 1860 14 04 37, NPD 63 51.7 precesses to (2000) RA 14 10 59.4, Dec +25 28 37, about 1.3 arcmin south-southeast of the galaxy listed above, and a 10th magnitude star noted by d'Arrest is present, albeit to the south instead of the north, so the identification is considered certain.
 Corwin notes that the problem with the position of the 10th magnitude star is not considered a serious one, as the "offsets" recorded by d'Arrest from the star to the galaxy are nearly correct: namely, d'Arrest put the star 1.1 seconds of time to the west and 95 arcsec to the north of the nebula, while it is actually 1.3 seconds of time to the west and 86 arcsec to the south; but the difference in the numbers are well within normal measurement errors, and mistakes involving direction are even more common than mistakes involving numerical values. However, as noted in the following paragraph, Javelle's accurately recorded observation has caused even some references that acknowledge the identity of NGC 5008 as the galaxy listed above to use the IC designation for the galaxy, instead of the NGC designation.
Designation Problem: Although there is essentially no doubt that PGC 50629 is NGC 5008, most modern references list this galaxy as IC 4381. However, since the identification as NGC 5008 is essentially certain even HyperLEDA, which lists this as IC 4381, also lists it as NGC 5008, and I have followed NED, Corwin, Steinicke and Gottlieb in following the tradition of using NGC designations in preference to IC designations, so the entry for IC 4381 only contains historical material and a link to this entry.
Physical Information: Since NGC 5008 is a member of a physical group (NGC 5008, IC 4381 and PGC 50640), the best measure of the group's distance is the average of their individual recessional velocities. For NGC 5008, the recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background is about 9515 km/sec; for IC 4381, it is about 9660 km/sec; and for PGC 50640, it is about 9045 km/sec. The average of those values is about 9405 km/sec. Based on that (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that the group is about 435 to 440 million light-years away, in fairly reasonable agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 470 to 535 million light-years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the group was about 420 to 425 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 430 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.2 by 0.95 arcmin for the main galaxy and about 2.4 by 1.35 arcmin for the outer arm (from the images below), the main body of NGC 5008 is about 145 to 150 thousand light-years across and its outer arm spans about 295 thousand light-years. Aside from the extended and fragmented southern spiral arm that wraps nearly 3/4 of the way around the galaxy, it is characterized by an active galactic nucleus, suggesting some sort of disturbance in the not too distant past, most likely as the result of an interaction with one of its companions.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5008, a member of Hickson Compact Group 71. Also shown are the other member, IC 4382, PGC 50640 and PGC 50641
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5008
Also shown are other members of HCG 71: IC 4382, PGC 50640, and PGC 50641
Below, a 4.8 arcmin wide image of HCG 71
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 71, consisting of NGC 5008 (= IC 4381), IC 4382, PGC 50640 and PGC 50641
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 5008, offset to show its extended outer arm
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5008, a member of Hickson Compact Group 71, and also known as HCG 71A

NGC 5009
(= PGC 45739 = UGC 8258 = CGCG 245-025 = MCG +08-24-061)

Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 7, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 10 47.0, Dec +50 05 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5009 (= GC 3440 = JH 1550 = WH III 820, 1860 RA 13 04 46, NPD 39 09.9) is "very faint, round, between 2 very small stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5010
(= PGC 45868 = MCG -03-34-015)

Discovered (May 9, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 12 26.4, Dec -15 47 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5010 (= GC 3442 = JH 1548, 1860 RA 13 04 51, NPD 105 03.2) is "very faint, round, brighter middle, 10th magnitude star 5 arcmin to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5011
(= PGC 45898 = ESO 269-065 = MCG -07-27-042)

Discovered (Jun 3, 1834) by
John Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1878) by Joseph Turner
Amagnitude 11.4 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Centaurus (RA 13 12 51.9, Dec -43 05 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5011 (= GC 3443 = JH 3473, 1860 RA 13 04 52, NPD 132 21.1) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, among 4 stars".
Discovery Notes: In the 1820's and 30's, James Dunlop's discoveries with the 48-inch Great Melbourne Telescope were received with enthusiasm by Northern Hemisphere astronomers; but when John Herschel was unable to find many of Dunlop's objects, observations made with the GMT became pretty much dismissed as unreliable. But in 2010 Glen Cozens showed that Dunlop's work was far better than had been thought, and subsequent efforts to go through the GMT logbooks have turned up numerous discoveries by its observers. Per Gottlieb, Turner's observation of what later became NGC 5011 is recorded in the logbook for the date shown above. Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 2.1 arcmin?

PGC 45847
(= ESO 269-063 = MCG -07-27-041 = "NGC 5011A")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5011A
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in
Centaurus (RA 13 12 09.7, Dec -43 18 28)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.7 arcmin?

PGC 45918
(ESO 269-067 = "NGC 5011B")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5011B
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Centaurus (RA 13 13 12.1, Dec -43 14 47)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

PGC 45917
(= ESO 269-068 = "NGC 5011C")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5011C
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0? pec) in
Centaurus (RA 13 13 11.9, Dec -43 15 55)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 5012
(= PGC 45795 = UGC 8270 = CGCG 130-016 = MCG +04-31-012)

Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 29, 1832) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 11 37.1, Dec +22 54 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5012 (= GC 3441 = JH 1549 = WH I 85, 1860 RA 13 04 53, NPD 66 20.4) is "pretty faint, considerably large, extended 17░, binuclear, 9th magnitude star to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.7 arcmin?

PGC 45884
(= PGC 1676837 = UGC 8290 = CGCG 130-020 = MCG +04-31-014 = "NGC 5012A")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5012A
A magnitude 13.8 peculiar galaxy (type pec?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 13 12 41.8, Dec +22 49 48)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 1.1 arcmin?

Corwin notes companions SDSS J131248.66+225156.0 (= PGC 4538446) at RA 13 12 48.7, Dec +22 51 56
and 2MASX J13124913+2251519 (= PGC 1677429) at RA 13 12 49.2, Dec +22 51 52

NGC 5013
(= PGC 45838 = CGCG 044-024 = MCG +01-34-007)

Discovered (Apr 30, 1864) by
Albert Marth
A magnitude 15.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Virgo (RA 13 12 07.4, Dec +03 11 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5013 (= GC 5722, Marth 248, 1860 RA 13 05 00, NPD 86 04) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5014
(= PGC 45787 = UGC 8271 = CGCG 189-037 = MCG +06-29-055)

Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 11, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 11 31.3, Dec +36 16 55)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5014 (= GC 3444 = JH 1551 = WH II 414, 1860 RA 13 05 02, NPD 52 58.7) is "pretty faint, small, extended, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5015
(= PGC 45862 = MCG -01-34-012)

Discovered (Mar 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 16, 1826) by John Herschel
Also observed (July 1899) by DeLisle Stewart
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Virgo (RA 13 12 22.9, Dec -04 20 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5015 (= GC 3445 = JH 1552 = WH II 637, 1860 RA 13 05 08, NPD 93 36.0) is "faint, considerably large, irregularly round, a little brighter middle".
The second IC adds "5015 is DeLisle Stewart's #372, RA 13 04 44, NPD 93 35, extremely faint, extremely small, considerably extended 55 degrees. Neither John nor William Herschel determined the RA accurately".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 5016
(= PGC 45836 = UGC 8279 = CGCG 130-019 = MCG +04-31-013)

Discovered (Apr 10, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 27, 1867) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 12 06.7, Dec +24 05 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5016 (= GC 3446 = WH II 356, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 13 05 23, NPD 65 09.8) is "pretty bright, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 5017
(= PGC 45900 = MCG -03-34-016)

Discovered (May 7, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 11, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Virgo (RA 13 12 54.5, Dec -16 45 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5017 (= GC 3447 = JH 1553 = WH III 669, 1860 RA 13 05 28, NPD 106 00.9) is "very faint, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 5018
(= PGC 45908 = UGCA 335 = ESO 576-010 = MCG -03-34-017)

Discovered (Apr 8, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 12, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.8 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Virgo (RA 13 13 01.0, Dec -19 31 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5018 (= GC 3448 = JH 1554 = WH II 746, 1860 RA 13 05 31, NPD 108 46.1) is "considerably bright, small, round, much brghter middle pretty bright nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.4 by 2.6 arcmin?

NGC 5019
(= PGC 45885 = UGC 8288 = CGCG 044-027 = MCG +01-34-009)

Discovered (Apr 17, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 9, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SB?) in Virgo (RA 13 12 42.4, Dec +04 43 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5019 (= GC 3449 = JH 1555 = WH III 545, 1860 RA 13 05 37, NPD 84 31.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5020
(= PGC 45883 = UGC 8289 = CGCG 072-024 = MCG +02-34-003)

Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 4, 1829) by John Herschel
Also observed (Feb 16, 1855) by R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Virgo (RA 13 12 39.9, Dec +12 35 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5020 (= GC 3450 = JH 1556 = WH II 129, 1860 RA 13 05 43, NPD 76 39.5) is "considerably faint, considerably large, very little extended, a little brighter middle".
Discovery Note: Gottlieb notes that Mitchell, using the 72-inch "Leviathan" at Birr Castle, wrote "small, round, pretty bright nucleus, with (I suspect) straggling arms of faint nebulosity branching out, perhaps spiral," and was presumably the first to see the spiral structure.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.1 by 2.7 arcmin?

NGC 5021
(= PGC 45834 = UGC 8284 = CGCG 245-030 = MCG +08-24-084)

Discovered (Apr 26, 1830) by
John Herschel
Also observed (Mar 28, 1867) by Robert Ball
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 12 06.3, Dec +46 11 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5021 (= GC 3451 = JH 1557, 1860 RA 13 05 46, NPD 43 04.0) is "pretty faint, considerably small, round, 12th magnitude star 90 arcsec to northeast".
Discovery Note: Per Gottlieb, Lord Rosse's assistant Robert Ball noted "Possibly double, at least there seems to be two bright portions to it." This suggests that he observed the bright knot or merging galaxy discussed in the following paragraph.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.7 arcmin? Corwin notes a companion or knot at RA 13 12 06.0, Dec +46 11 36 (just southwest of the nucleus, near the innermost spiral arm); based on the images to be posted below it doesn't seem likely to be an ordinary "knot" or star-forming region, as those usually appear white or bluish on SDSS images. I suspect it may be the core of a galaxy that is in the last stages of merging with NGC 5021, and if so, NGC 5021 would be classified as bi-nuclear.

NGC 5022
(= PGC 45952 = PGC 45953 = ESO 576-014 = MCG -03-34-021)

Discovered (Mar 31, 1881) by
Wilhelm Tempel
Also observed (1886) by Ormond Stone
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (RA 13 13 30.8, Dec -19 32 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5022 (Tempel list V, O Stone list I (#?), 1860 RA 13 05 55, NPD 108 46) is "very faint, pretty large, extended 30░, gradually brighter middle. east of II 746, faint star close preceding (to west)", (WH) II 746 bring NGC 5018.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.5 by 0.4 arcmin? (??FGC 1581??)

NGC 5023
(= PGC 45849 = UGC 8286 = CGCG 217-017 = MCG +07-27-043)

Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 20, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 12 11.8, Dec +44 02 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5023 (= GC 3452 = JH 1559 = WH II 664, 1860 RA 13 05 56, NPD 45 12.8) is "pretty faint, large, much extended 20░, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 5.8 by 0.8 arcmin? (??FGC 1578??) Per Gottlieb, one of the flattest NGC galaxies.

NGC 5024 (=
M53
(= GCL 22)

Discovered (Feb 3, 1775) by Johann Bode
Also observed (Feb 26, 1775) by Charles Messier and listed as M53
Also observed (May 30, 1783) by William Herschel
Also observed (1825) by Wilhelm Struve
Also observed (May 6, 1826) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.7 globular cluster (type V) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 12 55.2, Dec +18 10 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5024 (= GC 3453 = JH 1558, M53, 1860 RA 13 06 04, NPD 71 05.3) is a "remarkable object, a globular cluster, bright. very compressed, irregularly round, very very much brighter middle, stars of 12th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 13 arcmin. One of the most distant clusters in our galaxy, being 60 thousand light years from us and from the nucleus of the Milky Way.
SDSS image of globular cluster NGC 5024, also known as M53
Above, a 15 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on M53
Below, a closer view of the cluster (Image Credit and ©: Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 5024, also known as M53
Below, a 3.4 arcmin wide closeup of the core of the cluster (Image Credit NASA/ESA/Hubble)
HST image of core of globular cluster NGC 5024, also known as M53

NGC 5025
(= PGC 45887 = UGC 8292 = CGCG 160-162 = MCG +05-31-155)

Discovered (Mar 20, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 29, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 12 44.8, Dec +31 48 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5025 (= GC 3454 = JH 1560 = WH III 649, 1860 RA 13 06 10, NPD 57 26.7) is "very faint, small, a little extended, 13th magnitude star to north".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.0 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 5026
(= PGC 46023 = ESO 269-073 = MCG -07-27-048)

Discovered (Jun 5, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Centaurus (RA 13 14 13.6, Dec -42 57 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5026 (= GC 3455 = JH 3474, 1860 RA 13 06 14, NPD 132 13.0) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to northeast".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 2.1 arcmin?

NGC 5027
(= PGC 45936 = UGC 8297 = CGCG 044-028 = MCG +01-34-010)

Discovered (Apr 17, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 13 13 21.0, Dec +06 03 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5027 (= GC 3456 = JH 1561, 1860 RA 13 06 17, NPD 83 11.6) is "very faint, small, round, pretty gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 5028
(= PGC 45976 = MCG -02-34-011)

Discovered (May 12, 1882) by
Wilhelm Tempel
A magnitude 12.3 elliptical galaxy (type E6?) in Virgo (RA 13 13 45.9, Dec -13 02 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5028 (Tempel list V (#29), 1860 RA 13 06 22, NPD 102 17.9) is "very faint, small, 11th or 12th magnitude star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 5029
(= PGC 45880 = UGC 8293 = CGCG 245-032 = MCG -08-24-087)

Discovered (May 13, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 12 37.6, Dec +47 03 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5029 (= GC 3457 = JH 1562, 1860 RA 13 06 27, NPD 42 10.7) is "faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.1 arcmin?

NGC 5030
(= PGC 45991 = MCG -03-34-023)

Discovered (Mar 17, 1881) by
Edward Holden
A magnitude 12.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 13 54.2, Dec -16 29 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5030 (Holden (#10), 1860 RA 13 06 28, NPD 105 45.0) is "very faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.2 arcmin?

NGC 5031
(= PGC 46006 = MCG -03-34-024)

Discovered (Mar 17, 1881) by
Edward Holden
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 14 03.2, Dec -16 07 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5031 (Holden (#11), 1860 RA 13 06 37, NPD 105 23) is "very faint, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5032
(= PGC 45947 = UGC 8300 = CGCG 160-166 = MCG +05-31-160)

Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 30, 1827) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 13 27.0, Dec +27 48 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5032 (= GC 3458 = JH 1563 = WH III 367, 1860 RA 13 06 46, NPD 61 27.5) is "very faint, pretty large, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.1 by 1.1 arcmin?
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 5032 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type (R')SAB(rs)b.

PGC 45940
(= CGCG 160-165 = MCG +05-31-159 = "NGC 5032B")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5032B
and (per Gottlieb) a physical pair with
NGC 5032
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 13 25.7, Dec +27 45 49)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 5033
(= PGC 45948 = UGC 8307 = CGCG 189-043 = MCG +06-29-062)

Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 27, 1827) by John Herschel
Also observed (Mar 1, 1851) by Bindon Stoney
Also observed (May 3, 1858) by R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 10.2 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)c?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 13 27.5, Dec +36 35 38)
Corwin also lists a knot at 13 13 28.4, +36 33 11; if blue, probably a star-forming region; if not, perhaps a secondary galaxy
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5033 (= GC 3459 = JH 1564 = WH I 97, 1860 RA 13 07 00, NPD 52 39.7) is "very bright, pretty large, extended 167░, suddenly much brighter middle very bright nucleus, star to northwest".
Discovery Notes: Gottlieb notes that two of the 3rd Lord Rosse's assistants noted specific features (using the 72-inch "Leviathan of Parsonstown"). Stoney noted "an appendage preceding" and on a later date, "The patch preceding is very faint, yet distinctly seen as far as in sketch, but I suspect it joins north end of nebula," while Mitchell noted "I also think I see a nebulous knot south-following, in the direction of major axis of nebula," which is probably the HII complex about 2.4 arcmin south of center.
Physical Information: Apparent size 10.7 by 5.0 arcmin?
Classification Note: Ron Buta's Galaxy Morphology Website shows all of the galaxies in the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies, and in a some cases, his site has additional images and classifications. One of his "Non-Atlas Images" uses NGC 5033 as an example of type SA(rs)c.

NGC 5034
(= PGC 45859 = UGC 8295 = CGCG 336-003 = MCG +12-13-001)

Discovered (Apr 7, 1793) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 12 19.0, Dec +70 38 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5034 (= GC 3460 = WH III 909, 1860 RA 13 07 19, NPD 18 36.2) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5035
(= PGC 46068 = MCG -03-34-028)

Discovered (May 5, 1787) by
William Herschel
Discovered (May 17, 1881) by Edward Holden
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 14 49.2, Dec -16 29 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5035 (Holden (#12), 1860 RA 13 07 22, NPD 105 46) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle and nucleus".
Discovery Notes: Per a private communication, Herschel's observation (in sweep 732) was discovered by Steinicke while preparing his book about Herschel's lifetime of astronomical accomplishments, and is not generally known as of this writing.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.1 arcmin?

Corwin also notes a companion (PGC 83828 = 2MASXJ13143485-1629289) at RA 13 14 34.9, Dec -16 29 29

NGC 5036
(= PGC 46057)

Discovered (Jan 25, 1887) by
Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 14.6 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 14 42.8, Dec -04 10 43)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5036 (Leavenworth list II (#458), 1860 RA 13 07 27, NPD 93 26.4) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle, 1st of 2", the other being NGC 5039.
Discovery Note: Gottlieb notes that although Leavenworth's position matches PGC 46057, NGC 5036 is sometimes listed as nonexistent.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5037
(= PGC 46078 = MCG -03-34-029)

Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 14, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)a?) in Virgo (RA 13 14 59.4, Dec -16 35 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5037 (= GC 3461 = JH 1565 = WH II 510, 1860 RA 13 07 33, NPD 105 51.0) is "considerably faint, pretty small, very little extended, brighter middle." The position precesses to RA 13 14 59.9, Dec -16 35 32, barely southeast of the center of the galaxy listed above and on its southeastern rim, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Note: Gottlieb notes that JH mentioned a 12th magnitude star 1 arcmin north-preceding, but that the star is actually north-following (similar confusion about directions, caused by different orientations of the telescope relative to the sky, are fairly common, but not as common as might be expected; the early observers were mostly very careful about such things)..
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 3280 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5037 is about 150 to 155 million light-years away, in poor agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 95 million light-years (the HST press release uses a distance of about 150 million light years). Given that and its apparent size of about 1.85 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 80 to 85 thousand light-years across.
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5037, also showing NGC 5035 and PGC 83848
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 5037, also showing NGC 5035 and PGC 83848
Below, a 1.9 arcmin wide image of NGC 5037 and PGC 83848
(Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, D. Rosario; Acknowledgement L. Shatz)
HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 5037, also showing PGC 83848
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide image of the central portion of NGC 5037 (Image Credit as above)
HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy NGC 5037

PGC 83848
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5037
A magnitude 16.5(?) elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Virgo (RA 13 15 02.5, Dec -16 35 49)
Physical Information: There appear to be no distance estimates of any sort for PGC 83848, but every reference I've seen lists it as a member of the same group of galaxies (the NGC 5044 group) as its apparent neighbor, NGC 5037, so it is presumably around 150 million light-years away, give or take some completely unknown error. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 12 to 14 thousand light years across.
PanSTARRS image of region near NGC 5037, also showing NGC 5035 and elliptical galaxyPGC 83848
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on NGC 5037, also showing NGC 5035 and PGC 83848
Below, a 1.9 arcmin wide image of NGC 5037 and PGC 83848
(Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, D. Rosario; Acknowledgement L. Shatz)
HST image of NGC 5037, also showing elliptical galaxy PGC 83848
Below, a 0.45 arcmin wide image of PGC 83848 (Image Credit as above)
HST image of elliptical galaxy PGC 83848

NGC 5038
(= PGC 46081 = MCG -03-34-031)

Discovered (May 28, 1881) by
Edward Holden
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 15 02.1, Dec -15 57 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5038 (Holden (#13), 1860 RA 13 07 36, NPD 105 12) is "pretty bright, extended 90░, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.3 arcmin?

NGC 5039
(= PGC 1062056, and not =
PGC 46064)
Note to self: SEE CORWIN'S EMAIL of 11/14/2017
Discovered (Jan 25, 1887) by Francis Leavenworth
A magnitude 15.4(?) spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Virgo (RA 13 14 52.0, Dec -04 09 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5039 (Leavenworth list II (#459), 1860 RA 13 07 39, NPD 93 25.4) is "extremely faint, extremely small, extended 45░, 2nd of 2,", the other being NGC 5036.
Designation Problems: The original PGC listed this as PGC 46064 (= PGC 1061140 in a later update), but with an incorrect position that falls on an extremely faint galaxy that could not have been seen by Leavenworth, and is actually a sloppy position for the star to that galaxy's northeast. Many references have corrected the position to that of PGC 1062056 (which Leavenworth could and did see, as shown by Corwin's copy of his sketch), but have kept the original, incorrect PGC designation (for instance, Gottlieb, who usually points out such errors, lists this object as PGC 46064 = PGC 1061140). For that reason, PGC 46064 isdiscussed in the entry linked at the star of this paragraph.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin?
Per Corwin, there are several apparent companions with obscure designations:
(J131454.06-040908.0) at RA 13 14 54.0, Dec -04 09 09
(PGC 3273653) at RA 13 14 51.8, Dec -04 09 52
(2MASX J13145192-0409544) at RA 13 14 51.7, Dec -04 09 50 (a pair with the one below)
(2MASX J13145192-0409544) at RA 13 14 51.9, Dec -04 09 54 (a pair with the one above)

PGC 46064 (not =
NGC 5039)
(= PGC 1061140)

Not an NGC object but listed here since often misidentified as NGC 5039
For now, just see Designation Problems for NGC 5039

NGC 5040
(= PGC 45945 = CGCG 271-024 = MCG +09-22-031)

Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 1, 1867) by Sir Robert Ball
A magnitude 14.2 spiral galaxy (type S??) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 13 32.6, Dec +51 15 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5040 (= GC 3462 = WH II 816, 1860 RA 13 07 50, NPD 37 58.2) is "faint, small, irregularly round, very gradually much brighter middle".
Discovery Note: Gottlieb notes that Ball (using the 72-inch telescope at Birr Castle) wrote "very small, stellar, brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin? Recessional velocity 7515 km/sec.

PGC 3087263
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called part of
NGC 5040
A magnitude 15.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 13 30.8, Dec +51 16 23)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin? (Listed in NED as 2MASX J13133086+5116230) Recessional velocity 16880 km/sec, so although this galaxy is sometimes listed as a companion to NGC 5040, it is more than twice as far away from us and they are merely an optical double.

NGC 5041
(= PGC 46046 = UGC 8319 = CGCG 160-168 = MCG +05-31-162)

Discovered (Apr 19, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
Also observed (April 16, 1904) by Max Wolf
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 14 32.5, Dec +30 42 21)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5041 (= GC 5723, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 13 07 55, NPD 58 23.1) is "faint, small, round".
Discovery Note: Per Gottlieb, d'Arrest's position falls on the galaxy listed above, but Dreyer made a one-digit error, and the NPD is exactly 10 arcmin too large. Max Wolf noted the error and corrected it in his list 9 (#215). As is typical for measurements made on photographic plates, Wolf's "observation date" is the date that the plate involved was exposed, not the date that any given object on the plate was marked or measured.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 5042
(= PGC 46126 = UGCA 340 = ESO 508-031 = MCG -04-31-043)

Discovered (Mar 25, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Hydra (RA 13 15 31.0, Dec -23 59 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5042 (= GC 3463 = JH 3477, 1860 RA 13 07 56, NPD 113 14.5) is "faint, large, round, very gradually very little brighter middle, 9th magnitude star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.2 by 2.2 arcmin?

NGC 5043
(= ESO 132-SC002)

Discovered (Jun 7, 1837) by
John Herschel
An open cluster (or group of stars?) in Centaurus (RA 13 16 16.0, Dec -60 03 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5043 (= GC 3464 = JH 3476, 1860 RA 13 07 56, NPD 149 19.2) is a "cluster, poor, extended, scattered stars of 11th magnitude". Corwin lists the position of the core of the cluster as RA 13 16 39.0, Dec -60 02 30, east northeast of the position listed above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 10 arcmin?

NGC 5044
(= PGC 46115 = UGCA 341 = MCG -03-34-034)

Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 11, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.8 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Virgo (RA 13 15 24.0, Dec -16 23 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5044 (= GC 3465 = JH 1566 = WH II 511, 1860 RA 13 07 57, NPD 105 38.8) is "pretty bright, pretty large, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 by 3.0 arcmin?

NGC 5045
(= ESO 096-SC005)

Discovered (Jun 16, 1835) by
John Herschel
An open cluster in Centaurus (RA 13 16 47.0, Dec -63 25 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5045 (= GC 3466 = JH 3475, 1860 RA 13 07 59, NPD 152 40.4) is a "cluster, very large, very rich, stars of 11th magnitude".
Discovery Note: Per Gottlieb, there is a rich Milky Way field at the position, but no distinct cluster. Corwin suggests that this might be a duplicate observation of NGC 5155, about 10 minutes of time to the east, but Gottlieb states that although JH's descriptions of the two objects are "quite similar," since both objects were recorded in the same sweep, that would require some kind of mixup on Herschel's part.
Physical Information: Apparent size 60 arcmin?

NGC 5046
(= PGC 46141 = MCG -03-34-035)

Discovered (May 17, 1881) by
Edward Holden
A magnitude 13.5 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Virgo (RA 13 15 45.1, Dec -16 19 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5046 (Holden (#14), 1860 RA 13 08 17, NPD 105 35) is "faint, very small, round, stellar nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5047
(= PGC 46150 = MCG -03-34-036)

Discovered (May 7, 1787) by
William Herschel
Discovered (Apr 26, 1867) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 15 48.5, Dec -16 31 08)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5047 (= GC 3468 = WH III 670, 1860 RA 13 08 21, NPD 105 44.5) is "very faint."
Discovery Note: Per Gottlieb, although Herschel's position was 3 arcmin north of the galaxy, d'Arrest also made an observation of this object and recorded an accurate position.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.7 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5048
(= PGC 46179 = ESO 443-087 = MCG -05-31-041)

Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Hydra (RA 13 16 08.4, Dec -28 24 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5048 (= GC 3467 = JH 3478, 1860 RA 13 08 26, NPD 117 40.9) is "pretty faint, round, southwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5051.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.5 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 5049
(= PGC 46166 = UGCA 343 = MCG -03-34-037)

Discovered (Dec 31, 1785) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 15 59.3, Dec -16 23 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5049 (= GC 3469 = WH II 512, 1860 RA 13 08 32, NPD 105 39.0) is "considerably faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 0.6 arcmin?
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5049, also showing elliptical galaxy NGC 5046Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5049, also showing NGC 5046
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5049
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 4950 - 4999) ←NGC Objects: NGC 5000 - 5049→ (NGC 5050 - 5099)