Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5200 - 5249) ←NGC Objects: NGC 5250 - 5299 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (NGC 5300 - 5349)
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Page last updated Sep 3, 2021
Minor modifications of de Vaucouleurs entries
Prior last update Aug 23, 2021
Checked/added Corwin's "final" positions
Checked basic types (e.g., spiral vs lenticular), partly updated formatting
Previous update of Oct 16, 2020:
Updated NGC 5256 update using Vr relative to Cosmic Background Radiation
Resolved a question about the observers of NGC 5279
Checked Corwin's current positions, companion listings
WORKING: Checked updated Steinicke physical data
NEXT: Check updated Steinicke 2017 historical data
Previously checked Dreyer's NGC entries

NGC 5250
(= PGC 47997 = UGC 8594 = CGCG 271-053 = MCG +09-22-085)

Discovered (Apr 26, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 36 07.3, Dec +51 14 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5250 (= GC 3617 = WH II 817, 1860 RA 13 30 50, NPD 38 01.5) is "pretty bright, small, round, very gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 4525 km/sec, NGC 5250 is about 210 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.3 by 0.95 arcmin(?), it is about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5250
Below, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5250; the star at upper left is 7th-magnitude HD 118557
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5250

NGC 5251
(= PGC 48119 = CGCG 161-090 = MCG +05-32-044)

Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S(rs)a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 13 37 24.8, Dec +27 25 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5251 (= GC 3618 = JH 1652 = WH III 369, 1860 RA 13 30 53, NPD 61 51.8) is "very faint, small, very little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5251
Above, a ? arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of NGC 5251 (temporary placeholder)

NGC 5252
(= PGC 48189 = UGC 8622 = CGCG 045-056 = MCG +01-35-022)

Discovered (Feb 2, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 38 15.9, Dec +04 32 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5252 (= GC 3619 = JH 1653 = WH III 505, 1860 RA 13 31 12, NPD 84 46.2) is "very faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.4 by 0.9 arcmin?

NGC 5253
(= PGC 48334 = UGCA 369 = ESO 445-004 = MCG -05-32-060)

Discovered (Mar 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 7, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.4 spiral galaxy (type S? pec) in Centaurus (RA 13 39 56.0, Dec -31 38 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5253 (= GC 3620 = JH 3526 = WH II 638, Dunlop 623, 1860 RA 13 32 00, NPD 120 55.6) is "bright, pretty large, extended 45░▒, pretty suddenly much brighter middle". The second IC notes "In 1895 a new star appeared at the northwest end of this nebula. See diagram in Publ. A. S. Pac., viii. p. 221".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 5.0 by 1.9 arcmin?
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 5253 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type I0 pec.

NGC 5254
(= PGC 48307 = MCG -02-35-012)

Discovered (May 6, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Virgo (RA 13 39 37.9, Dec -11 29 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5254 (= GC 3621 = JH 3527, 1860 RA 13 32 14, NPD 100 47.0) is "pretty bright, large, pretty much extended, gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.2 by 1.5 arcmin?

PGC 170441
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5254
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type S?) in Virgo (RA 13 39 24.7, Dec -11 32 49)
Physical Information: LEDA Sbc, B 15.4, I 13.6; NED RIDE1 93.9 Mpc, 3K Vr 8960 km/sec, z 0.0298870099; not a companion, but a far more distant background galaxy.

NGC 5255
(= PGC 48124 = CGCG 294-051 = MCG +10-19-098)

Discovered (Apr 17, 1789) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 37 18.1, Dec +57 06 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5255 (= GC 3622 = WH III 803, 1860 RA 13 32 22, NPD 32 10.9) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: LEDA Sa, NED Sa, 1.1 x .3 arcmin, 3K Vr 7047 km/sec, z 0.02350526646; but doesn't look like a spiral in the image below
Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.2 arcmin?
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5255
Above, a ? arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of NGC 5255 (just a placeholder for its type)

NGC 5256
(= "PGC 3167706" = UGC 8632 = CGCG 246-021 = MCG +08-25-031)
(All the designations above refer to the pair of galaxies; the individual galaxies only have PGC designations)
(= PGC 48192 + PGC 93123)
Discovered (May 12, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 13, 1830) by John Herschel
A pair of interacting galaxies in Ursa Major (RA 13 38 17.5, Dec +48 16 37)
PGC 48192 = A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) at RA 13 38 17.8, Dec +48 16 41
PGC 93123 = A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) at RA 13 38 17.4, Dec +48 16 32
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5256 (= GC 3623 = JH 1656 = WH III 673, 1860 RA 13 32 33, NPD 40 59.6) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 13 38 17.3, Dec +48 17 38, only 1 arcmin north of the double galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain. There can be no doubt that the pair would have appeared as a single nebula to the Herschels, so NGC 5256 is the pair, not one or the other component.
About The PGC Designation: Though a search of HyperLEDA for NGC 5256 leads to a page for PGC 3167706, a search for that designation returns no result, hence its being placed in quotes. The PGC designations for the individual components yield search results in both LEDA and NED, so they are shown without quotes.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background of 8515 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that NGC 5256 is about 395 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 380 to 385 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 390 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size (all apparent sizes are taken from the images below) of about 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin, PGC 48192 is about 25 to 30 thousand light years across, and PGC 93123's apparent size of about 0.15 by 0.1 arcmin corresponds to about 15 to 17 thousand light years, while the pair's combined size of about 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin corresponds to about 45 thousand light years. The region of gas and stars ejected from the colliding galaxies spans an area of about 2.2 by 1.4 arcmin, which corresponds to about 245 thousand light years. The high velocity of the galaxies' collision has superheated gas in the nuclei of the two galaxies and in the region between them, causing them to emit copious amounts of X-radiation, while gas falling into the regions near their central black holes has fed regions of extremely active star formation, and flung streamers of gas and stars into the space surrounding the galaxies. NGC 5256 is listed as a starburst galaxy, and each component is listed as a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy 3 for PGC 48192, and Sy 2 for PGC 93123). [Note: The press release for the 2008 HST image gives the distance as about 350 million light years, but for such distant objects the actual distances are uncertain, so for all practical purposes this is the same as the Hubble distance of 380 to 385 million light years.]
Discussion Of What The Images Show: Almost all color images of astronomical objects are false-color images. Telescopic images are generally black and white images taken with filters that only allow certain wavelengths of light to reach the recording surface (nowadays usually a CCD chip, but in the past a filmstrip or glass plate). Color images are produced by combining images taken with different filters and applying a specific color range to each filter's image. In the SDSS and 2008 HST image, the choice of color combinations was intended to produce a more or less "natural" view, corresponding to what we might see with our eyes if they were thousands of times more sensitive to the faint light of astronomical objects. In such images regions filled with hot young bluish white stars appear bluish, as in the streamer to the north of NGC 5256. However, it is just as common (if not more so) to emphasize the radiation from gases heated by those hot stars, and since that radiation is concentrated in the red end of the visible spectrum, it is usually represented by reddish colors, as in the 2017 HST image, which shows the heated gases as brightly lit regions, but barely shows the bluish white stars that are heating the gas.
SDSS image of region near the double galaxy NGC 5256
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5256
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image showing the pair of galaxies and their extended collision remnants
SDSS image the double galaxy NGC 5256 and the extended remnants of their collision
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide 2008 HST image of the pair (Image Credit NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration & A. Evans (Univ. of Virginia Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook Univ.))
Older HST image the double galaxy NGC 5256 and the extended remnants of their collision
Below, a 2.2 arcmin wide 2017 HST image of the pair (Image credit ESA/Hubble, NASA)
HST image the double galaxy NGC 5256 and the extended remnants of their collision, emphasizing the more spectacular features of the collision
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide HST image of the brighter portion of the colliding pair (Image credit as above)
HST image of the central portion of NGC 5256
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide labeled version of the image above (Image credit as above)
HST image of the central portion of NGC 5256
Below, a 0.75 by 1 arcmin wide HST image of the central galaxies (Image credit as above)
2017 HST image of the pair of colliding galaxies which comprise NGC 5256
Below, a 0.75 by 1 arcmin wide version of the 2008 HST image of the pair (See wider 2008 image for credits)
2008 HST image of the pair of colliding galaxies which comprise NGC 5256

NGC 5257 (with
NGC 5258 = Arp 240)
(= PGC 48330 = UGC 8641 = CGCG 017-055 = MCG +00-35-015)

Discovered (May 13, 1793) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 39 52.9, Dec +00 50 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5257 (= GC 3624 = JH 1654 = WH II 895, 1860 RA 13 32 45, NPD 88 26.9) is "very faint, small, round, brighter middle, preceding (western) of double nebula," the other being NGC 5258. The position precesses to RA 13 39 53.7, Dec +00 50 24, on the western rim of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby except for the other member of the "double nebula", so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.85 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below), counting its extended "arms".
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258, which comprise Arp 240
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5257 and 5258, which comprise Arp 240
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258, which comprise Arp 240
Below, an HST image of the pair overlaid on the image above
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA /Hubble Collaboration,
and A. Evans (University of Virginia, Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook University))

HST image of spiral galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258, which comprise Arp 240, overlaid on an SDSS background
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide HST image of NGC 5257 (Image Credit as above)HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 5257, part of Arp 240

NGC 5258 (with
NGC 5257 = Arp 240)
(= PGC 48338 = UGC 8645 = CGCG 017-056 = MCG +00-35-016)

Discovered (May 13, 1793) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 13 39 57.7, Dec +00 49 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5258 (= GC 3625 = JH 1655 = WH II 896, 1860 RA 13 32 49, NPD 88 27.3) is "faint, small, irregularly round, following (eastern) of double nebula," the other being NGC 5257. The position precesses to RA 13 39 57.7, Dec +00 50 00, on the northern rim of the nucleus of the galaxy listed above and well within its outline, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby except for the other member of the "double nebula", so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.75 by 1.15 arcmin (from the images above and below), counting its extended "arms".
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258, which comprise Arp 240
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5257 and 5258, which comprise Arp 240
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258, which comprise Arp 240
Below, an HST image of the pair overlaid on the image above
(Image Credit NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA /Hubble Collaboration,
and A. Evans (University of Virginia, Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook University))

HST image of spiral galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258, which comprise Arp 240, overlaid on an SDSS background
Below, a 1.6 arcmin wide HST image of NGC 5258 (Image Credit as above)HST image of spiral galaxy NGC 5258, part of Arp 240

NGC 5259
(= PGC 48292 = CGCG 161-105 = MCG +05-32-052)

Discovered (Apr 27, 1865) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 14.2 elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 39 24.7, Dec +30 59 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5259 (= GC 5749, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 13 33 00, NPD 58 18.1) is "very faint, small, irregularly round." The position precesses to RA 13 39 23.9, Dec +30 59 11, less than 0.3 arcmin southewest of the galaxy listed above and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain. The only question is whether the galaxy to its northwest should be considered to be part of the NGC object (as discussed in the next paragraph, the almost certain answer is "no").
Discovery Note: Gottlieb's observation with a 24-inch telescope sometimes barely showed the faint galaxy to the northwest of NGC 5259, but with a 17.5-inch telescope he couldn't see it at all. So it is essentially impossible that d'Arrest could have seen it with an 11-inch telescope, and despite d'Arrest's description of his "nova" as "irregularly round", NGC 5259 must consist of only the brightest of the three galaxies in the region.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.1 by 0.7 arcmin?

"PGC 4379775"
(SDSS J133923.13+305932.4)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a probable companion of
NGC 5259
A magnitude 15.5(?) galaxy (type E/S0?) in Canes Venatici (13 39 23.1, Dec +30 59 32)
Note About Relationship To NGC 5259: d'Arrest's description of NGC 5259 as "irregularly round" suggests that the companion to the northwest of the obvious galaxy might be part of the NGC object, but as discussed in the entry for NGC 5259, it is essentially certain that d'Arrest couldn't have seen any sign of or any effect due to its northwest companion. So although a probable companion (and according to some suggestions, doomed to merge with NGC 5259 at some point in the future), this galaxy is not part of the NGC object.
Note About PGC Designation: HyperLEDA assigns this a PGC designation, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is placed in quotes.
Physical Information: LEDA E, B 16.4, I 12.9, (V) 15.5(?); NED E2 pec, 3K Vr 18568 km/sec, z 0.061935857789, essentially the same as for NGC 5259, so almost certainly a physical companion.

"PGC 4581279"
(SDSS J133924.85+305914.4)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a probable companion of
NGC 5259
A magnitude 18(?) elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 39 24.9, Dec +30 59 14)
Note About PGC Designation: HyperLEDA assigns this a PGC designation, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is placed in quotes.
Physical Information: LEDA B 18.9, I 16.9, (V) 18(?), S?; NED extended source, 3K Vr 18762 km/sec, z 0.062581844, essentially the same as for NGC 5259, so almost certainly a physical companion.

NGC 5260
(= PGC 48371 = ESO 509-092 = MCG -04-32-050)

Discovered (Apr 6, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Hydra (RA 13 40 19.9, Dec -23 51 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5260 (Swift list I (#24), 1860 RA 13 33 08, NPD 113 10.5) is "extremely faint, pretty large, 3 stars to east in a line".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.6 by 1.4 arcmin?

NGC 5261
(= PGC 48360 = CGCG 045-067)

Discovered (Apr 17, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 40 16.1, Dec +05 04 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5261 (= GC 3626 = JH 1657, 1860 RA 13 33 14, NPD 84 13.1) is "very faint, round, among pretty bright stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5261
Above, a ? arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of NGC 5261 (placeholder for classification only)

NGC 5262
(= PGC 47923 = UGC 8606 = CGCG 353-022)

Discovered (May 5, 1831) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 35 38.6, Dec +75 02 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5262 (= GC 3627 = JH 1660, 1860 RA 13 33 14, NPD 14 14.2) is "extremely faint, small".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.2 by 0.7 arcmin?
Corwin lists an apparent companion (PGC 47875) at RA 13 35 10.0, Dec +75 01 42

NGC 5263
(= PGC 48333 = PGC 1834564 = UGC 8648 = CGCG 161-113 = MCG +05-32-058)

Discovered (Apr 11, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 39 55.7, Dec +28 24 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5263 (= GC 3628 = JH 1658 = WH III 370, 1860 RA 13 33 25, NPD 60 53.5) is "considerably faint, small, much extended 0░▒, 9th magnitude star to southwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5264
(= PGC 48467 = UGCA 370 = ESO 445-012 = MCG -05-32-066)

Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Hydra (RA 13 41 36.6, Dec -29 54 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5264 (= GC 3629 = JH 3528, 1860 RA 13 33 44, NPD 119 12.5) is "very faint, pretty large, round, very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 3.6 by 3.2 arcmin (from the images below). Vr 480 km/sec (too small to ignore peculiar velocities), corresponding to about 22 million light years distance. Redshift-independent distance estimates of about 13.5 to 15.5 million light years; the Hubblesite news release states "just over 15 million light years away". A comparison of the distance estimates suggests that the object is moving away from us, and its Hubble distance is too large.
DSS image of region near irregular galaxy NGC 5264
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5264
Below, a 4 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of irregular galaxy NGC 5264
Below, a 2.6 arcmin wide HST image of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA)
HST image of irregular galaxy NGC 5264

NGC 5265
(= PGC 48354 = CGCG 190-040 = MCG +06-30-068)

Discovered (May 1, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 40 09.1, Dec +36 51 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5265 (= GC 3630 = JH 1659 = WH III 410, 1860 RA 13 33 59, NPD 52 25.5) is "faint, considerably small, very little extended, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 5266
(= PGC 48593 = PGC 490364 = ESO 220-033)

Discovered (Jul 1, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.1 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec (PRG)) in Centaurus (RA 13 43 02.1, Dec -48 10 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5266 (= GC 3631 = JH 3529, 1860 RA 13 34 28, NPD 137 27.7) is "bright, pretty large, very little extended, very gradually a little brighter middle, 3 stars near".
Physical Information: LEDA S0; NED E/SA0?, LINER (= S0/a? or E/SA0? pec)
Apparent size of 3.3 by 2.3 arcmin?
Note About Images Below: Usually, one image database or another can be used to obtain a multispectral "color" image of an NGC object; but in this case, I cannot find an image database that properly aligns the red and blue DSS2 images; so the image below is an enhanced version of only the blue image, desaturated to reflect the fact that it is a monochrome image. The Carnegie-Irvine image is a "natural-color" image, and only the fact that I haven't taken the time to determine the size of the field of view is out of the ordinary.
Classification Note: Every reference I can find lists this as an S0 or E/S0 galaxy, but it is a LINER galaxy (meaning that it exhibits strong emission lines due to interstellar gases heated by hot, bright young stars), and its DSS2 image is certainly peculiar. Fortunately, there is a Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image available, which shows that its basic structure is more typical than might be expected from its DSS2 image; but it is "peculiar", in that it is obviously a polar ring galaxy.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5266
Above, a ? arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 5266 (above and below, placeholders for classification)
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit & © Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5266

PGC 48390
(= PGC 488439 = ESO 220-030 = "NGC 5266A")

Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5266A
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc? pec) in
Centaurus (RA 13 40 37.1, Dec -48 20 32)
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.1 by 2.5 arcmin? NED SB(rs)cd, 3K Vr 3098 km/sec, 12.7 (no bandwith); LEDA SBc, B 12.9 -> V 12 to 12.5
Alignment of color images terrible even in Aladin; monochrome images OK, red shows considerable activity in nucleus, but overexposes, so can't see bar. Blue clearly shows bar.

NGC 5267
(= PGC 48393 = UGC 8655 = CGCG 218-036 = MCG +07-28-049)

Discovered (Apr 28, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 40 40.0, Dec +38 47 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5267 (= GC 3632 = JH 1661, 1860 RA 13 34 33, NPD 50 30.0) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle, small star to northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.4 by 0.5 arcmin?

NGC 5268
(= "PGC 5067742")

Recorded (Jan 17, 1855) by
Edward Cooper
Also observed? (date?) by Arthur von Auwers
A magnitude 11.3 star in Virgo (RA 13 42 12.4, Dec -13 51 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5268 (= GC 3633, Markree Catalog, 1860 RA 13 34 44, NPD 103 09.1) is "a nebula (Auwers 32)".
Note About PGC Designation: As for most NGC objects, HyperLEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object, even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information:

NGC 5269
(= "PGC 3518310")

Discovered (Apr 24, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude ? open cluster (type ?) in Centaurus (RA 13 44 44.0, Dec -62 55 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5269 (= GC 3634 = JH 3530, 1860 RA 13 35 04, NPD 152 11.8) is "a cluster, poor, large, irregular figure, stars of 12th magnitude".
Note About PGC Designation: As for most NGC objects, HyperLEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object, even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.0 arcmin?

NGC 5270
(= PGC 48527 = UGC 8673 = CGCG 045-075 = MCG +01-35-031)

Discovered (Apr 7, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)bc?) in Virgo (RA 13 42 10.9, Dec +04 15 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5270 (= GC 3635 = JH 1662, 1860 RA 13 35 06, NPD 85 01.7) is "extremely faint, small, between 2 stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 5271
(= PGC 48477 = CGCG 161-120 = MCG +05-32-065)

Discovered (May 22, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type (R')SB(rs)bc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 41 42.4, Dec +30 07 31)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5271 (Stephan list XII (#50), 1860 RA 13 35 18, NPD 59 10.0) is "very faint, very small, round, gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin?

NGC 5272 (=
M3)
(= GCL 25 = PGC 2802651)

Discovered (May 3, 1764) by Charles Messier
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.3 globular cluster (type VI) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 11.3, Dec +28 22 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5272 (= GC 3636 = JH 1663, M3, 1860 RA 13 35 44, NPD 60 54.9) is "a very remarkable object, a globular cluster, extremely bright, very large, very suddenly much brighter middle, stars from 11th magnitude". LEDA lists the object as PGC 2802651, and as a globular cluster.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 18.0 arcmin?
NOAO image of globular cluster NGC 5272, also known as M3
Above, an image of M3 (Image Credit: S. Kafka & K. Honeycutt (Indiana University), WIYN, NOAO, NSF)

NGC 5273 (=
IC 895)
(= PGC 48521 = UGC 8675 = CGCG 190-041 = MCG +06-30-072)

Discovered (May 1, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5273)
Also observed (Apr 24, 1827) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5273)
Also observed (Sep 1, 1888) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 895)
A magnitude 11.6 lenticular galaxy (type SA(rs)0/a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 08.4, Dec +35 39 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5273 (= GC 3637 = JH 1664 = WH I 98, 1860 RA 13 35 54, NPD 53 38.3) is "considerably bright, pretty large, round, gradually then pretty suddenly much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 13 42 07.4, Dec +35 39 14, right on the galaxy listed above and the description is a perfect fit, so the identification is certain.
Note About The Duplicate Entry: The equality with IC 895 (which see for a discussion of the duplicate entry) was not discovered until August 2017, and it may take a while for it to become common knowledge.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 1085 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5273 is about 50 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 40 to 70 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of about 2.6 by 2.4 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 35 to 40 thousand light years across.
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 5253 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of galaxy type SA(s)0o. LEDA lists this as type S0, Seyfert Sy1.9; NED as SA(s)0 (= SA(s)0/a). There is no question that there are faint traces of spiral structure in the center of the galaxy, but they also seem to form a ring around the exceptionally bright nucleus, hence my addition of "r" to the classification, but with the "s" underlined to emphasize that that is the usual classification (on the other hand, if there weren't any other classifications I would reverse that, emphasizing the "r" instead of the "s"; so I'm sure that if this was a legal case, the twelve jurors would end up as a "hung" jury).
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5273, also showing NGC 5276
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5273, also showing NGC 5276
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5273

NGC 5274
(= PGC 48536 = CGCG 161-125 = MCG +05-32-066)

Discovered (May 25, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 23.3, Dec +29 50 52)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5274 (Stephan list XII (#51), 1860 RA 13 35 59, NPD 59 26.7) is "very faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?
(Corwin notes an apparent companion (PGC 48566) at RA 13 42 37.0, Dec +29 51 17)

NGC 5275
(= PGC 48544 = CGCG 161-124 = MCG +05-32-067)

Discovered (May 25, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.2 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 23.6, Dec +29 49 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5275 (Stephan list XII (#52), 1860 RA 13 35 59, NPD 59 28.1) is "faint, small, round, gradually much brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?
LEDA S0/a; NED S?, E/S0, 3K Vr 12773 km/sec, z 0.04260654. To me, this looks like an E0, only the very bright nucleus arguing for an E/S0 classification, and certainly not as late as S0/a. It may be that the western "companion" has affected the perception of the galaxy's appearance, but it has nothing to do with this object, being almost certainly background object, as shown below.

PGC 2800981
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5275
A magnitude 17(?) spiral galaxy (type (R')SBcd? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 22.1, Dec +29 49 33)
Physical Information: Vr 1540 km/sec more than 5275, so almost certainly a background galaxy NED mag 17.97, no bandwidth specified. 3K Vr 14315 km/sec, z 0.04774953; LEDA U 17.9, B 17.3, I 16.5 -> V 17(?)
Classification from images to be posted below. Spiral arms wrap around to east, forming a half-ring (northern arm anti-clockwise, southern one clockwise), hence "pec".

SDSS J134224.69+294947.5
(= "PGC 4382115")

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent/possible companion of
NGC 5275
A magnitude 17.5(?) galaxy (type E?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 24.7, Dec +29 49 48)
Note About PGC Designation: Although HyperLEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object, a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes. The SDSS designation returns a result in both LEDA and NED, hence its use as the main title for this entry.
Physical Information: LEDA E1, U 19.3, B 17.8, I 16.1 -> V 17(?); NED RIDE1 196 Mpc, 17.6g, 3K Vr 13611 km/sec, z 0.04540255
Vr 840 km/sec, so probably a background galaxy

NGC 5276
(= PGC 48542 = UGC 8680 = CGCG 190-043 = MCG +06-30-074)

Discovered (Mar 27, 1856) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type (R')SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 22.0, Dec +35 37 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5276 (= GC 3638, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 36 09, NPD 53 37.8) is "faint, small".
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin? (For now, see NGC 5273's wide-field view)

NGC 5277
(= PGC 48563 = CGCG 161-129)

Discovered (May 23, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 38.4, Dec +29 57 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5277 (Stephan list XII (#53), 1860 RA 13 36 14, NPD 59 20.4) is "extremely faint, small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5278 (with
NGC 5279 = Arp 239)
(= PGC 48473 = UGC 8677 = CGCG 2127-o58: = CGCG 272-003: = MCG +09-22-101)

The colons after the CGCG designations indicate that they refer to both members of Arp 239
Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by William Herschel
Also observed (May 2, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 13 41 39.6, Dec +55 40 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5278 (= GC 3639 = JH 1665 = WH II 798, 1860 RA 13 36 25, NPD 33 37.4), is "pretty faint, round, very small nebula 40 arcsec to east, star to north", the nebula to the east being NGC 5279.
Discovery Note: The GC states that JH 1665 (= NGC 5278 is double or binuclear and extended at 73░, which fits the alignment of NGC 5278 and 5279.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.3 by 1.0 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 5279.
Corwin notes two apparent companions: PGC 48450 at RA 13 41 24.3, Dec +55 38 35
and PGC 48439 at RA 13 41 19.6, Dec +55 40 40

NGC 5279 (with
NGC 5278 = Arp 239)
(= PGC 48482 = UGC 8678 = CGCG 172-058: = CGCG 272-003: = MCG +09-22-102)

The colons after the CGCG designations indicate that they refer to both members of Arp 239
Discovered (May 4, 1831) by John Herschel
Also observed (May 2, 1872) by Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SBa? pec) in Ursa Major (RA 13 41 43.8, Dec +55 40 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5279 (= JH 1665a, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 36 30, NPD 33 37.2) is "faint, very small, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5278.
Discovery Note: Although Dreyer appears to identify William Parsons, the 3rd Lord Rosse, as the later observer, he died in 1867 and could not have made an observation in 1872; so it must have been his son who observed the object, as indicated above (this is probably a typographical error, as Dreyer distinguished the two Rosses by adding an asterisk to "Ld R" if the younger earl was the observer).
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.4 arcmin? Interacting with NGC 5278.
To be added: (For a wide-field image, see NGC 5278)

NGC 5280
(= PGC 48580 = CGCG 161-131 = MCG +05-32-072)

Discovered (May 23, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.6 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 55.5, Dec +29 52 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5280 (Stephan list XII (#54), 1860 RA 13 36 32, NPD 59 25.5) is "faint, very small, round, brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin? 3K Vr 11109 km/sec
A PanSTARRS image suggests that there may be some distortion and discoloration in the outer regions suggestive of an S0/a galaxy, but the region is so far south that PanSTARRS images in the region suffer from a number of image artifacts, so whether the apparent features are real or not is sufficiently uncertain that there is no justification for changing the standard designation as an elliptical galaxy.

PGC 48579
(= MCG +05-32-073)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5280
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 42 53.5, Dec +29 51 28)
Physical Information: LEDA Sbc, U 18.2, B 16.3, I 15.5 -> V (16?); NED mag 15.1 no bandwidth, 3K Vr 13664 km/sec, z 0.045578197409, 2500 km/sec more than NGC 5280, so a background galaxy

NGC 5281
(= OCL 911 = "PGC 3518311")

Discovered (1751) by
Nicolas Lacaille
Also observed (Jul 1, 1826) by James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 5.9 open cluster (type I3m) in Centaurus (RA 13 46 35.0, Dec -62 55 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5281 (= GC 3640 = JH 3531, Lacaille I 7, Dunlop 273, 1860 RA 13 36 55, NPD 152 11.8) is "a cluster, bright, small, pretty compressed, irregularly round, stars from 10th to 12th magnitude". LEDA lists the NGC entry as PGC 3518311, and lists it as an open cluster, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its designation being shown in quotes.
Note About PGC Designation: As for most NGC objects, HyperLEDA assigned a PGC designation for this object, even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 8.0 arcmin? (Corwin 9.5 x 7.3 arcmin)
(The position above is Corwin's estimate for the "core" of the cluster; he lists the "central" position as RA 13 46 23.0, Dec -62 52 54)
DSS image of NGC 5281
Above, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on open cluster NGC 5281

NGC 5282
(= PGC 48614 = UGC 8687 = CGCG 161-133 = MCG +05-32-075)

Discovered (May 22, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.3 lenticular galaxy (type (R')S0/a? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 43 24.9, Dec +30 04 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5282 (Stephan list XII (#55), 1860 RA 13 37 01, NPD 59 13.5) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle equivalent to 14th magnitude star".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.1 by 0.8 arcmin?
Classification based on considerably extended irregular outer regions.

NGC 5283
(= PGC 48425 = UGC 8672 = CGCG 317-006 = MCG +11-17-007)

Discovered (Oct 7, 1866) by
Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0/a?) in Draco (RA 13 41 05.8, Dec +67 40 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5283 (= GC 5750, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 13 37 09, NPD 21 37.3) is "faint, small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin?
Extended outer ring, dust lane suggestive of polar ring galaxy.

NGC 5284
(= "PGC 3518312")

Discovered (Jun 7, 1837) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 9.5(?) open cluster (type ?) in Centaurus (RA 13 47 24.0, Dec -59 08 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5284 (= GC 3641 = JH 3532, 1860 RA 13 37 15, NPD 148 29.4) is "a cluster, large, very rich, stars from 7th to 16th magnitude".
Note About PGC Designation: As usual for NGC objects, Hyper LEDA assigned the object a PGC designation even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 30 by 20 arcmin? Steinicke places the cluster at RA 13 47 06.0, Dec -59 13 39. The position above, which is essentially the one in the HyperLEDA database, is one of two positions given by Corwin (the other is RA 13 46 58.0, Dec -59 07 18). I need to check Corwin's notes, the historical record and the DSS image database before "confirming" any position.

NGC 5285
(= PGC 48688 = CGCG 017-065)

Discovered (Apr 29, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Virgo (RA 13 44 25.8, Dec +02 06 36)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5285 (Stephan list XI (#20), 1860 RA 13 37 19, NPD 87 11.1) is "extremely faint, very small, round, gradually a very little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin?

NGC 5286
(= GCL 26 = PGC 2802652)

Discovered (Apr 29, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 7.4 globular cluster (type V) in Centaurus (RA 13 46 26.8, Dec -51 22 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5286 (= GC 3642 = JH 3533, Dunlop 388, 1860 RA 13 37 38, NPD 140 40.1) is "a globular cluster, very bright, pretty large, round, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars of 15th magnitude".
Note About PGC Designation: As usual for NGC objects, HyperLEDA assigned a PGC designation to this object, even though it isn't a galaxy; but not as usual, a search for that designation returns a result, so it is not shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 11 arcmin?

NGC 5287
(= PGC 48741 = MCG +05-32-079)

Discovered (May 25, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 15.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 44 52.5, Dec +29 46 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5287 (Stephan list XII (#56), 1860 RA 13 38 30, NPD 59 31.4) is "faint, small, irregular, mottled but not resolved?".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin?3K Vr 18782 km/sec

PGC 1877482
Not an NGC object but listed here as a probable companion of
NGC 5287
A magnitude 16(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 44 58.3, Dec +29 46 06)
Physical Information: LEDA E4, U 18.4, B 16.6, I 15.1 -> V 16(?); NED 3K Vr 18789 km/sec, z 0.06267488

NGC 5288
(= OCL 910 = "PGC 3518313")

Discovered (Apr 3, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 open cluster (type II2p) in Circinus (RA 13 48 46.1, Dec -64 41 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5288 (= GC 3643 = JH 3534, 1860 RA 13 38 48, NPD 153 59.3) is "a cluster, small, compressed, irregularly round, stars of 14th magnitude".
Note About PGC Designation: As usual for NGC objects, Hyper LEDA assigned the object a PGC designation even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.0 arcmin?

NGC 5289
(= PGC 48749 = UGC 8699 = CGCG 218-042 = MCG +07-28-058)

Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type (R)S(rs)b?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 45 08.7, Dec +41 30 12)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5289 (= GC 3644 = JH 1666 = WH II 668, 1860 RA 13 39 10, NPD 47 47.6) is "very faint, very small, a little extended 90░▒, suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.9 by 0.6 arcmin?

NGC 5290
(= PGC 48767 = UGC 8700 = CGCG 218-043 = MCG +07-28-061)

Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 45 19.2, Dec +41 42 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5290 (= GC 3645 = WH I 170, 1860 RA 13 39 20, NPD 47 34.5) is "considerably bright, pretty large, extended 90░▒, brighter middle and nucleus".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 3.7 by 1.0 arcmin?

NGC 5291
(= PGC 48893 = ESO 445-030 = MCG -05-33-006)

Discovered (May 8, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.1 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec?) in Centaurus (RA 13 47 24.5, Dec -30 24 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5291 (= GC 3646 = JH 3535, 1860 RA 13 39 26, NPD 119 41.2) is "very faint, round, a very little brighter middle, double star to west".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.2 by 0.8 arcmin?
NED 3K Vr 4648 km/sec, E pec: poss LINER, RIDE 51.4 - 61.9 Mpc

PGC 48894(= MGC -05-33-005)
Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes listed as part of
NGC 5291
and as a probably interacting companion of the NGC object

A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type SAB(s)0/a? pec) in Centaurus (RA 13 47 23.2, Dec -30 25 04)
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.8 by 0.4 arcmin?
NED RIDE1 51.3 Mpc, S0, 3K Vr 4580 km/sec. LEDA B 14.8, K 11.2 -> V (14 to 14.5?). Almost certainly interacting with NGC 5291.

NGC 5292
(= PGC 48909 = ESO 445-031 = MCG -05-33-008)

Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Centaurus (RA 13 47 40.1, Dec -30 56 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5292 (= GC 3647 = JH 3536, 1860 RA 13 39 41, NPD 120 13.2) is "pretty faint, small, round, 2 stars near".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.8 by 1.6 arcmin?

NGC 5293
(= PGC 48854 = UGC 8710 = CGCG 102-057 = MCG +03-35-024)

Discovered (Mar 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 13 46 52.7, Dec +16 16 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5293 (= GC 3648 = WH V 6, 1860 RA 13 39 56, NPD 72 59.2) is "extremely faint, very large, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.8 by 1.5 arcmin?

NGC 5294
(= PGC 48761 = CGCG 271-061 = CGCG 272-006)

Discovered (Apr 14, 1789) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.3 irregular galaxy (type Idm?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 45 18.0, Dec +55 17 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5294 (= GC 3649 = JH 1667 = WH III 785, 1860 RA 13 39 57, NPD 34 00.4) is "extremely faint, 2 stars attached or involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.6 by 0.5 arcmin?
LEDA I, B 15.1, I 14.5 -> V 14.8?; NED 3K Vr 2093 km/sec; considerable clumpiness of star-forming regions throughout central region

NGC 5295
(= PGC 48215 = CGCG 353-023 = MCG +13-10-009)

Discovered (Dec 20, 1797) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Camelopardalis (RA 13 38 39.4, Dec +79 27 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5295 (= GC 3650 = WH III 946, 1860 RA 13 40 21, NPD 09 52.1) is "very faint, very small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin?

NGC 5296
(= PGC 48811 = PGC 48812 = CGCG 218-044 = MCG +07-28-062)

Discovered (May 3, 1850) by
George Stoney
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 46 18.6, Dec +43 51 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5296 (= GC 3651, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 40, NPD 45 28▒) is "round, brighter middle, is southwest of h 1668", (JH) 1668 being NGC 5297.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 0.9 by 0.6 arcmin?
NED 37.8 - 284.0 Mpc (median 88.8), S0+ (= S0/a), starburst, 3K Vr 2424 km/sec

PGC 2230517
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5296
A magnitude 18(?) elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 46 18.2, Dec +43 50 38)
Physical Information: LEDA U 19.1, B 18.2, I 17.2 -> V (17.5 -> 18?); NED 18.0g, 3K Vr 26049 km/sec, so a very distant background galaxy

NGC 5297
(= PGC 48815 = UGC 8709 = CGCG 218-045 = MCG +07-28-003)

Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 46 23.7, Dec +43 52 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5297 (= GC 3652 = JH 1668 = WH I 180, 1860 RA 13 40 32, NPD 45 27.5) is "considerably bright, large, pretty much extended 142░, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size of 5.6 by 1.3 arcmin?

NGC 5298
(= PGC 48985 = ESO 445-039 = MCG -05-33-015)

Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Centaurus (RA 13 48 36.5, Dec -30 25 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5298 (= GC 3653 = JH 3538, 1860 RA 13 40 40, NPD 119 44.4) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle". (Corwin lists a possible alternate identification, PGC 48950 at RA 13 48 11.1, Dec -30 27 07)
Physical Information: Apparent size of 1.4 by 0.6 arcmin?

PGC 717597
(WISEA J134835.65-302441.8)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5298
A magnitude 18(?) irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Centaurus (RA 13 48 35.6, Dec -30 24 42)
Note About PGC Designation: Although a search of HyperLEDA for the PGC designation returns a result, any other reference requires either the coordinates or the WISEA designation to succeed (hence my decision to include that designation).
Physical Information: NED 16.3b, Irr; LEDA "galaxy", B 19.1, I 17.1 -> V 18(?)
Since there is no information about the radial velocity, whether this galaxy is in any way connected to NGC 5298 is completely unknown.

NGC 5299
(= "PGC 5067502")

Discovered (Jun 7, 1837) by
John Herschel
A star cloud in Centaurus (RA 13 50 48.0, Dec -60 24 00)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5299 (= GC 3654 = JH 3537, 1860 RA 13 40 52, NPD 149 14.7) is "a cluster, very large, very rich".
Note About PGC Designation: As usual for NGC objects, HyperLEDA assigned a PGC designation to this object, even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size of 30 arcmin? (The position above is Steinicke's; but the actual position of the star cloud (and for that matter, exactly what part of it Herschel took for his cluster) is very uncertain. Corwin lists it at RA 13 50 32.0, Dec -60 26 18.)
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5200 - 5249) ←NGC Objects: NGC 5250 - 5299→ (NGC 5300 - 5349)