Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5250 - 5299) ←NGC Objects: NGC 5300 - 5349 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ (NGC 5350 - 5399)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
5300, 5301, 5302, 5303, 5304, 5305, 5306, 5307, 5308, 5309, 5310, 5311, 5312, 5313, 5314, 5315, 5316,
5317, 5318, 5319, 5320, 5321, 5322, 5323, 5324, 5325, 5326, 5327, 5328, 5329, 5330, 5331, 5332, 5333,
5334, 5335, 5336, 5337, 5338, 5339, 5340, 5341, 5342, 5343, 5344, 5345, 5346, 5347, 5348, 5349

Page last updated Sept 26, 2021
Added all Dreyer NGC entries (need to check NGC/IC1/IC2 notes, 1912 updates)
Updated "final" Corwin positions, checked "types" as well as could manage
Checked designations, partially updated formatting, added numerous images
WORKING 5309 (a real mess, but almost sorted out now)
Need to check current Steinicke/Gottlieb databases, any appropriate historical references

NGC 5300
(= PGC 48959 = UGC 8727 = CGCG 045-108 = MCG +01-35-038)

Discovered (Feb 2, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 13 48 16.0, Dec +03 57 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5300 (= GC 3655 = JH 1669 = WH II 533, 1860 RA 13 41 10, NPD 85 21.6) is "very faint, very large, a little extended, very gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5300
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5300
Below, a 3 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5300

NGC 5301
(= PGC 48816 = UGC 8711 = CGCG 246-023 = MCG +08-25-041)

Discovered (May 11, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 26, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.7 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)bc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 46 24.7, Dec +46 06 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5301 (= GC 3656 = JH 1670 = WH II 688, 1860 RA 13 41 14, NPD 43 09.4) is "considerably faint, large, very much extended."
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 0.8 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5301
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5301

NGC 5302
(= PGC 49007 = ESO 445-043 = MCG -05-33-018)

Discovered (Mar 30, 1835) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SAB0/a?) in Centaurus (RA 13 48 49.7, Dec -30 30 40)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5302 (= GC 3657 = JH 3539, 1860 RA 13 41 23, NPD 119 47.3) is "faint, small, round, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5302, also showing NGC 5298
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5302, also showing NGC 5298

NGC 5303
(= PGC 48917 = UGC 8725 = CGCG 218-047 = MCG +07-28-067)

Discovered (May 16, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sc? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 47 45.0, Dec +38 18 16)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5303 (= GC 3658 = JH 1672 = WH III 681, 1860 RA 13 41 40, NPD 51 00.3) is "pretty faint, considerably small, a little extended, faint double star involved."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5303, also showing PGC 48920, which is sometimes called NGC 5303B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5303, also showing PGC 48920

PGC 48920
(= CGCG 218-046 = MCG +07-28-066 = "NGC 5303B")

Not an NGC object but listed here because sometimes called NGC 5303B
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sbc? pec) in
Canes Venatici (RA 13 47 45.5, Dec +38 15 33)
Physical Information:
For now, see NGC 5303 for a wide-field image

NGC 5304
(= PGC 49090 = ESO 445-052 = MCG -05-33-022)

Discovered (Apr 10, 1885) by
Lewis Swift (and later listed as NGC 5304)
Also observed (date?) by Herbert Howe (while listed as NGC 5304)
A magnitude 12.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Centaurus (RA 13 50 01.5, Dec -30 34 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5304 (Swift list I (#25), 1860 RA 13 41 45, NPD 119 51.6) is "extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, very faint star following (to the east)." The second IC adds (per Howe) "RA is 13 42 03, the star following is of 12th magnitude, position angle 160 degrees, distance 0.7 arcmin."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5304
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5304

NGC 5305
(= PGC 48930 = UGC 8729 = CGCG 190-057 = MCG +06-30-087)

Discovered (Mar 17, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 47 55.7, Dec +37 49 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5305 (= GC 3659 = JH 1673 = WH III 621, 1860 RA 13 41 51, NPD 51 28.2) is "extremely faint, small, round."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5305
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5305

NGC 5306 =
HCG 67A)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 67)
(= PGC 49039 = MCG -01-35-014)

Discovered (Mar 5, 1785) by William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 binuclear lenticular galaxy (type E/S0? pec) in Virgo (RA 13 49 11.3, Dec -07 13 26)
HCG 67A n1 = (type E?) at RA 13 49 11.2, Dec -07 13 24
HCG 67A n2 = (type S0?) at RA 13 49 11.4, Dec -07 13 28
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5306 (= GC 3660 = JH 1671 = JH 3540 = WH II 306, 1860 RA 13 41 52, NPD 96 31.8) is "very faint, very small, round, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information: The DSS image does not show that this is a pair, and very few references note that fact (though see Bonfanti, Simien et al, 1999; but the PanSTARRS image makes it perfectly clear. Though classified as an E1 galaxy, the paper states that due to the double nucleus, the galaxy's isophotes are those of an E3 galaxy. "n2" is considerably brighter than "n1", but estimating the brightness of each component is going to take additional research. (Hopefully, in the next iteration of this page); 3K Vr 7501 km/sec, z 0.025020665465
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5306, a member of Hickson Compact Group 67
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5306
Below, a 5.0 by 4.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of Hickson Compact Group 67, showing all four members of the group
PanSTARRS image of Hickson Compact Group 67, showing labels for each of its four members
Below, a 2.0 by 2.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy. also showing PGC 49036 and 49040
PanSTARRS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5306, also showing PGC 49036 and PGC 49040, other members of Hickson Compact Group 67
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the double nucleus of NGC 5306
PanSTARRS image of the double nucleus of NGC 5306

PGC 49017 (=
HCG 67B)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 67)
(= MCG -01-35-013)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a companion of NGC 5306
and as a member of Hickson Compact Group 67

A magnitude 14.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Virgo (13 48 59.5, -07 11 42)
Physical Information: LEDA B 15.1, I 12.8 -> V 14 - 14.5, Sb; NED Sb edge-on, RIDE 91.8 - 112 (median 100.3) Mpc, 3K Vr 7877 km/sec, z 0.02627500619
For now, see NGC 5306 for images

PGC 49036 (=
HCG 67D)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 67)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a companion of NGC 5306
and as a member of Hickson Compact Group 67

A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Virgo (13 49 09.7, -07 13 53)
Physical Information: LEDA B 15.8, V 15?; NED S0 pec, 3K Vr 7389 km/sec, z 0.0246466489
For now, see NGC 5306 for images

PGC 49040 (=
HCG 67C)
(A member of Hickson Compact Group 67)
(= MCG -01-35-015)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a companion of NGC 5306
and as a member of Hickson Compact Group 67

A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type Scd? pec) in Virgo (13 49 12.3, -07 12 33)
Physical Information: A very strange spiral galaxy, with its nucleus offset to the northwest of the rest of the galaxy.
LED B 15.7, I 14.5 -> V 15(?); NED Scd, 3K Vr 7817 km/sec, z 0.02607501155685
For now, see NGC 5306 for images

NGC 5307 (= P-K 312+10.1 = "PGC 3517771")
Discovered (Apr 15, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.2 planetary nebula in Centaurus (RA 13 51 03.3, Dec -51 12 21)
Northern lobe is at RA 13 51 03.0, Dec -51 12 14
Southern lobe at RA 13 51 03.1, Dec -51 12 25
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5307 (= GC 3661 = JH 3541, 1860 RA 13 42 12, NPD 140 30.6) is "a planetary nebula, or a very faint, extremely small double nebula". The position precesses to RA 13 51 05.4, Dec -51 12 24, only a third of an arcmin from the center of the nebula listed above, the description fits perfectly and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
PGC Designation Note: As for most NGC objects, LEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object, even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation doesn't return a result, so the designation is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Like all planetary nebulae, NGC 5307 is the result of a red giant blowing away part of its outer layers before it collapses to become a white dwarf (the star in the center of the nebula). The object is thought to be about 10 thousand light years away (from the 2019 HST press release; the 2007 press release gave an estimated distance of 7900 light years). Given that and its apparent size of 0.42 by 0.38 arcmin for the fainter outer region and of about 0.31 by 0.22 arcmin for the brighter inner region (from the images below), the outer part of the nebula is about 1.2 light years across, while the brighter inner region is about 0.9 light years across. Many planetary nebulae have more than one "halo", with the older, fainter ones having been ejected earlier, and are fainter than the inner ones because they are both further from the white dwarf that is lighting them up, and their mass is more spread out (and often less massive, as well). But over a period of a few thousand to a couple of tens of thousands of years, as the white dwarf cools and becomes fainter and the gases surrounding it spread into space, the entire nebula will fade out of visible existence.
DSS image of region near planetary nebula NGC 5307
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5307
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide DSS image of the planetary nebula
DSS image of planetary nebula NGC 5307
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide 2007 HST image of NGC 5307
(Image Credit NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA); originally potw0733, but no longer in HST archive)
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 5307
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide 2019 image of the nebula (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, R. Wade et al.)
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 5307

NGC 5308
(= PGC 48860 = UGC 8722 = CGCG 295-012 = MCG +10-20-029)

Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.4 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 47 00.4, Dec +60 58 23)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5308 (= GC 3662 = JH 1674 = WH I 255, 1860 RA 13 42 21, NPD 28 19.3) is "bright, pretty large, much extended 57°, pretty suddenly brighter middle and bright extended nucleus."
Physical Information: 3K Vr 2098 km/sec
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5308
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5308

PGC 48851
(= MCG +10-20-030)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5308
A magnitude ? elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 47 11.3, Dec +60 58 38)
Physical Information: LEDA E/S0; NED 17.3g, 3K Vr 10699 km/sec, z 0.035689578639, so a distant bakground galaxy, and not an atual companion

PGC 2802348
(= SDSS J134646.16+605912.1)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a possible companion of
NGC 5308
A magnitude 17(?) irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 46 46.2, Dec +60 59 12)
Physical Information: LEDA B 17.0, I 16.0 -> V 17?; NED 16.8g, 3K 1830 km/sec, so quite possibly an actual companion of NGC 5308

NGC 5309
(probably = PGC 908764)

Recorded (Apr 27, 1887) by
Edward Swift
Perhaps a lost or nonexistent object in Virgo (RA 13 49 56.4, Dec -15 46 15), or
A magnitude 15.2(?) spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB(sr)b?) in Virgo (RA 13 50 10.8, Dec -15 37 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5309 (Swift list VI (#60), 1860 RA 13 42 23, NPD 105 04.4) is "very faint, pretty small, round, between a star and a double star." The position precesses to RA 13 49 56.4, Dec -15 46 15 (whence the position of the lost or nonexistent "object" above), but there is nothing there nor anywhere near there. However, per Corwin, all the other nebulae found by Edward (3, besides this one) on the night in question had an error of 18 seconds of time in the right ascension (presumably due to a clock error), and if this observation had the same error in RA and Edward made a single-digit error in recording the declination (putting it 10 arcmin too far south), then his position would be 1860 RA 13 42 41, Dec -14 54.4, which precesses to 2000 RA 13 50 14.2, Dec -15 36 13, only about 1.2 arcmin northeast of the galaxy listed above, which in the absence of any other problems, would be considered adequate for a certain identification.
 Unfortunately, the note for this object in Swift's paper states that the nebula lies "between a star and a coarse double star following (to the east)," and there are no truly suitable candidates for such a pairing. However, per a private communication from Corwin, Edward might have "reversed" the field (a common problem with visual observations not only in the past, but even in the present), in which case the single star could be the one about 3.2 southeast of the galaxy, and the double the pair about 4.2 arcmin west-southwest of the galaxy in the 12 arcmin wide image, which is a reasonable representation of what the central region would look like in the very wide field of view used by Swift (though of course not nearly as bright visually as in the photograph). So to summarize, the identification of the galaxy listed above as NGC 5309 rests on three common errors, at least one of which (the 18 second error in the clock time) seems certain, and the other two at least possible. This means that the identification cannot be considered certain, but it is at least a reasonable possibility, so I have treated it as if it were certain.
Discovery Note: At one time Steinicke proposed a candidate somewhat closer to Swift's position (given Corwin's list of positions, probably PGC 3093844), but per Corwin, that object is almost certainly too faint for either of the Swifts to have seen, and as a result, Steinicke (and many other references) now lists NGC 5309 as lost or nonexistent.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 12120 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 908764 is about 565 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 535 to 540 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 550 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.5 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 85 to 90 thousand light-years across.
Classification Note: The "type" was provided by Corwin, but with uncertainty about whether the final item should be "b" or "bc", hence my question mark. The (R') refers to the "pseudo-ring" formed by the broad, patchy outer spiral arms.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 908764, which is probably NGC 5309
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 908764, which is probably NGC 5309
The star and double star probably reversed by Swift are circled
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galay
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy PGC 908764, which is probably NGC 5309

PGC 3093844 (almost certainly not =
NGC 5309)
Almost certainly not an NGC object but listed here because once thought to be a candidate for NGC 5309
A magnitude 16(?) galaxy (type SAB0?) in Virgo (RA 13 49 52.9, Dec -15 41 37)
Reason For This Entry: Apparently this galaxy was once one of various candidates suggested as what Edward Swift observed, and became NGC 5309; and although it appears that the suggestion has been withdrawn, this entry serves as a warning against any reference that still lists it as a possible candidate for the NGC object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 11875 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 3093844 is about 550 to 555 million light-years away, in reasonable agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 585 to 590 million light-years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 525 to 530 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 535 to 540 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 75 to 80 thousand light-years across.
PanSTARRS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 3093844, which is occasionally misidentified as NGC 5309
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on PGC 3093844, also showing PGC 908764, the probable NGC 5309
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 3093844, which is occasionally misidentified as NGC 5309

NGC 5310
(= "PGC 5067682")

Recorded (Apr 30, 1859) by
Sidney Coolidge
A magnitude 13.1 star in Virgo (RA 13 49 47.7, Dec +00 04 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5310 (= GC 5073, S. Coolidge (#17, HN 19), 1860 RA 13 42 38, NPD 89 14.0) is "a 12th magnitude star in a faint nebula."
Note About PGC Designation: As usual for NGC objects, HyperLEDA assigned a PGC designation for this object, even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near the star listed as NGC 5310
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the star listed as NGC 5310

NGC 5311
(= PGC 49011 = UGC 8735 = CGCG 218-052 = MCG +07-28-072)

Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 lenticular galaxy (type (R)S(r)0/a pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 48 56.1, Dec +39 59 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5311 (= GC 3663 = JH 1675 = WH II 710, 1860 RA 13 42 58, NPD 49 19.1) is "considerably faint, considerably small, round, suddenly brighter middle, preceding (western) of 2," the other being NGC 5313.
Physical Information: A complex galaxy, with both nuclear and outer dust-filled rings, and an extended spherical outer region. Its extremely bright core is a blazar, a type of quasar in which one of two opposing polar jets created by material falling into a supermassive black hole happens to be pointing more or less in our direction.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5311
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered NGC 5311
Below, a 4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy (to be replaced with a closer view)
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5311

NGC 5312
(= PGC 49075 = CGCG 190-061 = MCG +06-30-092)

Discovered (May 2, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 49 50.6, Dec +33 37 18)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5312 (= GC 3664 = JH 1676 = WH III 422, 1860 RA 13 43 38, NPD 55 41.2) is "very faint, round, stellar, 1st of 4," the others being NGC 5318, 5319 and 5321.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5312
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered NGC 5312

NGC 5313
(= PGC 49069 = UGC 8744 = CGCG 218-054 = MCG +07-28-074)

Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 49 44.3, Dec +39 59 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5313 (= GC 3665 = JH 1677 = WH II 711, 1860 RA 13 43 45, NPD 49 19.6) is "pretty bright, pretty small, very little extended, gradually a little brighter middle, following (eastern) of 2," the other being NGC 5311.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5313
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered NGC 5313

NGC 5314
(= PGC 48810 = CGCG 336-017 = MCG +12-13-009)

Discovered (Apr 8, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 46 11.4, Dec +70 20 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5314 (Swift list III (#74), 1860 RA 13 43 52, NPD 18 58.2) is "very faint, extremely small, stellar, extremely faint star very close."
Physical Information:
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5314
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered NGC 5314

NGC 5315
(= P-K 309-04.2 = "PGC 3517772")

Discovered (May 4, 1883) by
Ralph Copeland
A magnitude 9.8 planetary nebula in Circinus (RA 13 53 57.0, Dec -66 30 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5315 (Copeland, 1860 RA 13 44 02, NPD 155 50) is "a planetary nebula, stellar, = magnitude 10.5."
PGC Designation Note: As for most NGC objects, LEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation doesn't return a result, so the designation is shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.23 arcmin?
HST image of planetary nebula NGC 5315
Above, a ? arcmin wide image of NGC 5315 (Image Credit Howard Bond (STScI) and NASA/ESA)

NGC 5316
(= OCL 913 = "PGC 3518314")

Discovered (May 25, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 6.0 open cluster (type III1p) in Centaurus (RA 13 54 01.0, Dec -61 51 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5316 (= GC 3666 = JH 3542, Dunlop #282, 1860 RA 13 44 07, NPD 151 09.7) is "a cluster, pretty large, pretty concentrated, stars of magnitude 11."
PGC Designation Note: As for most NGC objects, LEDA assigns a PGC designation to this object even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation doesn't return a result, so the designation is shown in quotes.
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5316
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered NGC 5316

NGC 5317 (=
NGC 5364)
(PGC 49555 = UGC 8853 = CGCG 046-009 = MCG +01-36-003)

Discovered (Feb 2, 1786) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5364)
Also observed (Apr 10, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5364)
Also observed (Apr 14, 1852) by Bindon Stoney (and later listed as NGC 5364)
Discovered (Apr 7, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5317)
A magnitude 10.5 spiral galaxy (type SA(rs)bc pec) in Virgo (RA 13 56 12.0, Dec +05 00 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5317 (= GC 3667 = JH 1678, 1860 RA 13 44 08, NPD 84 18.5) is "very faint, very large, round, very gradually brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 13 51 10.4, Dec +04 59 48, but there is nothing there nor near there. Fortunately, per Corwin, the solution to the identification of NGC 5317 is simple. John Herschel only observed his JH 1678 on one night, and on that night he failed to see his JH 1705, or NGC 5364 (which he observed 3 nights later, but without finding his previous "discovery"). The description of both objects is the same, and the difference in the positions obtained by Herschel for the two objects is almost exactly 5 minutes of time due east-west, so Herschel probably made some blunder in the recording or reduction of his observation of Apr 7, 1828, which gave the appearance of having discovered a different object; but in reality, NGC 5317 is almost certainly a duplicate observation of NGC 5364.
Physical Information: Given the duplicate entry, see NGC 5364 for anything else.

NGC 5318
(= PGC 49139 = UGC 8751 = CGCG 190-063 = MCG +06-30-096)

Discovered (May 2, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 50 36.0, Dec +33 42 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5318 (= GC 3668 = JH 1679 = WH III 423, 1860 RA 13 44 24, NPD 55 36.1) is "faint, small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 2nd of 4," the others being NGC 5312, 5319 and 5321.
Physical Information: 3K Vr 4518 km/sec
PanSTARRS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5318, also showing NGC 5319 and NGC 5321
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered NGC 5318, also showing NGC 5319 and 5321
(PGC 49124 is also shown, because it is often misidentified as NGC 5319)

PGC 49124 (not =
NGC 5319)
(= MCG +06-30-095)

Not an NGC object but listed here because often misidentified as NGC 5319
and as an apparent (but not actual) companion of NGC 5318

A manitude 15.5(?) spiral galaxy (type SABc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 50 34.0, Dec +33 44 09)
Physical Information: LEDA B 15.6, I 15.3 -> V 15.5(?); NED 3K 12992 km/sec, z 0.0433378396, so a distant background galaxy.
For now, see the image at NGC 5318

PGC 49125
(= MCG +06-30-097)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a probable companion of
NGC 5318
A magnitude 16.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Canes Venatici (13 50 34.7, +33 43 06)
Physical Information: LEDA Sa, B 16.9, I 15.6 -> V 16.5?; NED nil; since no Vr is available, whether this is an actual companion of NGC 5318 is uncertain; but NED states that this is a double system with 5318, with a faint bridge between them, and if that is real as it appears to be, and not just an accidental apparent connection, then PGC 49125 must be at the same distance as NGC 5318.

NGC 5319
(= PGC 84061)

Discovered (Mar 27, 1856) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 15.5 spiral galaxy (type SB?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 50 40.7, Dec +33 45 42)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5319 (3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 44 25, NPD 55 30) is "very faint, round, north of III 423, 3rd of 4," the others being 5312, 5319 and 5321, and (WH) III 423 being NGC 5318.
Discovery Note: Although Dreyer credits William Parsons, the 3rd Earl of Rosse, as the discoverer, a note at the beginning of the NGC states that most of "his" discoveries were made by one of his assistants, in this case, as shown above, by R. J. Mitchell.
Misidentification As PGC 49124: Several references misidentify NGC 5319 as PGC 49124, but that object is discussed above as an apparent (but not actual) companion of NGC 5318.
Physical Information:
For now, see the image at NGC 5318

NGC 5320
(= PGC 49112 = UGC 8749 = CGCG 218-056 = CGCG 219-001 = MCG +07-28-076)

Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.1 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 50 20.4, Dec +41 21 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5320 (= GC 3669 = JH 1682 = WH II 669, 1860 RA 13 44 27, NPD 47 56.2) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, gradually brighter middle."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5320
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered NGC 5320

NGC 5321
(= PGC 49148 = CGCG 190-065 = MCG +06-30-101)

Discovered (Apr 29, 1827) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 50 43.7, Dec +33 37 57)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5321 (= GC 3670 = JH 1680, 1860 RA 13 44 29, NPD 55 39.67) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round, suddenly very much brighter middle similar to a star, 4th of 4," the others being NGC 5312, 5318 and 5319.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5321, also showing NGC 5318
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered NGC 5321, also showing NGC 5318

NGC 5322
(= PGC 49044 = UGC 8745 = CGCG 295-017 = MCG +10-20-035)

Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 10.2 elliptical galaxy (type E3-4) in Ursa Major (RA 13 49 15.2, Dec +60 11 26)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5322 (= GC 3671 = JH 1684 = WH I 256, 1860 RA 13 44 34, NPD 29 06.8) is "very bright, pretty large, irregularly round, pretty suddenly much brighter middle."
Physical Information: Apparent size 6.0 by 4.1 arcmin.
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 5322 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type E3-4.
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5322
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5322
Below, a 7 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of elliptical galaxy NGC 5322

NGC 5323
(= PGC 48785 = UGC 8719 = CGCG 353-025 = MCG +13-10-012)

Discovered (Dec 20, 1797) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 45 36.6, Dec +76 49 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5323 (= GC 3672 = JH 1689 = WH II 899, 1860 RA 13 44 39, NPD 12 28.4) is "very faint, pretty small, a litle extended 0°±."
Physical Information: NED 3K Vr 2001 km/sec
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5323
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5323
Below, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the same region
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5323

PGC 214153
(= 2MASXJ13452926+7649040)

Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5323
A magnitude 17(?) spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 45 29.2, Dec +76 49 05)
Physical Information: LEDA B 17.5 (V 17?); NED 3K Vr 22844 km/sec, z 0.076196717, so only a very distant background galaxy (classification difficult because of its distance)

NGC 5324 (perhaps =
IC 4407?)
(= PGC 49236 = MCG -01-35-016)

Discovered (Mar 5, 1785) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5324)
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5324)
Perhaps recorded (Sep 20, 1883) by William Finlay (and later listed as IC 4407)
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Virgo (RA 13 52 05.9, Dec -06 03 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5324 (= GC 3673 = JH 1681 = WH II 307, 1860 RA 13 44 44, NPD 95 21.2) is "considerably faint, large, irregularly round, brighter middle."
Possible Duplicate Entry: See IC 4407 for a discussion of the possible duplicate entry; per Gottlieb, Finlay's observation was in Dec 1886.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.3 by 2.1 arcmin?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5324
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5324
*PanSTARRS image of same region to be added*
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image also available

NGC 5325
(= PGC 49163 = CGCG 218-062 = CGCG 219-007 = MCG +07-28-080)

Discovered (Jun 14, 1885) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 15.3 spiral galaxy (type SBcd?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 50 54.2, Dec +38 16 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5325 (Swift list II (#36), 1860 RA 13 44 45, NPD 51 01.2) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, round, very difficult, 2 bright stars near."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5325
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5325

PGC 49151
(= PGC 49152 = MCG +06-30-103 = MCG +07-28-081 = "NGC 5325B")

Not an NGC object but listed here because often called NGC 5325B
A magnitude 16.1 spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in
Canes Venatici (RA 13 50 52.9, Dec +38 14 25)

NGC 5326
(= PGC 49157 = UGC 8764 = CGCG 218-061 = CGCG 219-006 = MCG +07-28-082)

Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.9 spiral galaxy (type Sab?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 50 50.7, Dec +39 34 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5326 (= GC 3674 = JH 1685 = WH II 712, 1860 RA 13 44 51, NPD 49 44.1) is "considerably faint, small, very little extended, suddenly brighter middle."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5326
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5326

NGC 5327
(= PGC 49234 = UGC 8768 = CGCG 017-078 = MCG +00-35-021)

Discovered (Apr 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Virgo (RA 13 52 04.2, Dec -02 12 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5327 (= GC 3675 = JH 1683 = WH II 685, 1860 RA 13 44 52, NPD 91 30.5) is "faint, pretty small, round, 2 stars preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5327
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5327

NGC 5328
(= PGC 49307 = ESO 445-067 = MCG -05-33-028)

Discovered (May 5, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 11.6 elliptical galaxy (type E1?) in Hydra (RA 13 52 53.3, Dec -28 29 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5328 (= GC 3676 = JH 3543 = WH III 923, 1860 RA 13 44 56, NPD 117 46.9) is "pretty bright, small, round, suddenly a little brighter middle."
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5328, also showing NGC 5330
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5328, also showing NGC 5330

PGC 740594
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5328
A magnitude ? lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 13 52 53.9, Dec -28 31 42)
Physical Information: LEDA E, NED S0, not obvious in images

PGC 740807
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5328
A magnitude ? lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 13 52 38.5, Dec -28 30 45)
Physical Information: type from NED; not as obvious in images

PGC 3094715
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5328
A magnitude ? lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Hydra (RA 13 53 00.2, Dec -28 27 06)
Physical Information:

PGC 3094716
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5328
A magnitude ? lenticular galaxy (type SAB0?) in Hydra (RA 13 52 48.4, Dec -28 29 58)
Physical Information:

NGC 5329
(= PGC 49248 = UGC 8771 = CGCG 045-121 = MCG +01-35-044)

Discovered (Apr 30, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Virgo (RA 13 52 10.1, Dec +02 19 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5329 (= GC 3677 = JH 1686 = WH III 549, 1860 RA 13 45 05, NPD 86 58.4) is "faint, very small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5329
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5329

PGC 49256
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5329
A magnitude ? spiral galaxy (type S(r)a?) in Virgo (RA 13 52 14.6, Dec +02 21 34)
Physical Information:

PGC 49270
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5329
A magnitude ? spiral galaxy (type SB(r)a?) in Virgo (RA 13 52 22.8, Dec +02 20 45)
Physical Information:

PGC 214169
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5329
A magnitude ? elliptical galaxy (type E?) in Virgo (RA 13 52 11.6, Dec +02 18 55)
Physical Information:

NGC 5330
(= PGC 49316 = PGC 741288 = ESO 445-068 = MCG -05-33-028A)

Discovered (Mar 25, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.7 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Hydra (RA 13 52 59.2, Dec -28 28 15)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5330 (Swift list VI (#61), 1860 RA 13 45 05, NPD 117 46.9) is "most extremely faint, small, round, very difficult, north-following (to the northeast of) 3676," (GC) 3676 being NGC 5328.
Physical Information:
For now, see the image of NGC 5328

NGC 5331
(= "PGC 3167735" = UGC 8774 = CGCG 017-082 = MCG +00-35-022)
The designations above refer to the pair of galaxies; those below, to the individual galaxies)
(= PGC 49264 (= PGC 3120490) + PGC 49266))
Discovered (May 13, 1793) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A pair of galaxies in Virgo (RA 13 52 16.3, Dec +02 06 18)
PGC 49264 = A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type SABb? pec) at RA 13 52 16.2, Dec +02 06 05
PGC 49266 = A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) at RA 13 52 16.4, Dec +02 06 31
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5331 (= GC 3678 = JH 1687 = WH III 929, 1860 RA 13 45 08, NPD 87 12.3) is "very faint, small, extended 0°, partially resolved (some stars seen)."
Note About PGC Designations: As for most NGC objects, HyperLEDA assigned a PGC designation for this pair of galaxies; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes. A search for the designations for the individual galaxies does return a result, so they are not in quotes.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near the interacting pair of spiral galaxies listed as NGC 5331
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the interacting pair of spiral galaxies listed as NGC 5331

NGC 5332
(= PGC 49243 = UGC 8773 = CGCG 102-070 = MCG +03-35-030)

Discovered (Mar 23, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.0 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 13 52 07.9, Dec +16 58 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5332 (Swift list VI (#62), 1860 RA 13 45 28, NPD 72 19.9) is "very faint, small, round."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5332
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5332

NGC 5333
(= PGC 49424 = PGC 184230 = ESO 221-017)

Discovered (Jul 2, 1834) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 10.7 lenticular galaxy (type SB(r)0/a?) in Centaurus (RA 13 54 24.2, Dec -48 30 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5333 (= GC 3679 = JH 3544, 1860 RA 13 45 40, NPD 137 48.6) is "very faint, very small, round, 8th magnitude star following (to the east)."
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5333
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5333
*Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image available here*

NGC 5334 (=
IC 4338)
(= PGC 49308 = PGC 159510 = UGC 8790 = CGCG 017-088 = MCG +00-35-024)

Discovered (Apr 15, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5334)
Discovered (Apr 20, 1897) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4338)
A magnitude 11.3 spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in Virgo (RA 13 52 54.5, Dec -01 06 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5334 (= GC 3680 = WH III 665, 1860 RA 13 45 45, NPD 90 25.5) is "considerably faint, very large, round, a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved."
Physical Information:
Use By The de Vaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 5334 is used by the de Vaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type SB(rs)cd.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5334
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5334

NGC 5335
(= PGC 49310 = UGC 8791 = GCG 045-129 = MCG +01-35-046)

Discovered (Apr 9, 1828) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc) in Virgo (RA 13 52 56.6, Dec +02 48 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5335 (= GC 3681 = JH 1688, 1860 RA 13 45 50, NPD 86 29.0) is "faint, irregularly round."
Physical Information: A strikingly sharp bar and ring form the center of this diffuse spiral galaxy. Apparent size about 2.2 by 1.65 arcmin (from the image below).
Below, a 2.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 5335
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5335

NGC 5336
(= PGC 49250 = UGC 8785 = CGCG 218-066 = CGCG 219-011 = MCG +07-29-003)

Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 52 09.8, Dec +43 14 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5336 (= GC 3682 = JH 1690 = WH II 670, 1860 RA 13 46 20, NPD 49 03.9) is "considerably faint, pretty large, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5336
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5336

NGC 5337
(= PGC 49275 = UGC 8789 = CGCG 219-012 = MCG +07-29-004)

Discovered (Jan 14, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 52 23.0, Dec +39 41 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5337 (= GC 3683 = JH 1691 = WH III 698, 1860 RA 13 46 26, NPD 49 37.6) is "very faint, small, irregularly round, 7th magnitude star preceding (to the west)."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5337
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5337; the glare at right is from magnitude 7.5 star HD 120950

NGC 5338
(= PGC 49353 = UGC 8800 = CGCG 045-132 = MCG +01-35-048)

Discovered (May 3, 1877) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A magnitude 12.8 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0/a?) in Virgo (RA 13 53 26.6, Dec +05 12 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5338 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 46 36, NPD 84 04) is "very faint, extended preceding-following (west-east), double star 4 arcmin following (to the east)."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5338
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5338

NGC 5339
(= PGC 49388 (= MCG -01-35-018)

Discovered (May 14, 1887) by
Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.1 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Virgo (RA 13 54 00.3, Dec -07 55 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5339 (Bigourdan (list II #70), 1860 RA 13 46 38, NPD 97 14) is "very faint, pretty small, round."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5339
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5339

NGC 5340
(= PGC 49021 = CGCG 336-022 = MCG +12-13-014)

Discovered (May 6, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.7 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 49 00.1, Dec +72 39 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5340 (Swift list III (#75), 1860 RA 13 46 38, NPD 16 40.0) is "extremely faint, small, round."
Physical Information:
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5340
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5340
Below, a PanSTARRS image of the same region (better resolution but some image artifacts)
PanSTARRS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5340

NGC 5341
(= PGC 49285 = UGC 8792 = CGCG 190-069 = CGCG 191-002 = MCG +06-31-002)

Discovered (Mar 24, 1857) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 13.3 spiral galaxy (type SBbc? pec) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 52 32.0, Dec +37 49 03)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5341 (= GC 3690, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 46 40, NPD 51 33) is "a little extended, brighter middle, south-preceding (southwest of) h 1697," (JH) 1697 being NGC 5351.
Discovery Note: Although Dreyer credits William Parsons, the 3rd Earl of Rosse, as the discoverer, a note at the beginning of the NGC states that most of "his" discoveries were made by one of his assistants, in this case, as shown above, by R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5341
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5341
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5341

NGC 5342
(= PGC 49192 = UGC 8776 = CGCG 295-020 = MCG +10-20-041)

Discovered (Mar 19, 1790) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Ursa Major (RA 13 51 25.8, Dec +59 51 50)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5342 (= GC 3684 = JH 1694 = WH III 849, 1860 RA 13 46 44, NPD 29 25.9) is "extremely faint, very small."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5342
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5342

NGC 5343
(= PGC 49412 = MCG -01-35-019)

Discovered (Mar 5, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Virgo (RA 13 54 11.7, Dec -07 35 17)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5343 (= GC 3685 = JH 1692 = WH II 308, 1860 RA 13 46 51, NPD 96 54.2) is "very faint, small, round, a little brighter middle."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5343
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5343

NGC 5344
(= PGC 49085 = CGCG 336-026)

Discovered (May 6, 1886) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.5 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 50 12.1, Dec +73 57 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5344 (Swift list III (#76), 1860 RA 13 46 58, NPD 15 23.0) is "very faint, small, round."
Physical Information: NED 3K Vr 9056 km/sec, z 0.030207748
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5344
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5344

PGC 2759080
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5344
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 50 02.3, Dec +73 57 01)
Physical Information: LEDA B 17.2 (V 16.5?); NED 3K Vr 12184 km/sec, z 0.0406430879; obviously a background galaxy not actually associated with NGC 5344

J135015.7+735655
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5344
A magnitude ? galaxy (type E??) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 50 15.7, Dec +73 56 55)
Physical Information: Nothing in either LEDA or NED, and no indication of whether a galaxy or a faint star in any database; however, its fuzzy appearance suggests that it is a galaxy, and its reddish color matches the fact that it is an infrared source, so it is probably a very distant galaxy. It is even possible that despite looking like a reddish "twin" of the object to its southeast, it might be such a distant object that it is reddened by an extremely large recessional velocity, in which case the pair's similar appearance may be mere coincidence.

J135016.5+735647
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5344
A magnitude 19.0 whitish object (type E?) in Ursa Minor (RA 13 50 16.5, Dec +73 56 47)
Physical Information: nothing in either LEDA or NED, and no indication of whether a galaxy or a faint star in any database

NGC 5345
(= PGC 49415 = UGC 8820 = CGCG 017-094 = MCG +00-35-026)

Discovered (Apr 15, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Virgo (RA 13 54 14.3, Dec -01 26 11)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 3686 = JH 1693 = WH II 686, 1860 RA 13 47 02, NPD 90 44.6) is "faint, small, round, brighter middle."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5345
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5345

NGC 5346
(= PGC 49322 = UGC 8804 = CGCG 219-014 = MCG +07-29-007)

Discovered (May 18, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 01.9, Dec +39 34 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5346 (Stephan list XII (b#57), 1860 RA 13 47 04, NPD 49 43.7) is "extremely faint, pretty large, irregularly round, gradually a little brighter middle, mottled but not resolved?"
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5346
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5346

NGC 5347
(= PGC 49342 = UGC 8805 = CGCG 191-007 = MCG +06-31-007)

Discovered (May 2, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (date?) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.6 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 17.8, Dec +33 29 27)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5347 (= GC 3687 = JH 1695 = WH II 424, 1860 RA 13 47 07, NPD 55 49.5) is "pretty faint, considerably large, round, a little brighter middle."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5347
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5347

NGC 5348
(= PGC 49411 = UGC 8821 = CGCG 045-137 = MCG +01-35-051)

Discovered (May 3, 1877) by
Lawrence Parsons, 4th Lord Rosse
A mangitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Virgo (RA 13 54 11.3, Dec +05 13 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5348 (4th Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 47 16, NPD 84 03) is "very faint, much extended north-south."
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5348
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5348

NGC 5349
(= PGC 49336 = UGC 8803 = CGCG 190-072 = CGCG 191-006 = MCG +06-31-005)

Discovered (Mar 24, 1857) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type SBd? SBb?) in Canes Venatici (RA 13 53 13.1, Dec +37 52 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5349 (= GC 3691, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 13 47 16, NPD 51 26) has "a brighter middle, south-preceding (southwest of) 1697," (JH) 1697 being NGC 5351.
Discovery Note: Although Dreyer credits William Parsons, the 3rd Earl of Rosse, as the discoverer, a note at the beginning of the NGC states that most of "his" discoveries were made by one of his assistants, in this case, as shown above, by R. J. Mitchell.
Physical Information:
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5349
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5349, also showing NGC 5351
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5349
Below, a ? arcmin wide image of the region between NGC 5349 and NGC 5351
(Image Credit Teresa Hawes and Philip Darling/Adam Block/NOAO/AURA/NSF)
NOAO image of region between NGC 5349 and 5351
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5250 - 5299) ←NGC Objects: NGC 5300 - 5349→ (NGC 5350 - 5399)