Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5850 - 5899) ←NGC Objects: NGC 5900 - 5949→ (NGC 5950 - 5999)
Click here for Introductory Material
QuickLinks:
5900, 5901, 5902, 5903, 5904, 5905, 5906, 5907, 5908, 5909, 5910, 5911, 5912, 5913, 5914, 5915, 5916,
5917, 5918, 5919, 5920, 5921, 5922, 5923, 5924, 5925, 5926, 5927, 5928, 5929, 5930, 5931, 5932, 5933,
5934, 5935, 5936, 5937, 5938, 5939, 5940, 5941, 5942, 5943, 5944, 5945, 5946, 5947, 5948, 5949

Last updated Apr 5, 2022
WORKING on HCG 76; checked Dreyer/NED/LEDA/Corwin pos. 5940-44
ALSO WORKING 5905+: Corwin positions, alternate designations
Last prior update Dec 30, 2017; probably need to recheck almost all references for updates
Checked updated Corwin positions, Steinicke physical database & all historical references
WORKING: Re-check Dreyer NGC/IC entries
WORKING: Reformatting to current standards
WORKING: Add basic pix, tags

NGC 5900
(= PGC 54431 = PGC 2194384 = UGC 9790 = CGCG 221-044 = MCG +07-31-046)

Discovered (Apr 9, 1787) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 14.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 15 05.1, Dec +42 12 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5900 (= GC 4078 = JH 1915 = WH III 660, 1860 RA 15 10 03, NPD 47 16.8) is "very faint, small, very little extended, gradually brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.7 by 0.5 arcmin
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5900
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5900
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5900

NGC 5901
(= "PGC 5067684")

Recorded (May 23, 1854) by
R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 15.6 star in Bo÷tes (RA 15 15 02.3, Dec +42 13 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5901 (= GC 4079, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 10 03, NPD 47 16▒) is "close north of h 1915, extremely faint, small", (JH) 1915 being NGC 5900.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case R. J. Mitchell.
Note About PGC Designation: As is true for most NGC objects, HyperLEDA assigned a PGC designation to this object even though it isn't a galaxy; but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, so it is shown in quotes.

NGC 5902
(= PGC 54394 = CGCG 274-035 = MCG +08-28-011)

Discovered (May 1, 1788) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 14 22.4, Dec +50 19 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5902 (= GC 4080 = WH III 737, 1860 RA 15 10 15, NPD 39 12.1) is "very faint, very small, stellar".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 1.0 arcmin
LEDA S0/a, 3K Vr 11149 km/sec

2MASS J15142334+5019555
Not an NGC object but listed here as an apparent companion of
NGC 5902
A magnitude 20(?) elliptical galaxy (type E2?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 14 23.3, Dec +50 19 56)
Physical Information: Although suggested as an apparent companion by Corwin, almost nothing is known about this object except that it is a galaxy either behind or in front of the northeastern part of NGC 5902 (there is also a bluish object to the north-northwest of the nucleus of NGC 5902, but that is a star in our own galaxy).

NGC 5903
(= PGC 54646 = UGCA 405 = ESO 514-004 = MCG -04-36-008)

Discovered (May 21, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (May 13, 1834) by John Herschel
Also observed (July, 1895?) by Vincenzo Cerulli
A magnitude 11.2 elliptical galaxy (type E3?) in Libra (RA 15 18 36.5, Dec -24 04 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5903 (= GC 4081 = JH 3598 = WH III 139, (Cerulli AN 3315), 1860 RA 15 10 24, NPD 113 31.1) is "considerably faint, small, round, gradually pretty much brighter middle". The position precesses to RA 15 18 36.1, Dec -24 02 01, less than 2 arcmin nearly due north of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and the only comparable galaxy in the region is accounted for by NGC 5898, so the identification is certain.
Discovery Notes: There is an oddity here, in that Cerulli observed and corrected the positions for NGC 5309 and 5898, and Dreyer listed Cerulli's corrected position for NGC 5898 in the IC2, but did not mention the one for NGC 5903 (which is why Cerulli's name is in parentheses in the NGC entry above). If he had, the 1860 position for NGC 5903 would have been RA 15 10 25, Dec -23 33.1, which precesses to (2000) RA 15 18 37.3, Dec -24 04 01, well within the outline of the galaxy listed above. But there is no way of knowing why Dreyer used one of Cerulli's corrections and not the other, and the identification is certain even without that correction; so it is merely a historical footnote.
Physical Information: Apparent size of about 2.7 by 2.0 arcmin (from the images below).
DSS image of region near elliptical galaxy NGC 5903
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on NGC 5903, also showing NGC 5898
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of NGC 5903
DSS image of  elliptical galaxy NGC 5903
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of the nucleus of elliptical galaxy NGC 5903
Below, a 3.6 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey; used by permission)
Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey image of  elliptical galaxy NGC 5903

NGC 5904 (=
M5)
(= PGC 2802656 = GCL 34)

Discovered (May 5, 1702) by Gottfried Kirch
Recorded (May 23, 1764) by Charles Messier as M5
Also observed (Apr 13, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 5.7 globular cluster (type V) in Serpens (RA 15 18 33.4, Dec +02 04 53)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5904 (= GC 4083 = JH 1916, G. Kirch, M 5, 1860 RA 15 11 28, NPD 87 24.3) is "a very remarkable object, a globular cluster, very bright, large, extremely compressed middle, stars from 11th to 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: One of the most massive globular clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy
SDSS image of globular cluster NGC 5904, also known as M5
Above, a 24 arcmin wide view of M5
Below, a closeup of the globular cluster (Credit and ©: Jim Misti, Misti Mountain Observatory; used by permission)
Misti Mountain Observatory image of globular cluster NGC 5904, also known as M5

NGC 5905 (= PGC 54445)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 9, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 11.7 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Draco (RA 15 15 23.4, Dec +55 31 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5905 (= GC 4082 = GC 4084 = WH II 758, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 11 40, NPD 33 57.9) is "pretty faint, pretty small, irregularly round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 4.0 by 2.6 arcmin

NGC 5906 (= the fainter western part of
NGC 5907)
Recorded (Apr 13, 1850) by George Stoney
A magnitude 14.5 part of a spiral galaxy in Draco (RA 15 15 52.2, Dec +56 19 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5906 (= GC 4086, 3rd Lord Rosse, 1860 RA 15 12 15, NPD 33 10▒) is "A ray, very much extended, parallel to h 1917 and close to the west of it", (JH) 1917 being NGC 5907.
Discovery Notes: Although Dreyer credits the discovery to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, he notes that many of Rosse's nebular discoveries were actually made by one of his assistants, in this case George Stoney.
Physical Information: This is merely part of spiral galaxy NGC 5907 (which see for images). It is undoubtedly the fainter western portion of the galaxy that is obscured by dust in the galaxy's disc, while NGC 5907 would originally have been the brighter eastern portion of the galaxy, but is now considered to be the entire galaxy.

NGC 5907 (= PGC 54470), the Knife Edge Galaxy
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Nov 18, 1829) by John Herschel
Also observed (Apr 13, 1850) by George Stoney
A magnitude 10.3 spiral galaxy (type SA(s)c?) in Draco (RA 15 15 53.7, Dec +56 19 44)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5907 (= GC 4087 = JH 1917 = WH II 759, 1860 RA 15 12 16, NPD 33 09.3) is "considerably bright, very large, very much extended 155░, very gradually then pretty suddenly brighter middle and nucleus". The position precesses to RA 15 15 53.8, Dec +56 19 43, essentially dead center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Designation Note: GC 4087 = NGC 5907 represents the entire galaxy, but apparently what we see as the brighter eastern part of the nucleus and disc of the galaxy was interpreted by George Stoney as a separate object from the fainter western portion, which therefore became NGC 5906, but is only the part of the galaxy that is partially obscured by dust in its disk.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 730 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5907 is about 30 to 35 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 30 to 65 million light years (the HST press release uses a "median" distance of 50 million light years). Given its apparent size of about 11.6 by 0.95 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 115 thousand light years across if the Hubble Flow distance is correct, and about 165 to 170 thousand light years across if the HST press release distance is correct. The smaller size is more typical of such galaxies, but there are spirals of substantially larger size, so either number could be correct.
Classification Note: Since the galaxy is almost exactly edge-on, although its thick dust lanes make its spiral nature certain, they make determining the exact type of spiral more difficult. That is estimated more from the size (or in this case lack of size) of the nuclear bulge.
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5907
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 5907
(Image Credit & © Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/U. of Arizona, data courtesy Don McCrady; used by permission)
Below, a labeled version of the image; NGC 5907 is the entire galaxy
NGC 5906 is the fainter western region obscured by dust in the galaxy's disk
Labeled version of Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5907, showing that the western portion of the galaxy obscured by dust in its disk is presumably NGC 5906
Below, a 1.75 by 4.25 arcmin wide image of the central part of the galaxy (North is up and to the left)
(Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, R. de Jong; Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt); post-processing Courtney Seligman
HST image of central part of spiral galaxy NGC 5907

NGC 5908 (= PGC 54522)
Discovered (May 5, 1788) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Oct 9, 1863) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Draco (RA 15 16 43.2, Dec +55 24 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5908 (= GC 4085 = GC 4088 = WH II 760, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 13 00, NPD 34 04.1) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.3 by 1.4 arcmin

NGC 5909 (= PGC 54223)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1797) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 11 28.2, Dec +75 23 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5909 (= GC 4089 = WH III 943, 1860 RA 15 13 11, NPD 14 07.1) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5910 (= PGC 54689 =
HCG 74A)
Discovered (Apr 13, 1785) by William Herschel
A magnitude 13.6 galaxy (type E/S0?) in Serpens (RA 15 19 24.7, Dec +20 53 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5910 (= GC 4090 = WH II 400, 1860 RA 15 13 16, NPD 68 36.9) is "very faint, small, extremely mottled but not resolved".
Discovery Notes: The description "extremely mottled but not resolved" suggests that although Herschel could not have seen the brighter galaxies as separate objects, the fact that they are separate objects may have affected his perception of their appearance; so it is possible that NGC 5910 should include one or more of the fainter components..
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin?
SDSS image of region near ? galaxy NGC 5910, the brightest member of Hickson Compact Group 74
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5910
Below, a 3 arcmin wide image of Hickson Compact Group 74
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 74
Below, a labeled image of the group
Labeled SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 74
Below, a ? arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 5910
(placeholder)
Corwin lists four companions (all members of Hickson Compact Group 74)
PGC 54688 = HCG 74B magnitude 15.2 (type E+E?) at RA 15 19 24.3, Dec +20 53 27
PGC 54692 =HCG 74C at RA 15 19 25.8, Dec +20 53 58
PGC 54697 = HCG 74D at RA 15 19 31.8, Dec +20 53 01
PGC 54694 = HCG 74E at RA 15 19 27.8, Dec +20 54 32

NGC 5911 (= PGC 54731)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Serpens (RA 15 20 18.2, Dec +03 31 06)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5911 (Stephan list XI (#12), 1860 RA 15 13 18, NPD 85 58.3) is "very faint, very small, 2 small stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 54734) at RA 15 20 22.9, Dec +03 32 06

NGC 5912 (= PGC 54237)
Discovered (Dec 12, 1797) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 13.8 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 11 41.0, Dec +75 23 05)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5912 (= GC 4091 = WH III 944, 1860 RA 15 13 36, NPD 14 07.1) is "very faint, very small".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 5913 (= PGC 54761)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 15, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBa?) in Serpens (RA 15 20 55.4, Dec -02 34 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5913 (= GC 4092 = JH 1918 = JH 3599 = WH III 374, 1860 RA 15 13 39, NPD 92 04.0) is "very faint, pretty large, very little extended, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.7 arcmin

NGC 5914 (= PGC 54654)
Discovered (May 16, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 18 43.8, Dec +41 51 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5914 (Stephan list XII (#71), 1860 RA 15 13 41, NPD 47 37.4) is "faint, very small, round, faint star involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.85 by 0.35 arcmin. Vr 5410 km/sec.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5914, also showing PGC 54653 and PGC 2188560
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5914, also showing PGC 54653 and 2188560
Below, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5914

PGC 54653 (= "NGC 5914B1")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5914B1

A magnitude 16.0 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 18 45.3, Dec +41 53 27)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.7 arcmin. Nothing known about distance or actual size. In any event, almost certainly completely unrelated to NGC 5914, save by its inappropriate designation as NGC 5914B1.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 54653 and PGC 2188560, sometimes referred to as NGC 5914B
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 54653 and 2188560; for a wide-field image see NGC 5914

PGC 2188560 (= "NGC 5914B2")
Not an NGC object, but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5914B2
A magnitude 15.7 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Bo÷tes (RA 15 18 46.1, Dec +41 53 11)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.1 arcmin. Sometimes called, by those who foolishly designate PGC 54653 as NGC 5914B, a part of that object; but almost certainly a much more distant object, completely unrelated to any of the other "nearby" galaxies. Vr = 22645 km/sec, z = 0.075536, indicating that it is at least four times more distant than NGC 5914, and probably twice the distance PGC 54653.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies PGC 54653 and PGC 2188560, sometimes referred to as NGC 5914B
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 54653 and 2188560; for a wide-field image see NGC 5914

NGC 5915 (= PGC 54816)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Libra (RA 15 21 33.1, Dec -13 05 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5915 (= GC 4093 = JH 3600, 1860 RA 15 13 51, NPD 102 35.1) is "bright, small, round, gradually a little brighter middle, western of 2", the other being NGC 5916.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 1.1 arcmin

NGC 5916 (= PGC 54825)
Discovered (Jun 5, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type SBa? pec) in Libra (RA 15 21 37.9, Dec -13 10 10)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5916 (= GC 4094 = JH 3601, 1860 RA 15 13 56, NPD 102 39.2) is "faint, small, a little extended, gradually a little brighter middle, eastern of 2", the other being NGC 5915.
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 0.9 arcmin

PGC 54779 (= "NGC 5916A")
Not an NGC object but listed here since sometimes called NGC 5916A
A magnitude 14.4 spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in
Libra (RA 15 21 13.8, Dec -13 06 02)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 5917 (= PGC 54809 =
Arp 254)
Discovered (Jul 16, 1835) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Libra (RA 15 21 32.6, Dec -07 22 38)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5917 (= GC 4095 = JH 3602, 1860 RA 15 14 03, NPD 96 51.1) is "extremely faint, very small, pretty suddenly brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.6 by 0.9 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 54817) at RA 15 21 33.3, Dec -07 26 52

NGC 5918 (= PGC 54690)
Discovered (Apr 26, 1830) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 13.2 spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 19 25.3, Dec +45 52 49)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5918 (= GC 4096 = JH 1920, 1860 RA 15 14 37, NPD 43 36.7) is "considerably faint, large, pretty much extended, gradually a little brighter middle, double star to south".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 0.8 arcmin

NGC 5919 (= PGC 54826)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 15.9 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Serpens (RA 15 21 36.9, Dec +07 43 09)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5919 (Swift list VI (#77), 1860 RA 15 14 37, NPD 81 46.8) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5920.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin
Corwin lists an apparent companion
(SDSSJ152139.25+074316.6 = "PGC 3845108") at RA 15 21 39.3, Dec +07 43 17
and another (SDSS J152136.43+074330.0 = "PGC 3845092") at RA 15 21 36.4, Dec +07 43 30
and another (SDSS J152136.19+074237.0 = "PGC 3845089") at RA 15 21 36.2, Dec +07 42 37

NGC 5920 (= PGC 54839)
Discovered (Mar 30, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.6 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Serpens (RA 15 21 51.9, Dec +07 42 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5920 (Swift list VI (#78), 1860 RA 15 14 59, NPD 81 47.3) is "most extremely faint, pretty small, a little extended, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5919.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.1 by 0.6 arcmin

NGC 5921
(= PGC 54849 = UGC 9824 = CGCG 049-146 = MCG +01-39-021)

Discovered (May 1, 1786) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Apr 10, 1828) by John Herschel
Also observed (Jul 1848 to Aug 1850) by George Johnstone Stoney
Also observed (Apr 17, 1855) by R. J. Mitchell
A magnitude 10.8 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)bc) in Serpens (RA 15 21 56.5, Dec +05 04 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5921 (= GC 4097 = JH 1919 = WH I 148, 1860 RA 15 15 00, NPD 84 25.6) is "considerably bright, considerably large, irregularly round, very suddenly brighter middle like 12th magnitude star, among stars". The position precesses to RA 15 21 57.0, Dec +05 04 06, essentially dead-center on the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing comparable nearby, so the identification is certain.
Observation Note: Gottlieb notes that Mitchell wrote "suspect spiral like an 'S'. Mr Johnstone Stoney saw the north-preceding (northwestern) branch with considerable certainty, the south-following (southeastern) one not so sure."
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1645 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), NGC 5921 is about 75 to 80 million light-years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 30 to 85 million light-years (the HST press release uses a value of about 80 million light-years). Given that and its apparent size of about 4.8 by 4.2 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 105 to 110 thousand light-years across.
Use By The deVaucouleurs Atlas: NGC 5921 is used by The deVaucouleurs Atlas of Galaxies as an example of type SB(rs)bc. The designation (rs) means that there is an obvious central ring, but with spiral arms reaching into the bar and becoming part of the ring (which led to the HST press release's titular "Serpentine Spiral Galaxy", though that is also an obvious pun about its being in the constellation of Serpens).
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5921
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5921
Below, a 5.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5921
Below, a 1.4 by 1.7 arcmin wide HST image of part of the galaxy (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Walsh; Acknowledgement R. Colombari)
HST image of part of spiral galaxy NGC 5921
Below, a 0.8 by 1.2 arcmin wide HST image of the bar and nucleus of the galaxy (Image Credit as above)
HST image of the bar and nucleus of spiral galaxy NGC 5921

WORKING HERE: Sort out mess with discovery of NGC 5922/23
NGC 5922 (probably =
NGC 5923 = PGC 54780)
Recorded (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5923)
Also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5923)
Recorded (May 6, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5922)
Previously identified as a pair of stars in Bo÷tes (RA 15 21 08.9, Dec +41 40 18)
but probably a magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 21 14.2, Dec +41 43 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5922 (= GC 4098 = JH 1922 = WH III 661, 1860 RA 15 16 12, NPD 47 50.5) is "extremely faint, small". Per Corwin's Nov 2015 update, this is probably not a pair of stars, but a duplication of NGC 5923; but further discussion will have to wait for the next iteration of this page.
Discovery Notes: Steinicke lists WH as the sole discoverer of 5923, and JH as the sole discoverer of 5922. NEED TO INVESTIGATE THIS REVERSAL OF CREDIT.

WORKING HERE: Sort out mess with discovey of NGC 5922/23

NGC 5923 (= PGC 54780 (and probably =
NGC 5922))
Recorded (Apr 9, 1787) by William Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5923)
Also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5923)
Also observed (May 6, 1828) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5922)
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 21 14.2, Dec +41 43 33)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5923 (= GC 4099 = JH 1921, 1860 RA 15 16 13, NPD 47 46.5) is "very faint, pretty large, very little extended, very gradually brighter middle". See NGC 5922 for a brief mention of the probable duplicate entry (AND CONFUSION ABOUT WHO OBSERVED WHAT, WHEN); but further discussion will have to wait for the next iteration of this page.
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.8 by 1.8 arcmin

NGC 5924 (= PGC 54850)
Discovered (Jun 10, 1882) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.6 spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in Corona Borealis (RA 15 22 02.0, Dec +31 13 59)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5924 (Stephan list XII (#72), 1860 RA 15 16 20, NPD 58 15.7) is a "nebulous star, very faint, small, faint star close to south"
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.3 arcmin

NGC 5925 (= OCL 938)
Discovered (Jul 28, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 8, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.4 open cluster (type III1m) in Norma (RA 15 27 28.0, Dec -54 32 30)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5925 (= GC 4100 = JH 3603, Dunlop 357, 1860 RA 15 17 15, NPD 144 01.7) is a "cluster, very large, very rich, a little compressed, stars from 11th to 14th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 20 arcmin

NGC 5926 (= PGC 54950)
Discovered (Jun 15, 1884) by
Lewis Swift
Not observed (May 2, 1889) by Guillaume Bigourdan
Also observed (Jan to Jun 1898) by Herbert Howe
A magnitude 13.6 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Serpens (RA 15 23 24.9, Dec -12 42 56)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5926 (Swift list I (#44), 1860 RA 15 17 19, NPD 76 46.3) is "faint, very small, 2 stars near". The first IC adds "Not found by Bigourdan". The second IC lists a corrected RA (per Howe) of 15 16 47 (which explains Bigourdan's failure to find the object).
Physical Information: Apparent size 12.6 by 0.8 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 54946) at RA 15 23 22.1, Dec +12 41 33

NGC 5927 (= GCL 35)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by
James Dunlop
Also observed (Jul 7, 1834) by John Herschel
A magnitude 8.0 globular cluster (type VIII) in Lupus (RA 15 28 00.5, Dec -50 40 19)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5927 (= GC 4101 = JH 3604, Dunlop 389, 1860 RA 15 17 56, NPD 140 10.8) is a "globular cluster, considerably bright, large, round, very gradually brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of 15th magnitude".
Physical Information: Apparent size 6 arcmin

NGC 5928 (= PGC 55072)
Discovered (May 24, 1791) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 17, 1831) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Serpens (RA 15 26 02.9, Dec +18 04 25)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5928 (= GC 4102 = JH 1923 = WH II 874, 1860 RA 15 19 41, NPD 71 25.5) is "pretty bright, considerably small, round, pretty suddenly brighter middle, 7th magnitude star to north".
Discovery Notes: The first IC adds "This possibly Messier 102, found by MÚchain: 'NÚbuleuse entre les Útoiles ο du Bouvier (= Bo÷tes) et ι du Dragon: elle est trŔs foible; prŔs d'elle est une Útoile de la sixiŔme grandeur.' I assume that ι Draconis is an error for ι Serpentis". (Dreyer's supposition was wrong; M102 is actually NGC 5866.)
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.6 arcmin

NGC 5929 (= PGC 55076, and with
NGC 5930 = Arp 90)
Discovered (May 13, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 26 06.2, Dec +41 40 14)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5929 (= GC 4103 = JH 1924, 1860 RA 15 21 06, NPD 47 50.5) is "very faint, very small, southwestern member of double nebula", the other being NGC 5930.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5929 and 5930, also known as Arp 90
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5929 and 5930
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5929 and 5930, also known as Arp 90

NGC 5930 (= PGC 55080, and with
NGC 5929 = Arp 90)
Discovered (Mar 18, 1787) by William Herschel
Also observed (May 1, 1828) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.2 spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 26 08.0, Dec +41 40 34)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5930 (= GC 4104 = JH 1925 = WH II 651, 1860 RA 15 21 09, NPD 47 50.3) is "pretty faint, pretty small, round, northeastern member of double nebula", the other being NGC 5929 (which see for images of the pair).
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.8 arcmin.

NGC 5931 (= PGC 55233)
Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
Also observed (May 15, 1890) by Edward Barnard
A magnitude 14.0 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Serpens (RA 15 29 29.6, Dec +07 34 24)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5931 (Swift list VI (#81), 1860 RA 15 22 32, NPD 81 57.0) is "extremely faint, pretty large, round".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.0 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5932 (= PGC 55109)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.3 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 26 48.2, Dec +48 36 54)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5932 (Swift list VI (#79), 1860 RA 15 22 34, NPD 40 50.0) is "very faint, pretty small, round, northwestern of 2", the other being NGC 5933.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5932 and lenticular galaxy 5933
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5932 and NGC 5933
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 5932
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5932

NGC 5933 (= PGC 55117)
Discovered (Apr 21, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 27 01.6, Dec +48 36 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5933 (Swift list VI (#80), 1860 RA 15 22 44, NPD 40 51.0) is "most extremely faint, very small, round, southeastern of 2", the other being NGC 5932.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.5 by 0.2 arcmin.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5933
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5933; for a wide-field view, see NGC 5932
Corwin lists an apparent companion (SDSS J152700.13+483628.9 = PGC 2321397) at RA 15 27 00.1, Dec +48 36 29

NGC 5934 (= PGC 55178)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.9 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 28 12.8, Dec +42 55 48)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5934 (Stephan list XI (#13), 1860 RA 15 23 20, NPD 46 35.0) is "faint, small, irregular, a little extended north-south, 2 small stars involved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.3 by 0.6 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxies NGC 5934 and 5935
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5934 and 5935
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxies NGC 5934 and 5935

NGC 5935 (= PGC 55183)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type S?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 28 16.7, Dec +42 56 39)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5935 (Stephan list XI (#14), 1860 RA 15 23 24, NPD 46 34.1) is a "13th or 14th magnitude star which seems slightly nebulous".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.7 by 0.3 arcmin. See NGC 5934 for images of the pair.

NGC 5936 (= PGC 55255)
Discovered (Apr 12, 1784) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Jun 1, 1866) by Truman Safford
Also observed (Apr 30, 1865) by Heinrich d'Arrest
A magnitude 12.5 spiral galaxy (type SBb?) in Serpens (RA 15 30 00.8, Dec +12 59 22)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5936 (= GC 4105 = WH II 130, d'Arrest, 1860 RA 15 23 25, NPD 76 31.6) is "faint, pretty large, irregularly round, very gradually brighter middle, mottled but not resolved".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.4 by 1.3 arcmin

NGC 5937 (= PGC 55281)
Discovered (Apr 14, 1785) by
William Herschel
Also observed (Mar 26, 1830) by John Herschel
A magnitude 12.3 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in Serpens (RA 15 30 46.1, Dec -02 49 46)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 4106 (= JH 1926 = JH 3606 = WH II 401, 1860 RA 15 23 29, NPD 92 20.8) is "pretty bright, pretty small, round, very gradually brighter middle, 3 stars to east".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.9 by 1.1 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion ("GALEXASC J153042.55-024850.2" = PGC1082207) at RA 15 30 42.5, Dec -02 48 56

NGC 5938 (= PGC 55582)
Discovered (Jun 9, 1836) by
John Herschel
A magnitude 11.8 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Triangulum Australe (RA 15 36 26.2, Dec -66 51 35)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5938 (= GC 4107 = JH 3605, 1860 RA 15 23 30, NPD 156 22.6) is "faint, small, among stars".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.8 by 2.5 arcmin
Corwin lists a possible companion (PGC 2793206) at RA 15 36 21.4, Dec -66 52 58
(See Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey for image of 5938 and PGC 2793206)

NGC 5939 (= PGC 55022)
Discovered (Jul 11, 1883) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Ursa Minor (RA 15 24 46.0, Dec +68 43 51)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5939 (Swift list I (#45), 1860 RA 15 23 51, NPD 20 46.5) is "pretty bright, pretty small, a little extended".
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.9 by 0.5 arcmin

NGC 5940
(= PGC 55295 = UGC 9876 = CGCG 050-007 = MCG +01-39-025)

Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by
Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.4 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Serpens (RA 15 31 18.1, Dec +07 27 28)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5940 (Swift list VI (#82), 1860 RA 15 24 27, NPD 82 03.0) is "extremely faint, pretty small, round, faint star preceding (to west), 1st of 4," the others being NGC 5941, 5942 and 5944. The position precesses to RA 15 31 17.3, Dec +07 28 11, about 0.7 arcmin north-northwest of the galaxy listed above, the description fits and there is nothing else nearby, so the identification is certain.
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.8 by 0.8 arcmin
LEDA Sab, Sy1, B 14.5, I 13.2, V 14.9(??); NED SBab, Sy1, .8 x .8 arcmin, 14.1g, 3K Vr 10366 km/sec, z 0.0345770069

WORKING HERE (HCG 76)

NGC 5941 (probably =
HCG 76B)
(= PGC 55314 = CGCG 050-011 = MCG +01-40-003)
(a member of Hickson Compact Group 76)

Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by Lewis Swift
Also observed (Apr 30, 1889) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 13.9 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Serpens (RA 15 31 40.2, Dec +07 20 20)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5941 (Swift list VI (#83), 1860 RA 15 24 37, NPD 82 10.0) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 2nd of 4," the others being NGC 5940, 5942 and 5944. The first IC adds (per Bigourdan) that 5941 and 5942 are south-preceding and north-following each other.
Discovery Notes: Bigourdan's "Big Book" places 5941 to the east of of 5942, making it the 3rd of 4, which has led to considerable confusion in the modern literature about which of the three brighter galaxies in the region are 5941 and 5942, with some references listing the southwestern member of the pair as NGC 5941, and others listing it as NGC 5942, and of course the same confusion applies to the northeastern member. The tentative assignment here is based on observations and analyses of the situation by Corwin and Gottlieb, who point out that Swift listed 5941 as the brighter of the pair, and if correct, the galaxy listed above is 5941, not the one to its southwest.
Note About PGC Designation: Although the PGC designation for this object is correct, LEDA shows the wrong NGC designation for this galaxy due to the confusion involving the modern literature mentioned in the previous paragraph. (It lists NGC 5941 as NGC 5942.)
Physical Information: Based on the analysis shown in the entry for NGC 5944, Hickson Compact Group 76 is about 460 to 465 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.55 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below), NGC 5941 is about ? thousand light-years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy NGC 5941, also showing NGC 5942 and NGC 5944
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 5941, also showin NGC 5942 and 5944
Below, a 6 arcmin wide SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 76
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 76
Below, the image above with HCG labels
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 76, showing HCG labels
Below, the image above with NGC/PGC designations, per the identifications on this page
SDSS image of Hickson Compact Group 76, showing presumably accurate NGC and PGC designations
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 5941, also showing PGC 55313
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 5941, also showing PGC 55313

PGC 55313 (=
"HCG 76F")
(a member of Hickson Compact Group 76)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a member of HCG 76 and a companion of NGC 5941
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a? pec) in Serpens (RA 15 31 39.5, Dec +07 20 09)
Physical Information: Based on the analysis shown in the entry for NGC 5944, Hickson Compact Group 76 is about 460 to 465 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.16 by 0.06 arcmin (from the image below), PGC 55313 is about ? thousand light-years across.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 55313, also showing part of NGC 5941
Above, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 55313, also showing part of NGC 5941 (which see)

PGC 55307 (=
"HCG 76G")
(a member of Hickson Compact Group 76)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a member of HCG 76 and a companion of NGC 5941
A magnitude 17(?) spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in Serpens (RA 15 31 36.0, Dec +07 21 00)
Physical Information: Based on the analysis shown in the entry for NGC 5944, Hickson Compact Group 76 is about 460 to 465 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), PGC 55307 is about ? thousand light-years across.

NGC 5942 (probably =
HCG 76C)
(= PGC 55309 = CGCG 050-009 = MCG +01-40-001)
(a member of Hickson Compact Group 76)

Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by Lewis Swift
Also observed (Apr 30, 1889) by Guillaume Bigourdan
A magnitude 14.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Serpens (RA 15 31 36.8, Dec +07 18 45)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5942 (Swift list VI (#84), 1860 RA 15 24 42, NPD 82 13.0) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 3rd of 4," the others being NGC 5940, 5941 and 5944. The first IC adds (per Bigourdan) that 5941 and 5942 are south-preceding and north-following each other.
Discovery Notes: Bigourdan's "Big Book" places 5942 to the west of of 5941, making it the 2nd of 4, which has led to considerable confusion in the modern literature about which of the three brighter galaxies in the region are 5941 and 5942, with some references listing the southwestern member of the pair as NGC 5941, and others listing it as NGC 5942, and of course the same confusion applies to the northeastern member. The tentative assignment here is based on observations and analyses of the situation by Corwin and Gottlieb, who point out that Swift listed 5941 as the brighter of the pair, and if correct, the galaxy listed above is 5942, not the one to its northeast.
Note About PGC Designation: Although the PGC designation for this object is correct, LEDA shows the wrong NGC designation for this galaxy due to the confusion involving the modern literature mentioned in the previous paragraph. (It lists PGC 55316 as NGC 5942, but that galaxy is not an NGC object, at all.)
Physical Information: Based on the analysis shown in the entry for NGC 5944, Hickson Compact Group 76 is about 460 to 465 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), NGC 5942 is about ? thousand light-years across.

PGC 55316 (not =
NGC 5942, but probably HCG 76D)
(= CGCG 050-010 = MCG +01-40-002)
(a member of Hickson Compact Group 76)

Not an NGC object but listed here because a member of HCG 76 and sometimes misidentified as NGC 5942
A magnitude 15.5(?) elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Serpens (RA 15 31 42.2, Dec +07 17 15)
Physical Information: Based on the analysis shown in the entry for NGC 5944, Hickson Compact Group 76 is about 460 to 465 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), PGC 55316 is about ? thousand light-years across.

NGC 5943
(= PGC 55242 = UGC 9870 = CGCG 222-016 = MCG +07-32-016)

Discovered (Jun 18, 1884) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.2 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 29 44.1, Dec +42 46 41)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5943 (Stephan list XIII (#82), 1860 RA 15 24 51, NPD 46 44.5) is "very faint, pretty small, difficult."
Physical Information:
LEDA B 14.45, I 12.40, V 13.5(?), S0; NED S0?, 3K Vr 5867 km/sec

NGC 5944 (=
HCG 76A)
(= PGC 55321 = CGCG 050-013 = MCG +01-40-004)
(a member of Hickson Compact Group 76)

Discovered (Apr 19, 1887) by Lewis Swift
A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Serpens (RA 15 31 47.6, Dec +07 18 29)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5944 (Swift list VI (#85), 1860 RA 15 24 52, NPD 82 12.2) is "most extremely faint, small, round, 4th of 4," the others being NGC 5940, 5941 and 5942.
Physical Information: For a group of galaxies, the best estimate of its distance is presumably made using recessional velocities and redshift-independent distance estimates for all of the galaxies. For HCG 76, the redshifts (relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background, in km/sec) for galaxies "A" through "G" are (as shown on the Hickson Compact Galaxy page) 10270, 10150, 10685, 10390, 10505, 10570 and 10010, yielding an average of about 10370 km/sec. Based on that (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that HCG 76 is about 480 to 485 million light-years away, in fair agreement with a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 425 to 430 million light-years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the cluster was about 460 to 465 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 470 to 475 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), NGC 5944 is about ? thousand light-years across.

PGC 55325 (=
HCG 76E)
(a member of Hickson Compact Group 76)

Not an NGC object but listed here as a member of HCG 76 and a companion of NGC 5944
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0?) in Serpens (RA 15 31 50.2, Dec +07 18 42)
Physical Information: Based on the analysis shown in the entry for NGC 5944, Hickson Compact Group 76 is about 460 to 465 million light-years away. Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), PGC 55325 is about ? thousand light-years across.

NGC 5945 (= PGC 55243)
Discovered (Jun 12, 1880) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 12.8 spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 29 45.0, Dec +42 55 07)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5945 (Stephan list XI (#15), 1860 RA 15 24 53, NPD 46 35.7) is "pretty faint, pretty large, gradually much brighter middle, small star attached on northwest".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.9 by 1.8 arcmin

NGC 5946 (=
IC 4550 = GCL 36)
Discovered (May 8, 1826) by James Dunlop (and later listed as NGC 5946)
Independently discovered (Jul 7, 1834) by John Herschel (and later listed as NGC 5946)
Discovered (May 24, 1898) by Lewis Swift (and later listed as IC 4550)
A magnitude 8.4 globular cluster (type IX) in Norma (RA 15 35 28.5, Dec -50 39 32)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5946 (= GC 4108 = JH 3607, (Dunlop) 1860 RA 15 25 20, NPD 140 11.2) is a "globular cluster, considerably bright, pretty large, round, very gradually a little brighter middle, well resolved, clearly consisting of stars, stars of 16th magnitude".
Discovery Notes: (Per Corwin) Glen Cozen (who has done exhaustive examinations of Dunlop's original observing log and reductions) found "about a dozen objects" that were not in Dunlop's published papers, and this is one of them; hence Dunlop's inclusion (in parentheses) in the NGC entry, and the credit for the discovery shown above.
Physical Information: Apparent size 3.0 arcmin

NGC 5947 (= PGC 55274)
Discovered (Jun 18, 1884) by
╔douard Stephan
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type SBbc?) in Bo÷tes (RA 15 30 36.6, Dec +42 43 02)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5947 (Stephan list XIII (#83), 1860 RA 15 25 44, NPD 46 48.3) is "very faint, small, diffuse".
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.2 by 1.2 arcmin

NGC 5948
Recorded (Jun 14, 1881) by
╔douard Stephan
A pair of stars in Serpens (RA 15 32 58.6, Dec +03 58 58)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5948 (Stephan list XII (#73), 1860 RA 15 25 59, NPD 85 32.4) is a "faint star in very faint nebulosity, very faint star close".

NGC 5949 (= PGC 55165)
Discovered (Nov 28, 1801) by
William Herschel
A magnitude 12.0 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Draco (RA 15 28 00.7, Dec +64 45 47)
Historical Identification: Per Dreyer, NGC 5949 (= GC 4109 = WH II 906, 1860 RA 15 26 03, NPD 24 45.5) is "faint, small, a little extended 45░▒, very gradually a little brighter middle".
Physical Information: Apparent size 2.2 by 1.0 arcmin
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 5949
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of NGC 5949
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 5949
Celestial Atlas
(NGC 5850 - 5899) ←NGC Objects: NGC 5900 - 5949→ (NGC 5950 - 5999)