Celestial Atlas
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Page last updated Sep 13, 2021
Added a comment to the entry for PGC 382
WORKING PGC 175

PGC 1
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Pisces (RA 23 59 58.8, Dec +00 42 06)
Based on a recessional velocity of 23985 km/sec, a straightforward calculation yields a distance for PGC 1 of about 1.05 billion light years. However, at that distance we need to take the expansion of the Universe into account, as during the billion-plus years it took the light by which we see the galaxy to reach us, the space between us and it has expanded by about 80 million light years. As a result, it was only about 975 million light years away when it emitted that light. Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.4 arcmins, PGC 1 is about 90 thousand light years across. As shown in the image below, the galaxy appears to be paired with SDSS J235958.29+004208.6, a 16th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) at RA 23 59 58.3, Dec +00 42 09. The latter galaxy has a recessional velocity of 22755 km/sec and and an apparent size of 0.4 by 0.3 arcmin. The difference in recessional velocity for the two galaxies corresponds to 55 million light years difference in distance, so they may not be a physical pair; but in comparison to any uncertainty in their distance, they are at essentially the same distance from us, so the apparently smaller galaxy is also physically smaller, at about 70 thousand light years across.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 1
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 1 and its optical companion
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 1

PGC 2
A 13th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)b) in
Andromeda (RA 00 00 01.7, Dec +47 16 28)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5015 km/sec, PGC 2 is about 225 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 2.1 by 1.8 arcmins, it is about 130 thousand light years across. PGC 2 is listed as a member of Local Galaxy Group 485, which also contains PGC 676 and IC 1525. IC 1525 is also listed as a member of WBL729, a group with an average recessional velocity of about 5020 km/sec which also includes PGC 18 and 73195; so all five galaxies may be physically related. PGC 2, 18 and 73195 and IC 1525 (which see for a wide-field view of the four galaxies) are less than 30 arcmin apart, and if at nearly the same distance from us, may be within a region less than two million light years across; but PGC 676 is quite a bit further away, being about 2 1/2 degrees east of the other group members.
Wikisky image of PGC 2
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 2
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 2

PGC 3
A 15th-magnitude galaxy (type Irr S?) in
Cetus (RA 00 00 03.2, Dec -18 00 30)
Based on a recessional velocity of 8955 km/sec, PGC 3 is about 400 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.25 arcmins, it is about 70 thousand light years across. (Note: NED does not recognize PGC 3; search for MGC-03-01-012, instead.)
Wikisky image of PGC 3
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 3; the "bright" star is 9th-magnitude HD 224703
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 3

PGC 4
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in
Cetus (RA 00 00 03.5, Dec +23 05 15)
Based on a recessional velocity of 4460 km/sec, PGC 4 is about 200 million light years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of 180 to 215 million light years. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.2 arcmins, it is about 50 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of PGC 4
>Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 4
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 4

PGC 5 (=
IC 5370)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Andromeda (RA 00 00 09.1, Dec +32 44 20)

PGC 6
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 00 02.1, Dec +15 52 54)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6000 km/sec, PGC 6 is about 270 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.45 by 0.3 arcmins, it is about 35 thousand light years across.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 6
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 6
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 6

PGC 7
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 04.4, Dec -00 05 00)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7395 km/sec, PGC 7 is about 330 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.5 arcmins, it is about 50 thousand light years across. Listed by I. D. Karachentsev as a member (with PGC 10) of pair KPG 600.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 7
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 7; also shown is the background galaxy 1152096
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is its presumed companion, PGC 10
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 7 and 10

PGC 8
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Octans (RA 00 00 06.0, Dec -77 20 19)
One of a group of three interacting galaxies comprised of PGC 8, 9 and 11 (which see for pictures of the group). Not listed by its PGC number in NED; use the designation ESO 012-IG 011 NED01. Based on its recessional velocity of 17000 km/sec, PGC 8 is about 760 million light years away; but taking into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's 3/4 billion year journey, it was about 40 million light years closer when the light by which we see it was emitted. Given its distance and apparent size of 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin, PGC 8 is about 65 thousand light years across; but that does not take into account the extensions due to the gravitational interactions of the group members.

PGC 9
A 17th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Octans (RA 00 00 08.7, Dec -77 20 21)
One of a group of three interacting galaxies comprised of PGC 8, 9 and 11 (which see for pictures of the group). Not listed by its PGC number in NED; use the designation ESO 012-IG 011 NED02. Based on its recessional velocity of 17590 km/sec, PGC 9 is about 785 million light years away; but taking into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's 3/4 billion year journey, it was about 40 million light years closer when the light by which we see it was emitted. Given its distance and apparent size of 0.4 by 0.25 arcmin, PGC 9 is about 85 thousand light years across; but that does not take into account the extensions due to the gravitational interactions of the group members. (Note: A Wikisky search for PGC 9 does not work, due to an all too common truncation error; search for one of its companions, instead.)

PGC 10
A 16th-(B)magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 07.8, Dec -00 02 26)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7090 km/sec, PGC 10 is about 315 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.4 arcmins, it is about 40 thousand light years across. Listed by I. D. Karachentsev as a member (with PGC 7) of pair KPG 600.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 10
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 10; see PGC 7 for a wide-field view

PGC 11
A 17th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S0?) in
Octans (RA 00 00 09.5, Dec -77 20 30)
One of a group of three interacting galaxies, comprised of PGC 8, 9, and 11. NED uses PGC 11 as the designation for the group, and PGC 11 itself is listed as ESO 012-IG 011 NED 03. Based on its recessional velocity of 17000 km/sec, PGC 11 is about 760 million light years away; but taking into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's 3/4 billion year journey, it was about 40 million light years closer when the light by which we see it was emitted. Given its distance and apparent size of 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin, PGC 11 is about 95 thousand light years across; but that does not take into account the extensions due to the gravitational interactions of the group members.
Wikisky image of PGC 8, 9 and 11
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 8, 9 and 11; also shown is PGC 236537
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the group
Wikisky image of region near PGC 8, 9 and 11

PGC 12
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa pec?) in
Cetus (RA 00 00 08.6, Dec -06 22 26)
Based on a recessional velocity of 6545 km/sec, PGC 12 is about 290 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 0.3 arcmins, it is about 125 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of PGC 12
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 12
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 12

PGC 13
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 00 13.4, Dec +33 08 03)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5050 km/sec, PGC 13 is about 225 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.8 arcmins, it is about 60 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of PGC 13
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 13; the "bright" star nearby is 9th magnitude
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 13

PGC 14
A 16th-magnitude elliptical galaxy (type E4?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 07.0, Dec +08 16 45)
Based on a recessional velocity of 11600 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 14 is about 520 million light years away; however, due to the expansion of the Universe during its light's half billion year journey, the galaxy was about 20 million light years closer at the time the light by which we see it was emitted. Given its distance and apparent size of 1.45 by 0.85 arcmins, the galaxy is about 200 thousand light years across. Cataloged as a narrow-line Seyfert galaxy (type NLSy1). Note: Not listed by PGC number in NED; for a search, use UGC 12890.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 14
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 14
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 14

PGC 15 (= PGC 143107)
A 15th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 05.0, Dec -05 12 34)
Based on a recessional velocity of 11290 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 15 is about 500 million light years away; however, due to the expansion of the Universe during its light's half billion year journey, the galaxy was about 20 million light years closer at the time the light by which we see it was emitted. Given its distance and apparent size of 0.65 by 0.65 arcmins, it is about 95 thousand light years across. Note: Not listed by PGC number in NED; for a search, use MCG-01-01-015.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 15
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 15
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region near PGC 15 and PGC 16 (an optical double, only half as far away)
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 15 and 16
(Note: Wide-field image above is centered at RA 00 00 08, Dec -05 11 00)

PGC 16 (= PGC 143114)
A 15th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 11.3, Dec -05 09 32)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5670 km/sec, PGC 16 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.4 arcmins, it is about 60 thousand light years across.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 16
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 16; see PGC 15 for a wide-field view

PGC 17
A 17th-magnitude peculiar galaxy (type ?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 10.4, Dec +04 55 51)
Based on a recessional velocity of 8995 km/sec, PGC 17 is about 400 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.2 by 0.15 arcmins, it is about 20 thousand light years across. Note: Not listed by PGC number in NED; for a search, use UM 015.
Wikisky image of PGC 17
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 17
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of PGC 17

PGC 18
A 15th-magnitude starburst galaxy (type SB?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 00 13.0, Dec +46 57 54)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5365 km/sec, PGC 18 is about 240 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.1 by 1.0 arcmins, it is about 75 thousand light years in diameter. The galaxy is listed as a member of WBL729, a group with an average recessional velocity of about 5020 km/sec which also includes IC 1525 and PGC 73195. IC 1525 is also listed as a member of Local Galaxy Group 485, which includes PGC 2 and 676; so all five galaxies may be physically related. PGC 2, 18 and 73195 and IC 1525 (which see for a wide-field view of the four galaxies) are less than 30 arcmin apart, and if at nearly the same distance from us, may be within a region less than two million light years across; but PGC 676 is quite a bit further away, being about 2 1/2 degrees east of the other group members. In the images below, the reddish cast below and bluish cast above is due to poor color correction of the DSS mosaic; it is not a real difference in color. Note: Not listed by PGC number in NED; for a search, use WBL729-003.
Wikisky image of PGC 18
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 18; the "bright" star below is a 7th-magnitude object
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is PGC 73195
Wikisky image of PGC 18

PGC 19 (= PGC 143118)
A 17th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Tucana (RA 00 00 16.0, Dec -72 11 12)
Considered a pair with PGC 22, as shown by their ESO and NED catalog entries; but almost nothing appears to be known about them, so they are more likely to be an optical double than in any way connected. PGC 19 has an apparent size of 0.4 by 0.2 arcmins; but nothing else is available. Note: Not listed by PGC number in NED; for a search, use ESO 050-IG 005 NED01.
Wikisky image of PGC 19 and 22
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 19 and 22
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on PGC 19
Wikisky image of region near PGC 19 and 22

PGC 20
A 15th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type SABdm?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 12.8, Dec +01 07 13)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7390 km/sec, PGC 20 is about 330 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.8 by 0.55 arcmins, it is about 75 thousand light years across.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 20
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 20
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 20

PGC 21
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 17.0, Dec -02 38 22)
The apparent size of PGC 21 is 0.3 by 0.2 arcmins; apparently nothing else is available: Note: An NED search for PGC 21 incorrectly shows PGC 1086746; to view the correct object, search for 2MASXJ00001695-0238213
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 21
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 21; for a wide-field view, see PGC 23

PGC 22 (= PGC 265123)
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Tucana (RA 00 00 17.5, Dec -72 10 13)
Considered a pair with PGC 19 (which see for images), as shown by their ESO and NED catalog entries; but almost nothing appears to be known about them, so they are more likely to be an optical double than in any way connected. PGC 22 has an apparent size of 0.2 by 0.15 arcmins; but nothing else is available. Note: Not listed by PGC number in NED; for a search, use ESO 050-IG 005 NED02.

PGC 23
A 15th-(B)magnitude supergiant elliptical galaxy (type cD?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 21.5, Dec -02 36 44)
Based on a recessional velocity of 11365 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 23 is a little over 500 million light years away. However, at that distance we need to take the expansion of the Universe into account, as during the half billion years it took the light by which we see the galaxy to reach us, the space between us and it has expanded by about 20 million light years. As a result, it was only about 485 million light years away when it emitted that light. Given that and its apparent size of 1.4 by 0.8 arcmins, the galaxy is about 200 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 23
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 23; also shown is PGC 1086746
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 23

PGC 24 (=
IC 5371)
A 15th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in Andromeda (RA 00 00 14.8, Dec +32 49 56)

PGC 25 (with PGC 200388 and PGC 1679585 =
Arp 249)
One of a pair (or triplet) of galaxies in Pegasus
PGC 25 = A 15th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) at RA 00 00 19.3, Dec +22 59 25
PGC 200388 = A 16th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) at RA 00 00 19.8, Dec +22 59 37
PGC 1679585 = An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) at RA 00 00 21.0, Dec +22 59 44
Based on a recessional velocity of 11710 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 25 is about 525 million light years away. However, at that distance we need to take the expansion of the Universe into account, as during the half billion years it took the light by which we see the galaxy to reach us, the space between us and it has expanded by about 20 million light years. As a result, it was only a little over 500 million light years away when it emitted that light. Given that and its apparent size of 0.85 by 0.5 arcmin (including its distorted outer regions), it is about 125 thousand light years across. PGC 25 is part of an interacting pair with PGC 200388 (hence its use by Arp as an example of a multiple galaxy), and most searches for PGC 25 will show information about the pair instead of the individual galaxy. For a galaxy-specific NED search, use UGC 12891 NED01 for PGC 25, and UGC 12891 NED02 for PGC 200388.
SDSS image of PGC 25, 200388 and 1679585, collectively also known as Arp 249
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of Arp 249
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the group
SDSS image of region near Arp 249

PGC 200388 (with PGC 25 and PGC 1679585 =
Arp 249)
This entry is listed here as well as on its usual page for convenience in discussing Arp 249
A 16th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in Pegasus (RA 00 00 19.8, Dec +22 59 37)
(See PGC 25, above, for images.) Based on a recessional velocity of 11690 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 200388 is about 525 million light years away. However, at that distance we need to take the expansion of the Universe into account, as during the half billion years it took the light by which we see the galaxy to reach us, the space between us and it has expanded by about 20 million light years. As a result, it was only a little over 500 million light years away when it emitted that light. Given that and its apparent size of 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 35 thousand light years across. PGC 200388 is part of an interacting pair with PGC 25 (hence its use by Arp as an example of a multiple galaxy), and most searches for PGC 200388 will fail, as it is usually treated as if part of PGC 25. For an NED search, use UGC 12891 NED02 instead of PGC 200388.

PGC 1679585
(with PGC 25 and PGC 200388 = Arp 249)
This entry is listed here as well as on its usual page for convenience in discussing Arp 249
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in Pegasus (RA 00 00 21.0, Dec +22 59 44)
(See PGC 25, above, for images.) A faint (optical? physical?) companion to PGC 25 and 200388. Apparent size 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin; nothing else available

PGC 26
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Cetus (RA 00 00 27.6, Dec -07 52 56)
Based on its diffuse appearance, probably a relatively close irregular galaxy; but nothing seems to be available, save for its apparent size of 0.9 by 0.7 arcmins. Note: NED does not recognize the PGC entry; search using MCG-01-01-019.
Wikisky image of PGC 26
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 26
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 26

PGC 27 (= PGC 143131)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SBab?) in
Cetus (RA 00 00 23.5, Dec -06 56 10)
Based on a recessional velocity of 11315 km/sec, PGC 27 is about 500 million light years away (although as noted for other galaxies with such large recessional velocities, the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly half billion year journey means that it was about 20 million light years closer when the light by which we see it was emitted). Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.3 arcmins, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of PGC 27
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 27
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 27

PGC 28
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 00 22.3, Dec +20 47 47)
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmins; nothing else available.
Wikisky image of PGC 28
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 28
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 28

PGC 29
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBc?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 00 22.3, Dec +34 36 57)
Based on a recessional velocity of 12700 km/sec, PGC 29 is about 570 million light years away (although as noted for other galaxies with such large recessional velocities, the expansion of the Universe during its light's more than half billion year journey means that it was about 25 million light years closer when the light by which we see it was emitted). Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.5 arcmins, it is about 100 thousand light years across. Listed as a member of WBL732, a group of galaxies with an average recessional velocity of 8870 km/sec, along with PGC 77, 91 and IC 5376.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 29
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 29
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 29

PGC 30
A 14th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type (R)SAB(rs)bc pec) in
Octans (RA 00 00 22.1, Dec -80 47 35)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7905 km/sec, PGC 30 is about 350 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.5 by 1.3 arcmins, it is about 150 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of PGC 30
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 30
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 30

PGC 31
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SA(s)0) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 23.7, Dec -47 01 08)
Based on a recessional velocity of 5990 km/sec, PGC 31 is about 270 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.6 arcmins, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
Wikisky image of PGC 31
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 31
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 31

PGC 32 (= PGC 480744)
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type Sa?) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 22.9, Dec -49 04 27)
The apparent size of PGC 32 is 0.45 by 0.2 arcmins; apparently nothing else is available. However, it is listed in Leda, ESO and NED as a pair with PGC 34. There is no apparent connection between the two, so they may be merely an optical double; but if they are at comparable distances, PGC 32 is about 110 thousand light years across. Note: Not listed in NED by PGC number; so search using ESO 193-IG 007 NED01 (the NED01 referring to its presumed status as a pair member). For images, see its supposed companion, PGC 34.

PGC 33 (=
NGC 7807)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab?) in Cetus (RA 00 00 26.6, Dec -18 50 31)

PGC 34 (= PGC 480729)
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 26.1, Dec -49 04 32)
Based on a recessional velocity of 20220 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 34 is about 900 million light years away (although as noted for other galaxies with such large recessional velocities, the expansion of the Universe during its light's nearly billion year journey means that it was about 55 million light years closer when the light by which we see it was emitted). Given that and its apparent size of 0.5 by 0.35 arcmins, it is about 125 thousand light years across. PGC 34 is listed in Leda, ESO and NED as a pair with PGC 32; however, there is no apparent connection between the two, so they may be merely an optical double. Note: Not listed in NED by PGC number; so search using ESO 193-IG 007 NED02 (the NED02 referring to its presumed status as a pair member).
Wikisky image of PGC 32 and 34
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 32 and 34
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on PGC 34
Wikisky image of region near PGC 32 and 34

PGC 35
A 17th-magnitude dwarf irregular galaxy (type Im) in
Andromeda (RA 00 00 22.5, Dec +39 29 44)
Based on a recessional velocity of 335 km/sec, PGC 35 is about 15 million light years away. For such a small recessional velocity, the peculiar (non-Hubble-expansion velocity) velocity may significantly affect the accuracy of the distance estimate; but since there don't seem to be any redshift-independent distance estimates, that problem has to be ignored. Assuming the distance is more or less correct, the apparent size of 0.9 by 0.9 arcmins suggests that the galaxy is only 4 thousand light years across, hence its classification as a dwarf.
Wikisky image of PGC 35
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 35
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 35

PGC 36 (= PGC 48 =
IC 5373)
A 15th-magnitude pair of galaxies in Andromeda (RA 00 00 29.0, Dec +32 46 56)

PGC 37
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type E3?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 00 31.7, Dec +26 18 19)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7755 km/sec, PGC 37 is about 345 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.55 by 0.4 arcmins, it is about 55 thousand light years across. PGC 37 and 47 are less than 2 arcmin apart, and have nearly the same recessional velocity, so they may be a physical pair; but there is no mention of that possibility in the standard databases, despite the fact that PGC 47 has a complex central structure and faint extended arms (particularly to the north) which are suggestive of a gravitational interaction.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 37 and 47
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 37 and 47
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxies
Wikisky SDSS image of region near PGC 37 and 47
Note: The wide-field image is centered on RA 00 00 32, Dec +26 19 00

PGC 38
A 15th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAdm) in
Pegasus (RA 00 00 28.5, Dec +17 13 13)
Based on a recessional velocity of 1095 km/sec, PGC 38 is about 50 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.7 by 1.7 arcmins, it is about 25 thousand light years across. PGC 38 is listed as a member of the NGC 7814 Group, which also contains NGC 14, PGC 332 and 889.
Wikisky image of PGC 38
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 38
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Wikisky image of region near PGC 38

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PGC 39
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SBab) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 25.2, Dec +07 51 14)
Apparent size 0.8 by 0.5 arcmins; nothing else available
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 39

PGC 40
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 35.6, Dec -01 45 47)
Based on recessional velocity of 7275 km/sec, about 320 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.7 by 0.45 arcmins, about 65 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 40

PGC 41
A 17th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 26.1, Dec -05 46 39)
Based on recessional velocity of 22115 km/sec, about 985 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.45 by 0.3 arcmins, about 130 thousand light years in diameter. Probably gravitationally bound to PGC 46. The closeup below shows the two galaxies.
Wikisky SDSS image of PGC 41and 46

PGC 42
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 26.9, Dec -42 32 52)
Based on recessional velocity of 8860 km/sec, about 400 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.45 by 0.25 arcmins, about 50 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of PGC 42

PGC 43
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type SAB(r)bc) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 29.5, Dec -40 29 04)
Based on recessional velocity of 3170 km/sec, about 140 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 1.6 by 0.35 arcmins, about 65 thousand light years in diameter.
Wikisky image of PGC 43

PGC 44
A 16th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Phoenix (PGC RA 00 00 32.7, Dec -50 08 53)
Listed in NED as ESO 193-IG 008 NED02. The northeastern galaxy of a pair, with PGC 45. Based on a recessional velocity of 8600 km/sec, about 380 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.4 by 0.4 arcmins, about 45 thousand light years in diameter. However, there is a second recessional velocity measurement of 20,200 km/sec (!), which would imply a distance of about 900 million light years, so the distance and size are very uncertain.
Wikisky image of PGC 44 and 45

PGC 45
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 31.0, Dec -50 09 15)
Listed in NED as ESO 193-IG NED01. The southwestern galaxy of a pair, with PGC 44. Based on a recessional velocity of 8600 km/sec, about 380 million light years away. Given that and an apparent size of 1.0 by 0.5 arcmins, about 110 thousand light years in diameter (but see PGC 44 for a note about a second velocity and distance estimate, which would yield a very different size, as well). See PGC 44 for images of the pair of galaxies.

PGC 46
A 17th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 29.7, Dec -05 46 35)
Based on recessional velocity of 21960 km/sec, about 980 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.4 by 0.25 arcmins, about 115 thousand light years in diameter. Probably gravitationally bound to PGC 41, which see for images of PGC 46.

PGC 47
A 15th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S pec?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 00 31.4, Dec +26 19 32)
Based on a recessional velocity of 7655 km/sec, PGC 47 is about 340 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 1.0 by 0.9 arcmins, it is about 100 thousand light years across. PGC 47 and 37 (which see for images of the "pair") are less than 2 arcmin apart, and have nearly the same recessional velocity, so they may be a physical pair; but there is no mention of that possibility in the standard databases, despite the fact that PGC 47 has a complex central structure and faint extended arms (particularly to the north) which are suggestive of a gravitational interaction.

PGC 48 (= PGC 36 =
IC 5373)
A 15th-magnitude pair of galaxies in Andromeda (RA 00 00 29.0, Dec +32 46 56)

PGC 49
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S pec?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 33.5, Dec +22 46 42)
Recessional velocity 6055 km/sec, apparent size 0.4 by 0.4 arcmin

PGC 50
A 17th-(B)magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 35.0, Dec -40 34 50)
Apparent size 0.35 by 0.15 arcmin

PGC 51
A 17th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 35.8, Dec -40 34 32)
Recessional velocity 15020 km/sec, apparent size 0.55 by 0.2 arcmin

PGC 52
A 17th-(B) magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 00 37.4, Dec +36 10 54)
Apparent size 0.35 by 0.2 arcmin

PGC 53
A 17th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sd?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 00 38.3, Dec +20 03 32)
Recessional velocity 6745 km/sec, apparent size 0.7 by 0.5 arcmin

PGC 54
A 15th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 38.0, Dec +28 23 04)
Recessional velocity 8705 km/sec, apparent size 1.15 by 0.4 arcmin
Redshift-independent distance 115 to 141 Mpc, in a triple (see NED)

PGC 55
A spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 37.4, Dec +33 36 03)

PGC 56
A lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Cetus (RA 00 00 40.8, Dec -05 47 19)

PGC 57
A lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 42.4, Dec +28 22 08)

PGC 58
A lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0/a?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 44.0, Dec +28 24 05)

PGC 59
A spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in
Andromeda (RA 00 00 44.5, Dec +36 52 09)

PGC 60
A lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 45.1, Dec +28 22 18)

PGC 61 (= PGC 1042932)
A spiral galaxy (type Sc?) in
Cetus (RA 00 00 48.5, Dec -05 34 48)

PGC 62
(= ESO 012-013)

A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Sbc) in
Octans (RA 00 00 47.0, Dec -77 34 48)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 10700 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 62 is about 495 to 500 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 475 to 480 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 485 to 490 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about ? thousand light-years across. *The previous sentence cannot be finished until I have posted better images (presuming any are available), but the apparent size is roughly an arcmin, so the physical size is probably around 140 thousand light-years.*
Note About Classification: The "edge-on" presentation of the galaxy makes it difficult to determine its type. LEDA lists this as an Sbc galaxy, while NED lists it as Sb; given that difference I have underlined the "b", indicating that that might be a more accurate classification.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 62
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 62

PGC 63
A lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 47.0, Dec +28 24 07)

PGC 64
A lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 00 52.3, Dec -35 50 37)

PGC 65 (= PGC 502673)
A spiral galaxy (type Sa?) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 53.3, Dec -47 21 25)

PGC 66
A lenticular galaxy (type S0??) in
Sculptor (RA 00 00 53.2, Dec -35 59 11)

PGC 67
A spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 56.2, Dec -49 31 18)

PGC 68
A spiral galaxy (type Sab??) in
Cetus (RA 00 00 55.3, Dec -18 57 32)

PGC 69
A spiral galaxy (type SBc??) in
Phoenix (RA 00 00 55.5, Dec -40 42 45)

PGC 70
A spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 56.1, Dec +20 20 17)
A superthin galaxy

PGC 71
A spiral galaxy (type Sbc??) in
Andromeda (RA 00 00 55.7, Dec +34 38 52)

PGC 72
A nonexistent object in
Cetus (RA 00 00 57.7, Dec +02 52 42)
There have been several data entry errors for whatever this object is supposed to be, as LEDA identifies this as Kazarian 580, which is variously identified as also being Kazarian 555 (= PGC 71243) and Kazarian 383 (= PGC 39491 = PGC 1689922), and all three Kazarian entries appear to be the same object in Coma Berenices, at RA 12 18 04.5, Dec +23 34 59, even though the three sets of PGC entries have coordinates scattered across the sky. In any event, there is absolutely nothing at the location given for PGC 72, so regardless of what it is supposed to be, it is actually nonexistent.

PGC 73
A spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in
Sculptor (RA 00 00 58.6, Dec -33 36 43)

PGC 74
A spiral galaxy (type Sc??) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 58.2, Dec +33 20 38)

WORKING HERE

PGC 75
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 03, Dec -43 19 50)

PGC 76
(HyperLeda RA 00 00 59, Dec +28 54 42)

PGC 77
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 04, Dec +34 39 12)

PGC 78
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 14, Dec +13 09 43)

PGC 79 (=
IC 5374)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 00 01 05, Dec +04 30 00)

PGC 80 (=
IC 5375)
A 14th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Pisces (RA 00 01 05, Dec +04 32 31)

PGC 81 (=
NGC 7802)
A 14th-magnitude lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in Pisces (RA 00 01 00.5, Dec +06 14 30)

PGC 82
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 06, Dec -53 59 31)

PGC 83
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 06, Dec +32 22 37)

PGC 84 (= PGC 447124)
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 07, Dec -52 13 08)

PGC 85
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 08, Dec -50 15 50)

PGC 86
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 09, Dec +33 06 53)

PGC 87
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 10, Dec -50 35 05)

PGC 88
(HyperLeda RA 00 01 11, Dec -52 12 16)

PGC 89 (= HCG 100C)
A member of
Hickson Compact Group 100
A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type SBc? pec) in Pegasus (RA 00 01 13.4, Dec +13 08 38)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5460 km/sec, PGC 89 is about 255 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 45 thousand light years across. PGC 89 is listed as a member of the NGC 7810 Group of galaxies, which also includes NGC 7803. It is also a member of Hickson Compact Group 100, which consists of NGC 7803, PGC 108, PGC 89 and PGC 92.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 89, also known as Hickson Compact Group member 100C
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 89; for wider views, see Hickson Compact Group 100

PGC 90

PGC 91

PGC 92 (= HCG 100D)
A member of
Hickson Compact Group 100
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Pegasus (RA 00 01 15.1, Dec +13 06 47)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5590 km/sec, PGC 92 is about 260 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.4 by 0.1 arcmin, it is about 30 thousand light years across. PGC 92 is listed as a member of the NGC 7810 Group of galaxies, which also includes NGC 7803. It is also a member of Hickson Compact Group 100, which consists of NGC 7803, PGC 108, PGC 89 and PGC 92.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 92, also known as Hickson Compact Group member 100D
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 92; for wider views, see Hickson Compact Group 100

PGC 97
A magnitude 18(?) irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 01 29.5, Dec +13 05 55)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin; nothing else known, but thought to be a dwarf irregular galaxy.
SDSS image of irregular galaxy PGC 97
Above, a 0.7 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 97; for a wider view see NGC 7803

PGC 100

PGC 108 (= HCG 100B)
A member of
Hickson Compact Group 100
A magnitude 14.5(?) spiral galaxy (type SB(s)d? pec) in Pegasus (RA 00 01 26.0, Dec +13 06 47)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5255 km/sec, PGC 108 is about 235 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.6 by 0.4 arcmin, it is about 40 thousand light years across. PGC 108 is listed as a member of the NGC 7810 Group of galaxies, which also includes NGC 7803. It is also a member of Hickson Compact Group 100, which consists of NGC 7803, PGC 108, PGC 89 and PGC 92.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 108
Above, a 1.0 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 108; for wider views, see Hickson Compact Group 100

PGC 110

PGC 120

PGC 130

PGC 140

PGC 150

PGC 160

PGC 170

PGC 175
(= UGC 2)

A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type SABdm?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 02 25.9, Dec +44 55 15)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 18475 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 175 is about 860 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 800 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 825 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about ? thousand light-years across.
NED Sdm?
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 175
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 175
Below, a ? arcmin wide ? image of the galaxy
? image of spiral galaxy PGC 175
*DSS or PanSTARRS all that's available

PGC 180

PGC 181
(= PGC 227922 = ESO 012-014)

A magnitude 14.7(?) spiral/irregular galaxy (type S/IB(s)m) in
Octans (RA 00 02 42.4, Dec -80 20 54)
Note About Classification: The type is taken from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. The S/I means that the galaxy is so poorly structured (as indicated by the "m") that it is difficult to tell whether it is a "late-type" spiral or an irregular galaxy.
DSS image of spiral/irregular galaxy PGC 181
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 181

PGC 190

PGC 200

PGC 210

PGC 220

PGC 230

PGC 240

PGC 250

PGC 260

PGC 270

PGC 280

PGC 290

PGC 300

PGC 310

PGC 320

PGC 330

PGC 332
(= UGC 31 = CGCG 456-029 = MCG +03-01-022)

A magnitude 15(?) irregular galaxy (type IAm) in
Pegasus (RA 00 04 52.2, Dec +17 11 32)
Based on a recessional velocity of 680 km/sec, PGC 332 is about 30 million light years away (though with such a small recessional velocity, its random motion relative to its neighbors could make that a poor estimate). Given that and its apparent size of 1.15 by 0.85 arcmin (from the images below), it is only about 10 thousand light years across, so it is a "dwarf" galaxy. PGC 332 is listed as a member of the NGC 7814 Group, which also contains NGC 14, PGC 38 and 889.
SDSS image of region near irregular galaxy PGC 332
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 332
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of irregular galaxy PGC 332

PGC 340

PGC 350

PGC 360

PGC 366
The galaxy is listed as a member of a pair with 9 arcmin distant NGC 7824; if at the same distance from us, the two are about 750 thousand light years apart.

PGC 370

PGC 380

PGC 382
(= ESO 193-019 = Arp-Madore 0002-503)

A magnitude 13.5 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs, nr)bc? pec) in
Phoenix (RA 00 05 29.0 Dec - 50 16 13)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 10185 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 382 is about 475 million light-years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 340 to 530 million light-years. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 455 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 460 to 465 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about of about 1.45 by 1.0 arcmin for the central galaxy, and about 2.45 by 1.7 arcmin for the extended arms and scattered outer regions (from the images below), the central galaxy is about 190 to 195 thousand light-years across, and its outer regions span about 325 thousand light-years. Among other things, the galaxy is unusual in having three major spiral arms, even though the third one (on the western side) is of abbreviated length compared to the very extensive other arms. The HST image is one of the first images taken after the Hubble Space Telescope, which had been offline for more than a month in early 2021 because of a defective memory chip, was finally induced to start working again.
 This galaxy is among those in the Arp-Madore Catalogue of Southern Peculiar Galaxies & Associations, but although listed as a member of Category 8: Galaxies with Apparent Companions in an ASCII file with the note "Spiral with Apparent Companions", there is nothing else in the Catalogue about it, and it does not appear in a supposedly complete list of objects in the Catalogue.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 382
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 382
Below, a 3 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 382
Below, a 2 image wide image of the galaxy
(Image Credit NASA/ESA/STScI, Julianne Dalcanton (UW), Alyssa Pagan (STScI)); orientation and sizing by Courtney SeligmanHST image of spiral galaxy PGC 382
Below, a 1.25 arcmin wide image of the central galaxy (Image Credit as above)
HST image of central portion of spiral galaxy PGC 382

PGC 390

PGC 400

PGC 410

PGC 420

PGC 430

PGC 440

PGC 450

PGC 460

PGC 470

PGC 474
(= PGC 575188 = ESO 293-034 = MCG -07-01-009)

A magnitude 13.1 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)cd? pec) in
Phoenix (RA 00 06 19.9, Dec -41 30 00)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1275 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 474 is about 60 million light-years away, in good agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 60 to 100 million light-years (though if, as noted below, its apparent neighbor is a physical companion, the actual distance of the pair is more like 55 to 60 million light-years). Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), PGC 474 is about ? thousand light-years across. *Until a closeup image is posted, the apparent size won't be available, so neither will the probable physical size*
Apparent Companion: The small galaxy to the southeast of PGC 474 (PGC 482) has a similar recessional velocity to its larger neighbor, and may well be a physical companion (and perhaps the cause of its unusual appearance); so see its entry, as well.
Note About Classification: The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies lists this as type S spw pec. "spw" means that the galaxy is a "warped spindle", or an "edge-on" galaxy with a warped disk. Between being edge-on and having a very strange structure, the Spitzer Survey team could not determine anything about the classification, except that it is a spiral galaxy. However, HyperLEDA lists it as type SBc, and NED as type SB(s)cd pec edge-on, both of which are consistent with the Spitzer classification, so the NED "type" is the one shown in the description line (other than "edge-on", which is obvious from its images); but I did add a question mark to reflect the poor quality of the images available.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 474, also showing PGC 482
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 474

PGC 475 (=
Arp 51)
(= PGC 73242 = MCG -02-01-024)

A magnitude 15(?) spiral galaxy (type SAB(s)bc pec?) in Cetus (RA 00 06 16.7, Dec -13 26 53)
Physical Information: Not much is known about this galaxy. Classifications range from fairly standard (SABb) to complex (SB(s) c pec II-III), hence the question mark in the type shown in the description line. The distance and recessional velocity of the galaxy are unknown, so all that can be said about it is that it has an apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.55 arcmin (from the images below).
Usage By The Arp Atlas: PGC 475 is used by the Arp Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as an example of a spiral galaxy with a small bright companion, but there is nothing in that catalog about the object other than a photograph in which Arp must have presumed that the bright "knot" northeast of the nucleus was a bright companion, because there is absolutely nothing near the galaxy, other than Arp 144, which lies a few arcmin to the northeast. I can't help but think that this is a case of something being seen where there was nothing to see, simply because someone was looking for something, and that Arp 51 does not really belong in the Arp Atlas at all. (That is apparently the opinion of others as well, since the galaxy is not listed as Arp 51 in the HyperLEDA database.)
 NED does list this galaxy as Arp 51, and states (under "As Published") "small, high surface brightness companion on end of arm." However, none of what is written in NED is actually in the Arp Atlas; only its number puts in the category "spiral galaxies with a small high brightness companion," as there is not a single word in the Atlas about the object.
DSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 475, also known as Arp 51; also shown is the peculiar pairing NGC 7828/7829, also known as Arp 144
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 475; also shown is NGC 7828/7829, or Arp 144
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of PGC 475
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 475, also known as Arp 51

PGC 480

PGC 482 (perhaps (or probably?) a companion of
PGC 474)
(= ESO 293-034.1 = MCG -07-01-010)

A magnitude 14.8 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Phoenix (RA 00 06 25.4, Dec -41 30 24)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 1190 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 482 is about 55 million light-years away; but given the fact that "peculiar velocities" (random motions of galaxies relative to their neighbors) are often in excess of 100 km/sec, and the recessional velocity of PGC 482 is only 85 km/sec less than that of PGC 474, there is a very good chance that they are a physical pair, with a distance of about 55 to 60 million light-years. Given that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about ? thousand light-years across. *Actual apparent and physical sizes will have to wait for closeup and/or better images, but PGC 482 is certainly much smaller than PGC 474, whether they are companions or not*
Classification Note: Obviously, given the poor quality of the image shown here, it is difficult to deterine what kind of galaxy PGC 482 is. NED lists it as S?, and LEDA as Sab. Since early-type spirals (that is, lower letter designations) tend to have larger nuclear bulges, and there is no sign of a nuclear bulge in the image below, I find "Sab" hard to believe; and in fact all the references cited by LEDA list this as somewhere between Sb and Scd, with an "average" of Sbc, which I have used in the description line with a question mark to reflect all the uncertainties involved.
DSS image of region near PGC 474, also showing spiral galaxy PGC 482
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 474, also showing PGC 482

PGC 490
Celestial Atlas
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