Celestial Atlas
Miscellaneous PGC Objects (PGC 130000 - 999999) Link for sharing this page on Facebook
 The original Principal Galaxies Catalog contained 73,197 entries. Subsequent revisions have increased this to more than three million entries. I have no intention of covering all of those entries on this site, but there needs to be a place to list or discuss (if needed) any PGC entries referred to elsewhere, so this page (or if it grows too large some group of pages based on this page) will eventually discuss all such entries with PGC designations of 130,000 to 999,999.

Page last updated Sep 27, 2021
WORKING PGC 160085 (spurred by HST image of NGC 5728)
QuickLinks:
PGC 140000, PGC 150000, PGC 160000, PGC 170000, PGC 180000, PGC 190000
PGC 200000, PGC300000, PGC 400000, PGC 600000
PGC 600000, PGC 700000, PGC 800000, PGC 900000

PGC 135657
A magnitude 15.5(?) spiral galaxy (type S(rs)c? pec) in
Cetus (RA 02 40 11.1, Dec -01 46 28)
Physical Information: Apparent size 1.35 by 1.25 arcmin, including faint outer arms.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 135657
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 135657
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 135657

PGC 138155
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Pisces (RA 00 17 52, Dec +11 29 50)
Based on recessional velocity of 11390 km/sec, about 500 million light years away. Given that and starlike apparent size of 0.07 arcmin, perhaps 10 thousand light years across. In nearly the same direction as PGC 138157, which see for image.

PGC 138157
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Pisces (RA 00 17 54, Dec +11 29 35)
Based on recessional velocity of 26080 km/sec, about 1.15 billion light years away. Given that and starlike apparent size of 0.07 arcmin, perhaps 20 thousand light years across.
DSS of PGC 138155 and 138157
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 138155 and 138157; see NGC 63 for a wide-field image

PGC 138192 (= PGC 2010 =
NGC 135)

PGC 138202 (=
IC 36)

PGC 138206 (=
IC 41)

PGC 139241 (sometimes identified as but not =
NGC 3122)
A magnitude 14(?) spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Sextans (RA 10 06 17.2, Dec -06 34 27)
Since sometimes misidentified as NGC 3122, see here for anything else

PGC 139865
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Virgo (RA 12 28 02, Dec +11 40 50)
Listed in NED as SDSSJ122802.01+114049.6. Based on recessional velocity of 20820 km/sec, about 930 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.3 by 0.15 arcmin, about 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of PGC 139865
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 139865
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are PGC 40916, 40953, 40995
(and at the lower edge, 41005), 169328, 169337 and 169351 (and at the upper edge, IC 3381)
SDSS image of PGC 139865


PGC 141041
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type SB?) in
Pegasus (RA 22 36 41, Dec +33 56 56)
Based on recessional velocity of 6055 km/sec, about 270 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin, about 40 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of PGC 141041
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 141041
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of PGC 141041

PGC 141134
See
PGC 141134, on NGC Objects 7750 - 7799

PGC 143572 (=
IC 27)

PGC 144318 (=
IC 158)



PGC 160085
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in
Libra (RA 14 42 10.5, Dec -17 15 49)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Background Radiation of 13120 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 160085 is about 610 million light-years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 580 million light-years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 590 to 595 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.45 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 75 thousand light-years across.
(Lack Of) Relationship To NGC 5728: Normally, PGC 160085 might be listed on the page for NGC 5728, as an apparent companion; but it is listed here instead, because it is a much more distant background galaxy, and therefore has no relationship to the far nearer galaxy.
Classification Note: The galaxy has a very peculiar structure, obviously caused by some kind of collision or gravitational interaction; in fact, although there is no way to tell from currently available data, the elongated object on the northwestern side of the galaxy may well be another galaxy which is the cause of the disturbance to PGC 160085.
PanSTARRS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 160085, also showing NGC 5728
Above, a 12 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image centered on PGC 160085, also showing NGC 5728
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of PGC 160085
PanSTARRS image of spiral galaxy PGC 160085

PGC 165298 (=
IC 15)
For anything else, see IC 15

PGC 165316 (=
IC 86)
For anything else, see IC 86

PGC 165579 (=
NGC 3758), the Owl Galaxy
(= PGC 35905 = CGCG 126-110 = MCG +04-27-073)

A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type Sab? pec) in Leo (RA 11 36 29.2, Dec +21 35 46)
For anything else, see NGC 3758

PGC 169337
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Virgo (RA 12 27 52, Dec +11 37 02)
Identified in NED as VPC 559. Although the Virgo Photometry Catalogue is a list of galaxies in the area of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, PGC 169337 is not a member of that cluster, but a very distant background object. Based on its recessional velocity of 26880 km/sec, it is about 1.2 billion light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.3 by 0.25 arcmin, it is about 100 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of PGC 169337
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 169337
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Also shown are (among others) PGC 40872 and 40953
SDSS image of PGC 169337

PGC 169351
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Virgo (RA 12 28 15, Dec +11 40 59)
Listed in NED as VPC 587. Although the Virgo Photometry Catalogue is a list of galaxies in the area of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, PGC 169351 is not a member of that cluster, but a very distant background object. Based on its recessional velocity of 25730 km/sec, it is about 1.15 billion light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across. PGC 169351 and 169360 have similar recessional velocities, and are probably about the same distance from us, so there is a chance that they are gravitationally bound.
SDSS image of PGC 169351
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 169351; see PGC 40995 for a wide-field image

PGC 169360
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Virgo (RA 12 28 35, Dec +11 41 27)
Listed in NED as VPC 604. Although the Virgo Photometry Catalogue is a list of galaxies in the area of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, PGC 169360 is not a member of that cluster, but a very distant background object. Based on its recessional velocity of 25985 km/sec, it is about 1,15 billion light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.2 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 70 thousand light years across. PGC 169360 and 169351 have similar recessional velocities, and are probably about the same distance from us, so there is a chance that they are gravitationally bound.
SDSS image of PGC 169360
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 169360
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy (labeling in progress)
SDSS image of PGC 169360

PGC 169363
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Virgo (RA 12 28 42, Dec +11 38 17)
Listed in NED as SDSSJ122841.89+113816.7. Based on recessional velocity of 26085 km/sec, about 1.15 billion light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.15 by 0.15 arcmin, about 60 thousand light years across. Given its proximity to PGC 169365 in direction and distance (as inferred from their recessional velocities), there is a good chance that the galaxies are gravitationally bound.
SDSS image of PGC 169363 and 169365
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 169363 and 169365
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the pair
SDSS image of region near PGC 169363 and 169365

PGC 169365
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Virgo (RA 12 28 44, Dec +11 38 10)
Listed in NED as VPC 614. Although the Virgo Photometry Catalogue is a list of galaxies in the area of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, PGC 169365 is not a member of that cluster, but a very distant background object. Based on recessional velocity of 26010 km/sec, about 1.15 billion light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.3 by 0.1 arcmin, about 100 thousand light years across. Given its proximity to PGC 169363 (which see for views of the galaxies) in direction and distance (as inferred from their recessional velocities), there is a good chance that the galaxies are gravitationally bound.

PGC 169366
(Shown on one of following pages: NGC 4452, IC 3381, PGC 40953, 40995 or 41005?)
SDSS image of PGC 169366

PGC 169367
(Shown on one of following pages: NGC 4452, IC 3381, PGC 40953, 40995 or 41005?)
SDSS image of PGC 169367

PGC 169872
(no entry posted yet)

WORKING HERE: NEED TO DECIDE HOW TO CATALOG

SDSS J122838.80+113702.6
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type (R)SB?) in
Virgo (RA 12 28 39, Dec +11 37 03)
Although not an NGC/IC/PGC object, listed here because of brightness and proximity to listed objects
Based on its recessional velocity of 26130 km/sec, about 1.15 billion light years away. Given that and its apparent size of 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin, about 80 thousand light years across. Given its proximity to PGC 169363 and 169365 in direction and distance (as inferred from their recessional velocities), there is a good chance that the galaxies are gravitationally bound.
SDSS image of SDSS J122838.80+113702.6
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of SDSS J122838.80+113702.6; see PGC 169363 for a wide-field view

PGC 169886 (= part of
IC 3614)

PGC 169992 (=
IC 28)


PGC 170172 (almost certainly not =
NGC 3915)
Not an NGC object but sometimes misidentified as NGC 3915
A magnitude 14(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/SAB0?) in Virgo (RA 11 46 55.6, Dec -05 11 16)
Historical Misidentification: As noted in the entry for NGC 3915, this is one of several galaxies that have been misidentified as that almost certainly lost or nonexistent object (which see for a discussion of that topic). As a result, this entry serves not only as a discussion of PGC 170172, but also as a warning about the misidentification.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 2930 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 170172 is about 135 to 140 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.36 by 0.32 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 15 thousand light years across. Based on the unusually bright center of the galaxy, it is possible that it is a Seyfert galaxy.
DSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 170172, which is sometimes misidentified as the lost or nonexistent NGC 3915
Above, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image centered on PGC 1790172
Below, a 1 arcmin wide DSS image of the galaxy
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 170172, which is sometimes misidentified as the lost or nonexistent NGC 3915
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide PanSTARRS image of the galaxy
PanSTARRS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 170172, which is sometimes misidentified as the lost or nonexistent NGC 3915

PGC 173286 (=
IC 70)


PGC 183408 (a probable companion of
NGC 4766)
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0) in Virgo (RA 12 53 04.2, Dec -10 21 57)
For anything else see this entry

PGC 185799
A magnitude 16(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Telescopium (RA 19 50 29.2, Dec -51 21 42)
Apparent size 0.35 by 0.35 arcmin. Nothing else known. Type based on the image below, and given its poor quality, very uncertain.
DSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 185799
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 185799; southeast of IC 4900, which see for a wider image


PGC 198197
A 16th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 48 21.9, Dec -25 07 37)
(Usually referred to as 2MASX J00482185-2507365, but searchable on NED by its PGC listing.) Based on a recessional velocity of 19190 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that the galaxy is about 890 million light years away. However, at such distances, we must take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time the galaxy's light took to reach us. Doing so shows that the galaxy was 830 million light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, 855 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the space between it and us during that time). A Hubble news release (accompanying the closeup image below) states that the galaxy is about 780 million light years away, in reasonable agreement with the redshift distance. Using a distance of about 800 million light years and its apparent size of 0.42 by 0.25 arcmin suggests that PGC 198197 is about 100 thousand light years across (which also agrees with the estimate in the Hubble news release). Perhaps the most interesting feature of the galaxy is its nearly perfect alignment with another galaxy, HKW2009, an 18th-(B)magnitude foreground galaxy which appears about five times smaller, and being closer is suggested as being perhaps a tenth its size, or about 10 thousand light years across. The overlapping of the galaxies provides an unusually detailed view of the dusty outer regions of the foreground galaxy, and suggests that they extend several times as far from its core as the visible stars in its spiral structure (so that it is actually several times larger than it appears). It has been long known that many (if not most) galaxies have extensive "haloes" filled with gas, dust and other unseen material (such as "dark matter"), but it is unusual to find such an easy and exact way to study those regions.

Above, a half arcmin wide closeup of PGC 198197 and HKW2009
(Image Credits: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA))
Below, an 11 arcmin wide view showing PGC 198197's position relative to NGC 253 (Image Credits: ESO)
A very small portion of an ESO image of NGC 253, showing the location of PGC 198197


PGC 200252 (= "NGC 3040B")
A magnitude 15.0 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Leo (RA 09 53 03.5, Dec +19 26 33)
See "NGC 3040B" for anything else

PGC 200317 (with
PGC 51214 = Arp 45)

PGC 212468 (=
NGC 4)
A magnitude 15.9 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in Pisces (RA 00 07 24.4, Dec +08 22 26)
(See NGC 4 for anything else.)

PGC 212475
An 18th-magnitude galaxy (type Irr?) in Pisces (RA 00 08 30, Dec +04 37 08)
Listed in NED as 2MASXJ00082976+0437081
Apparent size 0.5 by 0.3 arcmins; nothing else available
DSS of PGC 212475
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 212475; also see the wide-field view of
NGC 12

PGC 212477
A 17th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 09 48, Dec +33 16 29)
Apparent size 0.6 by 0.25 arcmin; nothing else available
DSS of PGC 212477
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 212477; also see wide-field view of NGC 20

PGC 212478
A 17th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) is
Pegasus (RA 00 09 46, Dec +27 53 14)
Listed in NED as 2MASXJ00094590+2753144
Apparent size 0.4 by 0.25 arcmin
DSS of PGC 212478
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 212478; also see wide-field view of NGC 22

PGC 212482
An 18th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
PGC 212482 (RA 00 11 37, Dec +06 25 59)
Listed in NED as 2MASXJ00113687+0626003. Apparent size 0.4 by 0.15 arcmin; nothing else available
SDSS image of region near PGC 212482
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide region centered on PGC 212482; also see NGC 36

PGC 212878 (with
PGC 7359 = Arp 56)
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in Aries (RA 01 57 25, Dec +17 13 04)
Listed in NED as UGC 01432 NOTES01. Apparent size 0.1 by 0.1 arcmin
If at same distance as PGC 7359 (which see for images), about 10 thousand light years across

PGC 212906 (= 2MASXJ02040486+0247445 = UGC 01564 NOTES01)
A magnitude 16.5(?) spiral galaxy (type Sb? pec?) in
Pisces (RA 02 04 04.9, Dec +02 47 44)
Physical Information: An apparent companion or optical double with IC 197, so covered in the entry after that.

PGC 213183
A magnitude 15.5(?) lenticular? galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Perseus (RA 03 16 27.0, Dec +41 10 49)
Physical Information: Vr 4490 km/sec (see IC 308 for a wide-field image)

PGC 213835
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Ursa Major (RA 11 28 04.2, Dec +29 30 39)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 2220 km/sec, NGC 3687 is 100 to 105 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin, it is about 9 thousand light years across. The galaxy is listed in NED as 2MASXJ11280416+2930387, and as a starburst galaxy. Given the fact that its radial velocity is less than 300 km/sec smaller than that of its apparent companion (NGC 3687), it is possible that they are physical companions, and the somewhat peculiar appearance of the larger galaxy and the classification of the smaller galaxy as a starburst galaxy may at least indicate some kind of past interaction between the two; but I can find no mention of the possibility that they are connected, so barring further developments they should probably be treated as merely an optical double with a separation of 10 to 20 million light years, and their "peculiarities" as part of the normal range of galaxy types.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 213835, also showing part of NGC 3687
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 213835; see NGC 3687 for more images

PGC 214037 (probably a companion or part of
NGC 4793)
A magnitude 17.0(?) irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 54 45.4, Dec +28 55 31)
or a starburst region at the end of NGC 4793's southern arm,
or (most likely) a small galaxy interacting with NGC 4793 which is now both of the above
For anything else see this entry

PGC 214040 (a possible physical companion of
NGC 4807)
(= "NGC 4807A")

A magnitude 15.2 lenticular galaxy (type (R)SB0? pec) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 55 30.6, Dec +27 32 39)
For anything else, see this entry

PGC 214043 (a possible companion of
NGC 4837)
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type Scd?) in Canes Venatici (RA 12 57 00.0, Dec +48 18 30)
For anything else see this entry

PGC 214261
A magnitude 14.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Bo÷tes (RA 14 24 04.0, Dec +36 24 04)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 8540 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 214261 is about 395 to 400 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 385 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 390 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.85 by 0.25 arcmin, the galaxy is about 95 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 214261, also showing NGC 5616
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 214261, also showing NGC 5616
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 214261

PGC 273945
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type Irr S?) in
Tucana (RA 23 46 56, Dec -70 23 48)
About 0.3 by 0.3 arcmins apparent size
Near PGC 72371, which see for image of this galaxy

PGC 274070
A 14th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Tucana (RA 23 46 39, Dec -70 22 24)
About 0.3 by 0.3 arcmins apparent size
Near PGC 72371, which see for image of this galaxy


PGC 395160 (=
NGC 28 = PGC 730)
A magnitude 13.8 elliptical galaxy (type E0?) in Phoenix (RA 00 10 25.2, Dec -56 59 20)
(See NGC 28 for anything else.)

PGC 395521 (=
NGC 37 = PGC 801)
A magnitude 13.7 spiral galaxy (type (R')SAB0/a(s)?) in Phoenix (RA 00 11 22.9, Dec -56 57 26)
(See NGC 37 for anything else.)


PGC 446330
A magnitude 15.2 spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Telescopium (RA 19 58 48.2, Dec -52 16 33)
Based on a recessional velocity of 14825 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 446330 is about 690 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 650 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 665 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.7 by 0.2 arcmin, the galaxy is about 130 thousand light years across. Since its distance appears similar to that of IC 4917, they may be a physical pair; but there is no obvious interaction between them, so even if a physical pair they are probably a few million light years apart (as in the case of our galaxy and the Andromeda Galaxy).
DSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 446330
Above, a 0.8 arcmin wide DSS image of PGC 446330; west of IC 4917, which see for a wider view


PGC 516792 (a probable companion of
NGC 4835
A magnitude 15(?) irregular galaxy (type Im?) in Centaurus (RA 12 58 01.9, Dec -46 17 11)
For anything else see this entry



PGC 723295
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 08 48.0, Dec -29 56 45)
Listed in NED as 2DFGRSS360Z141. Based on a recessional velocity of 41670 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 723295 is about 1.8 billion light years away. However, for such a distant object, we need to take into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's journey. Doing so shows that the galaxy was about 1.6 billion light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1.7 billion years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the Universal expansion during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.27 by 0.14 arcmin, it is about 125 thousand light years across.
DSS of PGC 723295
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide "closeup" of PGC 723295
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also see the wide-field image of NGC 7
(Only the objects shown on the image of NGC 7 have been labeled in this image; any others will be labeled at a later date)
DSS of region near PGC 723295

PGC 724741
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 07 55.2, Dec -29 49 17)
Listed in NED as 2DFGRSS359Z122. Based on a recessional velocity of 18375 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 724741 is about 820 million light years away. However, for such a distant object, we need to take into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's journey. Doing so shows that the galaxy was about 765 million light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, about 785 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the Universal expansion during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.23 by 0.18 arcmin, it is about 50 thousand light years across.
DSS of PGC 724741
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide "closeup" of PGC 724741; also shown is PGC 724757
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also see the wide-field image of NGC 7
(Most of the objects in this image will be labeled at a later date)
DSS of region near PGC 724741

PGC 724757
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 07 50.4, Dec -29 49 14)
Listed in NED as 2DFGRSS278Z243. Based on a recessional velocity of 41820 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 724741 is about 1.85 billion light years away. However, for such a distant object, we need to take into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's journey. Doing so shows that the galaxy was about 1.6 billion light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1.7 billion years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the Universal expansion during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.27 by 0.18 arcmin, it is about 125 thousand light years across. For images, see PGC 724751.

PGC 783199
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 09 42, Dec -25 02 55)
Listed in NED as 2MASXJ00094154-2502547
Apparent size 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin; nothing else available
DSS of PGC 783199
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 783199; also see wide-field view of NGC 24

PGC 783608
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 10 11, Dec -25 00 46)
Not listed in NED. Apparent size 0.4 by 0.2 arcmin; nothing else available
DSS of PGC 783608
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 783608; also see wide-field view of NGC 24


PGC 816443 (with
PGC 12989 = NGC 1347 = Arp 39)

PGC 886037
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Hydra (RA 10 35 15, Dec -17 16 02)
No NED entry. Apparent size 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin; nothing else available
For images, see NGC 3290

PGC 896194
See
PGC 896194, on NGC Objects 7750 - 7799


PGC 911469 (= PGC 43725 = MCG -02-33-039 =
NGC 4756)
A magnitude 12.4 lenticular galaxy (type E/SA0?) in Corvus (RA 12 52 52.6, Dec -15 24 48)
For anything else see NGC 4756

PGC 919275 (=
IC 122)

PGC 937463
A 20th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Cetus (RA 00 16 53, Dec -13 29 34)
Listed in NED as APMUKS(BJ) B001420.48-134614.0, with coordinates and apparent size (0.13 by 0.11 arcmin) suggesting that it is a very faint extension of PGC 937493. The DSS image does show a faint smudge which may be a separate object, but the SDSS image does not; so the object may not exist, or may be a duplicate listing of PGC 937493 (which see).

PGC 937493
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Cetus (RA 00 16 47, Dec -13 28 40)
Listed in NED as APMUKS(BJ) B001414.17-134520.7. Apparent size 0.6 by 0.3 arcmin; nothing else available. "Associated" with PGC 937463, which may be a faint extension of the spiral, an independent galaxy, a nonexistent object, or a duplicate listing.
SDSS image of PGC 937493 and (perhaps) PGC 937463
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 937493; for a wide-field view, see NGC 62

PGC 950887 (=
IC 95)

PGC 956278
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Cetus (RA 00 11 04, Dec -12 11 59)
PGC identification is certain. Mousing over the Wikisky field near NGC 17 yields an identification as PGC 956278. Using the object's coordinates yields a NED listing for 2MASXJ00110416-1211586; HyperLeda then cross-references the object as PGC 956278, confirming the Wikisky identification. Note: searching for that name in Wikisky shows a completely different galaxy (PGC 56278); this is a common truncation error in the Wikisky search engine. Apparent size 0.45 by 0.3 arcmins; nothing else available.
DSS of PGC 956278
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 956278; also see the wide-field view of NGC 17

PGC 957826
A 17th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Cetus (RA 00 11 34, Dec -12 05 17)
PGC identification is based on HyperLeda, and mousing over the Wikisky field near NGC 17. Not listed in NED. Note: searching for PGC 957826 in Wikisky shows a completely different galaxy (PGC 57826), a common truncation error in the Wikisky search engine; use its coordinates for the correct result. Apparent size 0.42 by 0.25 arcmins; nothing else available.
DSS of PGC 957826
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide region centered on PGC 957826; also see the wide-field view of NGC 35

PGC 958282
An 18th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Cetus (RA 00 11 26, Dec -12 03 20)
No NED entry. Apparent size 0.3 by 0.15 arcmins; nothing else available
DSS of PGC 958282
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 958282; also see wide-field views of NGC 17 and 35

PGC 958866
A 17th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Cetus (RA 00 11 20, Dec -12 00 44)
No NED entry. Apparent size 0.4 by 0.25 arcmins; nothing else available
Note: A Wikisky search for PGC 958866 shows PGC 58866; use its coordinates for the correct result
DSS of PGC 958866
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 958866; also see wide-field view of NGC 17

PGC 979842 (= PGC 43715 = MCG -02-33-040 =
NGC 4757)
A magnitude 13.7 lenticular galaxy (type SAB0?) in Virgo (RA 12 52 50.1, Dec -10 18 36)
For anything else see NGC 4757

PGC 980503 (= PGC 43972 = MCG -02-33-056 =
NGC 4790)
A magnitude 12.4 spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)c?) in Virgo (RA 12 54 51.9, Dec -10 14 52)
For anything else see NGC 4790
Celestial Atlas
Miscellaneous PGC Objects (PGC 130000 - 999999)