Celestial Atlas
Miscellaneous PGC Objects (PGC 1000000 - 1999999) Link for sharing this page on Facebook
 The original Principal Galaxies Catalog contained 73,197 entries. Subsequent revisions have increased this to more than three million entries. I have no intention of covering all of those entries on this site, but there needs to be a place to list or discuss (if needed) any PGC entries referred to elsewhere, so this page (or if it grows too large some group of pages based on this page) will eventually list all such entries with PGC designations of 1,000,000 to 1,999,999.

Page last updated Apr 9, 2021

PGC 1000913
(= "NGC 4780A")

A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Virgo (RA 12 54 03.0, Dec -08 39 14)
For anything else see this entry

PGC 1028361
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Cetus (RA 00 17 31.3, Dec -06 48 45)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation for PGC 1028361; instead, it lists this galaxy as 2MASXi J0017313-064845.
Physical Information: The apparent size of PGC 1028361 is about 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below), but its distance is unknown, so its actual size is also unknown. For the same reason, whether it is a physical companion of NGC 64 or merely an optical double is also unknown.
SDSS image of region near NGC 64, also showing numerous PGC objects
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 64, showing PGC 1028361 and other PGC objects
Below, a 2 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 64, also showing PGC 1028361
SDSS image of NGC 64, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 1028361
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1028361
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1028361

PGC 1039683
A magnitude 16(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/SB0) in
Aquarius (RA 21 50 22.2, Dec -05 50 59)
Designation Note: Since this object has a PGC designation well beyond the scope of the original Principle Galaxy Catalog, a search for PGC 1039683 in the NED fails to return a result. However, a search for LEDA 1039683 will retrieve the page for this object.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation of 16080 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1039683 is about 745 to 750 million light years away, well beyond a single redshift-independent distance estimate of about 395 million light years (though the paper discussed in the HST press release puts the distance at about 800 to 805 million light years, more in line with the Hubble Flow distance). However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 700 to 705 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 720 to 725 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.22 by 0.19 arcmin, the galaxy is about 45 thousand light years across.
 The HST image of this galaxy is available not because of any particular interest in PGC 1039683, but because the dot inside the circle to the south southeast of the galaxy is the first identifiable object thought to have a medium-sized black hole inside it (that is, one that is much more massive than stellar-mass black holes, but much less massive than the supermassive black holes in the centers of large galaxies). The paper mentioned in the HST press release states that the dot is a large cluster of stars orbiting PGC 1039683 (suggesting that some of the other dots in the HST image of the galaxy are also globular clusters), and the medium-sized black hole inside the cluster has an estimated mass of about 50 thousand Solar masses.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 1039683
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 1039683
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1039683
Below, a 0.45 arcmin wide image of the galaxy (Image Credit NASA, ESA and D. Lin (University of New Hampshire))
HST image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1039683

PGC 1053358
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Cetus (RA 02 24 11, Dec -04 47 45)
Listed in NED as APMUKS(BJ) B022141.06-050119.0
Apparent size 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin; nothing else available
DSS of PGC 1053358
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 1053358; also see PGC 1053379

PGC 1053379
A 16th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Cetus (RA 02 23 55, Dec -04 47 39)
Based on recessional velocity of 13350 km/sec, about 600 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.45 by 0.45 arcmin, about 80 thousand light years across. PGC 1053379, 9113 (and presumably 9107), 1054270 and 3080366 all have similar recessional velocities (and presumably, distances). As a result, they may be a gravitationally bound group.
DSS of PGC 1053379
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 1053379
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; at top are PGC 9113 and 9107
Also shown are PGC Objects 1053358, 1054270, 1054693 and 3080366
DSS of region near PGC 1053379

PGC 1054270
A 17th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Cetus (RA 02 23 57, Dec -04 43 57)
Based on recessional velocity of 13175 km/sec, about 590 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.65 by 0.15 arcmin, about 110 thousand light years across. PGC 1054270, 9113 (and presumably 9107), 1053379 and 3080366 all have similar recessional velocities (and presumably, distances). As a result, they may be a gravitationally bound group.
DSS of PGC 1054270
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 1054270; also see PGC 9113

PGC 1054693
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Cetus (RA 02 24 15.5, Dec -04 41 53)
Listed in NED as APMUKS(BJ) B022145.06-045527.1
Apparent size 0.45 by 0.2 arcmin; nothing else available
DSS of PGC 1054693
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 1054693; also see PGC 9113

PGC 1097822 (with
PGC 30600 (= IC 609) = Arp 44)

PGC 1152096
An 18th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Pisces (RA 00 00 02, Dec -00 05 33)
Based on recessional velocity of 23430 km/sec, about 1 billion light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.25 by 0.15 arcmins, about 75 thousand light years in diameter.
SDSS image of PGC 1152096
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 1152096
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on PGC 7
SDSS image of region near PGC 1152096

PGC 1669768
A magnitude 16(?) spiral galaxy (type SB(rs)a? pec) in
Andromeda (RA 00 22 02.1, Dec +22 25 54)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation of PGC 1669768 for this galaxy; instead, it uses 2MASXJ00220205+2225531.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 21425 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PG 1669768 is about 995 to 1000 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 915 to 920 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 950 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 120 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 93, also showing NGC 90, NGC 91 and NGC 94 and PGC 1669768
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 93, also showing NGC 90, 91 and 94 and PGC 1669768
(Image Credit & © above & below Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona; used by permission)
(Composite image above is a Mount Lemmon image overlaid on a SDSS background to fill in eastern edge)
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide image of PGC 1669768
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of spiral galaxy PGC 1669768

PGC 1175571 (=
IC 88)

PGC 1220557 (= 2MASXJ09254198+0214234)
A magnitude 15.5(?) galaxy (type Sab?) in
Hydra (RA 09 25 42.0, Dec +02 14 23)
Physical Information: Sometimes suggested as a possible companion of NGC 2877, but more than twice as distant, so they are merely an optical double. Vr 17190 km/sec, z 0.057347.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 1220557, also showing NGC 2877
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 1220557, also showing NGC 2877
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1220557

PGC 1230543 (=
IC 91)

PGC1301720
A 12th-magnitude star in
Pisces (RA 00 19 10, Dec +06 29 29)
Shown on the wide-field view of NGC 75

PGC 1341667
A magnitude 17(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0/a?) in
Pisces (RA 00 07 27.3, Dec +08 12 21)
Note About Designation: A search of NED for PGC 1341667 returns no result; that database lists it as 2MASX J00072729+0812213.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 25315 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1341667 is about 1175 to 1180 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1065 to 1070 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1110 to 1115 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 75 to 80 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 1341667, also showing PGC 1342413 and NGC 3
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 1341667, also showing PGC 1342413 and NGC 3
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1341667

PGC 1342413
A magnitude 15.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Pisces (RA 00 07 41.1, Dec +08 14 05)
Note About Designation: A search of NED for PGC 1342413 returns no result; that database lists it as 2MASX J00074110+0814053.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 10580 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1342413 is about 490 to 495 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 470 to 475 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 480 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.45 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 60 to 65 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near lenticular galaxy PGC 1342413, also showing PGC 1341667 and NGC 3
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 1342413, also showing PGC 1341667 and NGC 3
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1342413

PGC 1431761 (= 2MASXJ13542913+1328068)
A magnitude 17(?) spiral galaxy (type S(rs)ab? pec) in
Bo÷tes (RA 13 54 29.2, Dec +13 28 08)
Note About Designation: A search of NED for PGC 1431761 returns no result. That database lists it as 2MASXJ13542913+1328068. (In the Hubble press release, it is only referred to as SDSS J1354+1328, but that is so "rough" a designation that it would be impossible to find it in any other database.)
Physical Information: PGC 1431761 is interacting with PGC 4539513, so the appropriate recessional velocity for determining their Hubble distance is the average of their recessional velocities. For PGC 1431761 that value is 19030 km/sec, and for PGC 4539513 it is 18980 km/sec. Based on their average recessional velocity of 19005 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that the pair is about 885 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the pair was about 820 to 825 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted (the Hubble press release that the HST image is taken from lists a value of about 800 million light years), about 845 to 850 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.23 by 0.1 arcmin, PGC 1431761 is about 55 thousand light years across. The apparent size of about 0.1 by 0.06 arcmin for PGC 4539513 corresponds to about 20 to 25 thousand light years, and the about 0.66 by 0.24 arcmin wide span of the regions ejected into intergalactic space corresponds to about 155 to 160 thousand light years.
 The interaction between the two galaxies is ionizing the green region to the southeast of PGC 4539513, and feeding material into a black hole on that galaxy's northwestern rim. The pink region shown there represents material falling into the black hole, and the purplish region are X-rays recorded by the Chandra X-ray space telescope. The system appears to be unique in that there is evidence for at least two such events (or "burps" of X-ray emission), separated by about 100 thousand years.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 1431761, also showing irregular galaxy PGC 4539513
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 1431761, also showing PGC 4539513
Below, a 0.75 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on the pair
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1431761, also showing irregular galaxy PGC 4539513
Below, a 0.5 by 0.7 arcmin wide X-ray and HST image of the pair superimposed on the SDSS image
(Image Credit X-ray NASA/CXC/University of Colorado/J. Comerford et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI); also see PGC 4539513
X-ray and HST image of spiral galaxy PGC 1431761 and irregular galaxy PGC 4539513 superimposed on an SDSS background

PGC 4539513 (= SDSSJ135429.05+132757.2)
Listed here instead of in numerical order because of its interaction with
PGC 1431761
A magnitude 17.5(?) irregular galaxy (type Irr? pec) in Bo÷tes (RA 13 54 29.1, Dec +13 27 58)
Note About Designation: A search of either NED or PGC for the PGC designation returns no result. Use SDSSJ135429.05+132757.2, instead. (In the Hubble press release, it is only referred to as SDSS J1354+1327, but that is so "rough" a designation that it would be impossible to find it in any other database.)
Physical Information: PGC 4539513 is interacting with PGC 1431761, so the appropriate recessional velocity for determining their Hubble distance is the average of their recessional velocities. For PGC 1431761 that value is 19030 km/sec, and for PGC 4539513 it is 18980 km/sec. Based on their average recessional velocity of 19005 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that the pair is about 885 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the pair was about 820 to 825 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted (the Hubble press release that the HST image is taken from lists a value of about 800 million light years), about 845 to 850 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.23 by 0.1 arcmin, PGC 1431761 is about 55 thousand light years across. The apparent size of about 0.1 by 0.06 arcmin for PGC 4539513 corresponds to about 20 to 25 thousand light years, and the about 0.66 by 0.24 arcmin wide span of the regions ejected into intergalactic space corresponds to about 155 to 160 thousand light years.
 The interaction between the two galaxies is ionizing the green region to the southeast of PGC 4539513, and feeding material into a black hole on that galaxy's northwestern rim. The pink region shown there represents material falling into the black hole, and the purplish region are X-rays recorded by the Chandra X-ray space telescope. The system is especially interesting in that there is evidence for at least two such events (or "burps" of X-ray emission), separated by about 100 thousand years.
X-ray and HST image of northwest region of irregular galaxy PGC 4539513, showing evidence of two episodes of X-ray emission by material falling into a black hole
Above, a ? arcmin wide X-ray and HST image of northwest region of PGC 4539513
For other images of the galaxy and its companion, see PGC 1431761

PGC 1455622
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 13 16 37, Dec +14 20 30)
Listed in NED as 2MASXJ13163736+1420297. Based on recessional velocity of 57780 km/sec (nearly 20% the speed of light), about 2.6 billion light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.17 by 0.13 arcmin, about 125 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of PGC 1455622
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the region near PGC 1455622
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are PGC 46225, 46234, and 1457659
SDSS image of region near PGC 1455622

PGC 1457659 (with
PGC 46225 = Arp 57)
A 17th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 16 48, Dec +14 25 15)
Listed in NED as Arp57 NED02. Apparent size 0.25 by 0.2 arcmin; nothing else available. See PGC 46225 for images.

PGC 1458619
An 18th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 13 16 37, Dec +14 27 29)
Listed in NED as 2MASXJ13163675+1427287. Based on recessional velocity of 31140 km/sec (about 10% of the speed of light), about 1.4 billion light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.35 by 0.15 arcmin, about 130 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of PGC 1458619
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the region near PGC 1458619
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Also shown in the wide-field view are PGC 46225, 46234, 1457659 and 1459772
SDSS image of region near PGC 1458619

PGC 1459772
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 13 16 39, Dec +14 29 59)
Listed in NED as SDSSJ131638.55+142958.7. Based on recessional velocity of 17995 km/sec), about 800 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin, about 50 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of PGC 1459772
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the region near PGC 1459772
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
Also shown in the wide-field view are PGC 46225, 46234, 1457659, 1458619 and 1461197
SDSS image of region near PGC 1459772

PGC 1461197
A 17th-(B)magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 13 16 32, Dec +14 33 32)
Listed in NED as 2MASXJ13163200+1433327. Based on recessional velocity of 19765 km/sec, about 880 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.25 by 0.25 arcmin, about 60 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of PGC 1461197
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the region near PGC 1461197
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown are PGC 1459772 and 1463376
SDSS image of region near PGC 1461197

PGC 1463376
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 13 16 49, Dec +14 38 43)
Listed in NED as 2MASXJ13164943+1438429. Based on recessional velocity of 49800 km/sec (more than 15% of the speed of light), about 2.2 billion light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin, about 160 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of PGC 1463376
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of the region near PGC 1463376
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy; also shown is PGC 1461197
SDSS image of region near PGC 1463376

PGC 1495040
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 08 46, Dec +15 51 42)
Listed in NED as SDSS J000846.00+155142.2. Based on recessional velocity of 12125 km/sec, about 540 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.32 by 0.21 arcmins, about 50 thousand light years in diameter.
SDSS image of PGC 1495040
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 1495040; also see wide-field view of NGC 14

PGC 1496172
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 09 02, Dec +15 54 34)
Listed in NED as 2MASX J00090205+1554338. Based on recessional velocity of 20895 km/sec, about 930 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.39 by 0.23 arcmins, about 100 thousand light years in diameter.
SDSS image of PGC 1496172
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 1496172; also see wide-field view of NGC 14

PGC 1496365
A 1magnitude 17(?) spiral galaxy (type SBb? pec) in
Pegasus (RA 00 09 07.8, Dec +15 55 04)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation for this object; instead, it uses the designation SDSS J000907.76+155504.3.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 16870 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1496365 is about 785 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 735 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 755 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin (from the images below, including its northwestern extension), the galaxy is about 75 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 1496365, also showing part of NGC 14
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on PGC 1496365, also showing part of NGC 14
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1496365

PGC 1563523
A magnitude 16(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 14 37.3, Dec +18 34 23)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation for this object; instead, it uses the designation 2MASXJ00143728+1834231.
Physical Information: PGC 1563523 has an apparent size of about 0.35 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below); but nothing is known about its distance or its actual size.
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy NGC 52, also showing several PGC objects, including PGC 1563523
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 52
Also shown are PGC objects 212489, 1561202, 1563523, 1564261 and 1565741
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 52, also showing PGC 1563523
SDSS image of spiral galaxy NGC 52, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 1563523
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1563523
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1563523

PGC 1570691
An 18th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 11 05, Dec +18 47 58)
Not listed in NED. Apparent size 0.35 by 0.25 arcmin; nothing else available
DSS of region near PGC 1570691
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the region near PGC 1570691; also see NGC 32

PGC 1591421
A magnitude 15.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type (R)S0(rs)a?) in
Leo (RA 09 53 05.1, Dec +19 24 50)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 7355 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1591421 is between 340 and 345 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was between 330 and 335 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, between 335 and 340 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.35 by 0.35 arcmin, the galaxy is about 35 thousand light years across.
 Since PGC 1591421's recessional velocity is only 260 km/sec less than that of NGC 3040, it is possible that instead of being the best part of 10 to 15 million light years apart the two galaxies might be a physical pair; but unlike the certainly incorrect pairing of NGC 3040 with PGC 200252, no one seems to have given any thought to the possibility that PGC 1591421 might be involved with the NGC object.
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1591421
Above, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1591421; see NGC 3040 for a wider view

PGC 1667882
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 21 10.1, Dec +22 19 40)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation of PGC 1667882; instead, it lists this galaxy as 2MASXJ00211007+2219401.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 6035 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 1667882 is about 280 million light years away. Given that and an apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 25 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near NGC 80, also showing NGC 81 and NGC 83 and several PGC objects
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 80
Also shown are NGC 81 and 83, and PGC 1666503, 1667882, 1668596, 1668790 and 3594311
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1667882
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1667882

PGC 1668790
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 21 08.3, Dec +22 22 40)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation of PGC 1668790; instead, it lists this galaxy as 2MASX J00210826+2222400.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5710 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 1668790 is about 265 million light years away. Given that and an apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.08 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 20 to 25 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near NGC 80, also showing NGC 81 and NGC 83 and several PGC objects
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 80
Also shown are NGC 81 and 83, and PGC 1666503, 1667882, 1668596, 1668790 and 3594311
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1668790
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1668790

PGC 1670567
A magnitude 15.5 lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 22 13.9, Dec +22 28 24)
Note About Designation: NED recognizes the LEDA designation of PGC 1670567.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5855 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 1670567 is about 270 to 275 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 40 thousand light years across. Barring a very large peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocity relative to NGC 94, the two galaxies are probably companions, and perhaps a gravitationally bound pair.
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter image of region near NGC 94, also showing NGC 90, NGC 93 and NGC 96
Above, a 12 arcmin wide image centered on NGC 94, also showing NGC 90, 93 and 96
(Image Credit & © above and below Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona; used by permission)
(overlaid on an SDSS background to show regions not covered by the Mount Lemmon image)

Below, a 1.4 arcmin wide image of NGC 94 and its probable companion, PGC 1670567
(superposition of SDSS and Mount Lemmon Skycenter images)
Superposition of SDSS and Mount Lemmon Skycenter images of NGC 94, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 1670567
Below, a 0.55 arcmin wide image of PGC 1670567 (Image credit as above)
Superposition of SDSS and Mount Lemmon Skycenter images of lenticular galaxy PGC 1670567

PGC 1754508 (= PGC 1754516)
An 18th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 09 34, Dec +25 54 17)
Not listed in NED. Apparent size 0.3 by 0.15 arcmin; nothing else available
SDSS image of region near PGC 1754508
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 1754508; also see wide-field view of NGC 23

PGC 1762846
(to be added ASAP)

PGC 1757813 (= PGC 1757814)
An 18th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 10 13, Dec +25 58 48)
Not listed in NED. Apparent size 0.3 by 0.2 arcmin; nothing else available
SDSS image of region near PGC 1757813
Above, a 2.4 arcmin closeup of PGC 1757813; also see wide-field view of NGC 23

PGC 1762846 (and with
SDSS J131446.02+260629.8 = Arp 60)
A 16th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 14 47.1, Dec +26 06 25)
Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies does not always make it clear which object is the one shown for a given Arp listing. One unfortunate result of this is that most references show different entries, or even no entry at all for Arp 60 (Examples: A Wikimedia listing of Arp objects simply identifies it as "Arp 60". A Wikisky search for Arp 60 shows an essentially empty field about 2 arcmin south of the correct position. A LEDA search for Arp 60 yields PGC 46036, which is about 3 arcmin northwest of the correct position.) Fortunately, the correct object (PGC 1762846, as shown above) does lie within the general area of the incorrect listings, and an NED search for Arp 60 shows the correct object (though unfortunately, with an image so poor that it is hard to accept it as an example of a spiral galaxy with a small high surface brightness companion, which is a requirement for Arp listings in this numerical range; it also doesn't help that the only NED entry that allows a comparison with the LEDA database is the object's 2MASS position). Still, as the top two images below show, the field of view for that galaxy is the same as the one in Arp's catalog, so the identification above is certain.
    Based on a recessional velocity of 21520 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 1762846 is just over 1000 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us into account. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 920 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 955 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.35 by 0.35 arcmin, the galaxy is about 95 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of spiral galaxy PGC 1762846, which is the main component of Arp 60, and its apparent companion, SDSS J131446.02+260629.8
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of the region near PGC 1762846 (compare to the image below)
Below, the corresponding Arp Atlas plate verifies the identification (Image Credits: Arp Atlas)
Arp Atlas image of Arp 60, oriented to verify that PGC 1762846 and SDSS J131446.02+260629.8 are the correct identification
Below, a 12 arcmin wide region centered on the galaxy
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 1762846 and its apparent companion, SDSS J131446.02+260629.8, which comprise Arp 60
Below, a labeled view of same field also shows PGC Objects 46036, 1759456, 1762076 and 1762948
SDSS image of region near spiral galaxy PGC 1762846 and its apparent companion, SDSS J131446.02+260629.8, which comprise Arp 60; also shown are PGC 46036, 1759456, 1762076 and 1762948

SDSS J131446.02+260629.8 (with
PGC 1762846 = Arp 60)
Not a PGC object, but listed here as the companion that makes PGC 1762846 = Arp 60
An 18th or 19th type galaxy (type S? Irr?) in Coma Berenices (RA 13 14 46.0, Dec +26 06 30)
Nothing known save for its apparent size of 0.16 by 0.07. If at the same distance as PGC 1762846 (which see for images), about 40 thousand light years across; but in the absence of further evidence, the two galaxies may be merely an optical double.

PGC 1770479
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type Sb?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 12 39 02.8, Dec +26 17 19)
Vr 22825 km/sec (z = 0.076135), apparent size 0.4 by 0.15 arcmin. In close proximity to IC 3614, which see for images.

PGC 1801452
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Pegasus (RA 23 39 02, Dec +27 13 24)
Part of Abell 2634, the Pegasus II cluster of galaxies. Based on recessional velocity of 10370 km/sec, about 460 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.6 by 0.4 arcmins, about 80 thousand light years in diameter. See PGC 85597 for a closeup of PGC 1801452, and PGC 72000 for a wide-field view of the region around these galaxies.

PGC 1816642 = PGC 1816670
A 17th-magnitude spiral galaxy (type S?) in
Pegasus (RA 00 08 41, Dec +27 44 13)
NED lists as 2MASXJ00084122+2744128. Apparent size 0.25 by 0.17 arcmins; nothing else available.
DSS of PGC 1816642
Above, a 1.2 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 1816642; also see the wide-field image of NGC 16

PGC 1818016
A magnitude 10.5 star in
Pegasus (RA 00 07 02, Dec +27 47 23)
See NGC 1 for a wide-field image showing PGC 1818016

PGC 1850802 (= PGC 43939
= CGCG 159-116 = CGCG 160-011 = UGC 8033 =
NGC 4793)
A magnitude 11.6 spiral galaxy (type SAB(rs)c) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 54 40.6, Dec +28 56 19)
For anything else see NGC 4793

PGC 1874251
A 12th-magnitude star in
Andromeda (RA 00 22 41, Dec +29 40 39)
See the wide-field view NGC 97 for the position of the putative PGC object

PGC 1879115
A 10th-magnitude star in
Andromeda (RA 00 22 25, Dec +29 48 50)
DSS of region near NGC 97
See the wide-field view NGC 97 for the position of the putative PGC object

PGC 1883375
A magnitude 16.5(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 19 29.1, Dec +29 55 33)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation for PGC 1883375; instead, it lists this galaxy as 2MASXJ00192910+2955337.
Physical Information: PGC 1883375 has an apparent size of about 0.25 by 0.15 arcmin (from the images below), but its distance is unknown, so its actual size is also unknown.
SDSS image of region near NGC 76, showing numerous PGC objects
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 76 and PGC 1266
Also shown are PGC 1880257, 1883375, 1885526 and 1886792
Below, a 0.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 1883375
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 1883375

PGC 1887687
A 15th magnitude UV source in
Andromeda (RA 00 18 37.8, Dec +30 02 10)
Probably a stellar source, based on its appearance in the image shown for PGC 1208
Celestial Atlas
Miscellaneous PGC Objects (PGC 1000000 - 1999999)