Celestial Atlas
Miscellaneous PGC Objects (PGC 3000000+) Link for sharing this page on Facebook
 The original Principal Galaxies Catalog contained 73,197 entries. Subsequent revisions have increased this to more than three million entries. I have no intention of covering all of those entries on this site, but there needs to be a place to list or discuss (if needed) any PGC entries referred to elsewhere, so this page (or if it grows too large some group of pages based on this page) will eventually discuss all such entries with PGC designations of 3,000,000 or greater.

Page last updated Apr 10, 2021
Checking LEDA search engine for PGC 4677013++

PGC 3080366
A 16th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Cetus (RA 02 24 04, Dec -04 48 12)
Based on recessional velocity of 13140 km/sec, about 590 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.6 by 0.6 arcmin, about 100 thousand light years across. PGC 3080366, 9113 (and presumably 9107), 1053379 and 1054270 all have similar recessional velocities (and presumably, distances). As a result, they may be a gravitationally bound group.
DSS of PGC 3080366
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide region centered on PGC 3080366; also see PGC 1053379

PGC 3093693 (=
IC 47)

PGC 3096774 (with
PGC 47334 = IC 4271 = Arp 40)

PGC 3098124 (with
PGC 26132, = Arp 55)
A 16th-magnitude galaxy (type ?) in Lynx (RA 09 15 55, Dec +44 19 52)
Listed in NED as UGC 04881 NED02. Based on recessional velocity of 11780 km/sec, about 530 million light years away. Given that and apparent size of 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin, about 30 thousand light years across. Its larger companion (PGC 26132, which see for images of the pair) is listed in NED as UGC 04881 NED01. Its recessional velocity of 11920 km/sec would imply it is at essentially the same distance, even without the obvious interaction between the two galaxies. Note: The only magnitude listed is for radio wavelengths, so the optical magnitude is based on a comparison of its appearance to that of its companion and nearby galaxies of known brightness. The actual value could be as much as a magnitude fainter.


PGC 3111352
A magnitude 17(?) lenticular galaxy (type E/S0?) in
Pisces (RA 00 15 59.7, Dec -00 18 18)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize the LEDA designation; instead, it lists this galaxy as SDSSJ001559.71-001817.7.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 11910 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 3111352 is about 555 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 530 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 540 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.13 by 0.08 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 20 thousand light years across. NGC 60 and PGC 3111352 have very similar recessional velocities, and given the appearance of the larger galaxy, are probably at the same distance from us and gravitationally interacting.
SDSS image of region near NGC 60
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 60
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 3111352, PGC 4676913 and NGC 60
SDSS image of NGC 60, also showing lenticular galaxy PGC 3111352 and PGC 4676913
Below, a 0.25 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 3111352
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 3111352

PGC 3166720 (= UGC 2369 = PGC 10938 + PGC 10939)
A pair of galaxies in
Aries (RA 02 54 01.8, Dec +14 58 28)
Note: PGC 3166720 is not recognized by a search of the LEDA database, but is listed here since that is the LEDA designation for UGC 2369, which is the name used for the pair of galaxies. For anything else, see PGC 10938 and PGC 10939

PGC 3121899
A magnitude 18(?) lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Virgo (RA 12 07 35.5, Dec +02 40 44)
Note About Designation: NED does not recognize PGC 3121899, but does accept a search for LEDA 3121899 .
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 23135 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 3121899 is about 1075 to 1080 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 985 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1020 to 1025 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below), the galaxy is about 85 thousand light years across. Although apparently close to NGC 4116, it is (as indicated by the preceding distance information) a much more distant background galaxy. It is a Seyfert galaxy (type Sy1).
SDSS image of NGC 4166 and lenticular galaxy PGC 3121899
Above, a 3.25 by 4.2 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 4116, also showing PGC 3121899
(See NGC 4116 for a 12 arcmin wide image of the region)
Below, a 0.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 3121899
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 3121899

"PGC 3155754" (= ESO 577-PN 024 = P-K 318+41 01 = Abell 36)
A magnitude 11.6 planetary nebula in
Virgo (RA 13 40 41.4, Dec -19 53 07)
Note About PGC Designation: For purposes of completeness, LEDA often assigns a PGC designation to objects even if they aren't galaxies; but in most such cases (including this one), a search of the database for the designation returns no result, hence its being shown in quotes.
Physical Information: Abell 36 is a planetary nebula about 780 light years from Earth. Given that and its apparent size of about 7.5 by 5.5 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 1.7 light years across. The central star is a white dwarf with a temperature of about 75000 K, so most of its light is in the ultraviolet, and is ionizing the nebula ejected from the star between 5 and 8 thousand years ago.
Wikimedia Commons image of region near planetary nebula ESO 577-24, also known as Abell 36
Above, a 12 arcmin wide Wikimedia Commons image centered on Abell 36
(Image Credit above & below Wikimedia Commons, Schulman telescope)
Below, a 9 arcmin wide Wikimedia Commons image of the planetary nebula
Wikimedia Commons image of planetary nebula ESO 577-24, also known as Abell 36
Below, a 6.75 by 7.35 arcmin wide image of the planetary nebula (Image Credit ESO)ESO image of planetary nebula ESO 577-24, also known as Abell 36

PGC 3194215
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 08 30.2, Dec -29 55 02)
Listed in NED as 2DFGRSS359Z106 . Based on a recessional velocity of 47695 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 3194215 is about 2.13 billion light years away. However, for such a distant object we have to take into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's journey. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1.8 billion light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1.9 billion years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the Universal expansion during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.18 by 0.14 arcmin, it is about 90 thousand light years across.
DSS of PGC 3194215
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide "closeup" of PGC 3194215; for a wide-field image, see NGC 7

PGC 3194224
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type ?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 08 13.4, Dec -29 55 59)
Listed in NED as 2DFGRSS359Z113. Based on a recessional velocity of 37425 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 3194224 is about 1.67 billion light years away. However, for such a distant object we have to take into account the expansion of the Universe during its light's journey. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 1.45 billion light years away when the light by which we see it was emitted, about 1.55 billion years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the Universal expansion during that time). Given that and its apparent size of 0.19 by 0.15 arcmin, it is about 80 thousand light years across.
DSS of PGC 3194224
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide "closeup" of PGC 3194224
Also shown are PGC 3194227 and NGC 7 (which see for a wide-field image)

PGC 3194227
A 19th-(B)magnitude galaxy (type S?) in
Sculptor (RA 00 08 11.6, Dec -29 55 21)
Listed in NED as 2DFGRSS359Z115. Apparent size 0.3 by 0.13 arcmin; nothing else available
See PGC 3194224 for a "closeup" of PGC 3194227; for a wide-field image, see NGC 7

A LEDA search for PGC designations greater than about 3500000 usually returns no result; in such cases, the designation is (or will soon be) placed in quotes.

"PGC 3517717" (=
NGC 4833)
(= GCL 21 = ESO 065-SC004)

A magnitude 8.4 globular cluster (type VIII) in Musca (RA 12 59 35.0, Dec -70 52 36)
For anything else see NGC 4833

"PGC 3518304" (=
NGC 4815)
(= OCL 893 = ESO 096-SC001)

A magnitude 8.6 open cluster (type I3m) in Musca (RA 12 58 01.0, Dec -64 58 00)
For anything else see NGC 4815

"PGC 3518665" =
NGC 4755, the Jewel Box
(= OCL 892 = ESO 131-SC016)

A magnitude 4.2 open cluster (type I3r) in Crux (RA 12 53 34.0, Dec -60 22 54)
For anything else, see NGC 4755

"PGC 3594311"
A magnitude 14.8 lenticular galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Andromeda (RA 00 21 13.5, Dec +22 20 46)
Note About Designation: Despite the fact that LEDA lists this object as PGC 3594311, neither an NED or LEDA search for that designation returns any result (hence the quotes around the PGC designation); instead, both databases list this object as 2MASX J00211353+2220461.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5370 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), PGC 3594311 is about 250 million light years away. Given that and its apparent size of about 0.3 by 0.3 arcmin (from the images below), it is about 20 thousand light years across.
SDSS image of region near NGC 80, also showing NGC 81 and NGC 83 and several PGC objects
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on NGC 80
Also shown are NGC 81 and 83, and PGC 1666503, 1667882, 1668596, 1668790 and 3594311
Below, a 2.4 arcmin wide SDSS image of NGC 80, also showing PGC 1668790 and 3594311
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy NGC 80, also showing PGC 3594311 and part of PGC 1668790
Below, a 0.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of PGC 3594311
SDSS image of lenticular galaxy PGC 3594311

"PGC 4126457"
A mangitude 18(?) compact galaxy (type S0/a?) in
Bo÷tes (RA 14 30 35.6, Dec +11 52 27)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 54705 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 4126457 is about 2550 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 2070 to 2075 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 2255 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.06 by 0.04arcmin, the galaxy is about 35 thousand light years across. Given its enormous distance, although it appears to be on the western rim of NGC 5647, it is actually many times further away. (Note: The galaxy is usually referred to as SDSS J143035.62+115226.5, but is also listed in LEDA as PGC 4126457; however, a search of the database for the PGC designation returns no result, hence the quotes around the designation.)
SDSS image showing PGC 4126457, NGC 5647, and some other apparent companions of the NGC object
Above, a 1.4 arcmin wide SDSS image showing PGC 4126457 and NGC 5647
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image showing the PGC object and only part of the NGC object
SDSS image of PGC 4126457 and part of NGC 5647

"PGC 4628293" (a probable companion of
NGC 4848)
(LEDA ABELL1367:[GP82]4475
= NED ABELL 1656:[GMP83] 4475 = GMP 4475)

A magnitude 18.9 spiral galaxy (type SBdm?) in Coma Berenices (RA 12 58 05.6, Dec +28 15 05)
For anything else, see this entry

"PGC 4628454" (= [IBG2003] J130009+275140)
A magnitude 18.4(?) irregular galaxy (type IBm?) in
Coma Berenices (RA 13 00 09.0, Dec +27 51 40)
Note About Magnitude: The position given in SIMBAD corresponds to the faint star on the northwestern rim of the galaxy, and its magnitude may not correspond to the galaxy itself, but the galaxy plus the star. However, the listed recessional velocity is certainly that of a galaxy, and the LEDA and NED positions lie exactly on the galaxy, so hopefully the following information is more or less correct.
Note About Designation: LEDA assigns the PGC designation shown above, but a search of the database for that designation returns no result, hence its being placed in quotes. A search for the IBG designation returns a result in both the LEDA and NED databases, but save for a position search, no result is returned for a search in SIMBAD, and as noted above, that returns the position of the foreground star, not the galaxy itself.
Note About Classification: A 2007 paper lists this as a spiral, but the HST image does not resemble any kind of normal spiral, so I have classified it as an irregular galaxy. Since, as noted below, it may be a physical companion of PGC 44716, its structure may be strongly influenced by that larger galaxy.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 5170 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), "PGC 4628454" is about 240 million light years away, the same distance derived for PGC 44716, the spiral galaxy to its north in the images below; so they may well be physical companions. As noted in the entry for PGC 44716, that object is almost certainly one of the nearer members of the Coma Cluster of galaxies, and it and "PGC 4628454" may be moving through the cluster at a considerable velocity, so the actual distance is probably closer to the roughly 320 million light year distance of the Cluster than to the 240 million light years obtained in this paragraph. Using a presumed distance of about 300 million light years, the apparent size of about 1.5 by 0.75 arcmin (from the images below) corresponds to about 13 thousand light years, making it a dwarf galaxy; and since dwarf galaxies are more likely to be irregular than spiral, the classification as an irregular galaxy is probably correct.
SDSS image centered on 'PGC 4628454', also showing NGC 4876 and NGC 4898
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on "PGC 4628454", also showing NGC 4876 and 4898
Below, a 1.8 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy and three of its nearest neighbors
(PGC 44709, PGC 44716 and PGC 126762)"
SDSS image showing irregular galaxy 'PGC 4628454', also showing PGC 44709, PGC 44716 and PGC 126762
Below, a 1.75 by 1.25 arcmin wide HST image of the region (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, Cramer et al.)
Also shown, in false-color, is the gas torn from PGC 44716 by ram-pressure stripping
(Note: The HST press release understates the apparent size of the region)
HST image showing spiral galaxy PGC 44716 and the gas torn from it by ramjet-pressure stripping, also showing PGC 44709, PGC 126762 and 'PGC 4628454'
Below, a 0.7 by 0.75 arcmin wide HST image of the region near 'PGC 4628454'
Also shown are PGC 44709 and PGC 44716 (Image Credit as above)
HST image showing spiral galaxy PGC 44716; also shown are PGC 44709 and 'PGC 4628454'
Below, a 2 arcmin wide HST image of "PGC 4628454"
HST image of irregular galaxy 'PGC 4628454'

PGC 4676913
An elliptical galaxy (type E5?) or emission region in
Pisces (RA 00 15 59, Dec -00 17 53)
Not listed in NED, but despite having a LEDA designation that normally returns no result, a search for PG 4676913 does show the object listed here, hence the designation not being in quotes. Either a star-forming region in NGC 60, or (perhaps more likely) a background galaxy of unknown distance. Apparent size about 4 by 2 arcsec, but in the absence of any further information, its actual size is unknown.
SDSS image of NGC 60, also showing PGC 3111352 and 4676913
Above, a 2.4 arcmin wide closeup of PGC 4676913 and NGC 60, which see for a wide-field image

WORKING HERE: Checking LEDA search engine

PGC 4677013 = (PGC 4677027)
A star-forming region in
NGC 99 (RA 00 24 01, Dec +15 46 04)
Listed in HyperLeda as a galaxy, but without any information save for its position, which is the same as what appears to be a star-forming region in NGC 99 (as shown in the 2.4 arcmin wide view below). Note: Presumably the same object as PGC 4677027, as their listed positions are identical.
SDSS image of NGC 99, showing putative PGC 4677013

PGC 4677027 (=
PGC 4677013)

PGC 5056954
A magnitude 20.5(?) spiral galaxy (type SB(r'l)a?) in
Ursa Major (RA 10 07 01.6, Dec +67 49 39)
Note About the NED Designation: NED incorrectly lists this galaxy as identical to PGC 29388, using the designation LEDA 5056954; but it is actually a far more distant background galaxy seen through the sparse stellar content of the foreground galaxy (a dwarf elliptical galaxy only about 10 to 15 million light years from us). Because of that NED error, the images below include all those posted at the entry for PGC 29388, plus the highest resolution image of PGC 5056954 that can be obtained from the HST press release for PGC 29388.
Note About The Apparent Magnitude: It is difficult to find apparent magnitudes for galaxies fainter than magnitude 20 unless they have been the object of special study, and PGC 5056954 is definitely fainter than any of those that I could find values for, but the limit for DSS images is about magnitude 21, and the galaxy is easily visible on them as an apparent (but misleading) center for the dwarf elliptical lying in front of it (which is actually harder to see in low-resolution images than its far more distant "companion"), so I have estimated its apparent magnitude as 20.5; but as the question-mark indicates, that is merely an educated guess, not an actual measurement.
Note About the PGC Designation: Usually, a search of the LEDA database for any PGC designation over about 3500000 returns no result; but in this case, a search of the database does return a result, and the scant information provided here is taken from the brief entry in the LEDA database, and the HST image below.
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background of 57630 km/sec (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 5056954 is about 2685 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 2160 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 2360 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the 200 million light year expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.085 by 0.075 arcmin (from the images below), PGC 5056954 is about 50 to 55 thousand light years across.
Note About Cosmological Distances: While the light from PGC 5056954 was en route to us, the galaxy itself was being carried away from us by the expansion of the intervening space; so although it was only about 2160 million light years from us when the light by which we see it left it, it is now about 2575 million light years away, so in the last 2360 million years, the galaxy moved about 425 million light years further away from us, making it a truly "far more distant" object than the dwarf elliptical lying between us. Still, in comparison to galaxies near the apparent "edge" of the Observable Universe, PGC 5056954 is relatively close, and we see it more nearly "as it is" than any of the extremely distant objects that are of greatest interest to cosmologists.
SDSS/DSS composite image of region near dwarf elliptical galaxy PGC 29388, also showing PGC 5056954
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS/DSS composite image centered on PGC 29388 and PGC 5056954
Below, a 2.5 arcmin wide SDSS image of the two galaxies
SDSS image of dwarf elliptical galaxy PGC 29388, also showing PGC 5056954
Below, a 1.75 by 3.5 arcmin wide HST image (Image Credit ESA/Hubble & NASA, T. Armandroff)
HST image of dwarf elliptical galaxy PGC 29388, also showing numerous far more distant galaxies scattered around and behind it, including PGC 5056954
Below, a 0.2 arcmin wide HST image of PGC 5056954 (Image Credit as above)
HST image of spiral galaxy PGC 5056954, as seen through stars near the center of PGC 29388

"PGC 5067440" =
NGC 4768)
A magnitude 13.4 star in Virgo (RA 12 53 17.2, Dec -09 31 54)
For anything else see NGC 4768

"PGC 5067498" =
NGC 4769)
A magnitude 13.2 binary star in Virgo (RA 12 53 17.8, Dec -09 32 14)
For anything else see NGC 4769

"PGC 5067761 (=
NGC 4844)
Probably a magnitude 13.5(?) star in Virgo (RA 12 58 08.2, Dec -13 04 51)
For anything else, see NGC 4844

PGC 5072710 (Pisces A)
A magnitude 17(?) irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in
Pisces (RA 00 14 46.0, Dec +10 48 47)
Physical Information: PGC 5072710's recessional velocity of 235 km/sec is too small to be a reliable distance indicator, peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities being comparable to its Hubble expansion velocity, so the corresponding Hubble distance of only 10 million light years is only about half the best current redshift-independent distance estimate of about 20 million light years. Given that and the galaxy's apparent size of about 0.65 by 0.45 arcmin (from the HST image below), it is about 3600 light years across, making it a dwarf irregular. Like Pisces B, it is believed that the galaxy had little opportunity to form stars while it was in the Local Void, a nearly empty region about 150 million light years across, but its motion through space has moved it into a region filled with other galaxies and intergalactic material, and triggered a burst of star formation less than a hundred million years ago. For a detailed NASA post about the galaxy, use the link in the credit line for the HST image. Note: Though listed as PGC 5072710 in the LEDA database, a search of the database for that designation returns no result; a useful search requires the name Pisces A (this is generally true for any LEDA entry above about PGC 3500000, making the PGC designation useful only as a way of deciding where to put the object in a catalog such as this one).
SDSS image of region near the dwarf irregular galaxy Pisces A
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Pisces A
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of the dwarf irregular galaxy Pisces A
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide HST image of the same region (Image Credit NASA, ESA, and E. Tollerud (STScI))
HST image of the dwarf irregular galaxy Pisces A

PGC 5072711 (Pisces B)
A magnitude 17(?) irregular galaxy (type Irr?) in
Pisces (RA 01 19 11.7, Dec +11 07 18)
Physical Information: PGC 5072711's recessional velocity of 620 km/sec is too small to be a reliable distance indicator, peculiar (non-Hubble expansion) velocities being comparable to its Hubble expansion velocity, but the corresponding Hubble distance of 25 to 30 million light years is close to the best current redshift-independent distance estimate of about 30 million light years. Given that and the galaxy's apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.25 arcmin (from the HST image below), it is about 4200 light years across, making it a dwarf irregular. Like Pisces A, it is believed that the galaxy had little opportunity to form stars while it was in the Local Void, a nearly empty region about 150 million light years across, but its motion through space has moved it into a region filled with other galaxies and intergalactic material, and triggered a burst of star formation less than a hundred million years ago. For a detailed NASA post about the galaxy, use the link in the credit line for the HST image. Note: Though listed as PGC 5072711 in the LEDA database, a search of the database for that designation returns no result; a useful search requires the name Pisces B (this is generally true for any LEDA entry above about PGC 3500000, making the PGC designation useful only as a way of deciding where to put the object in a catalog such as this one).
SDSS image of region near the dwarf irregular galaxy Pisces B
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered on Pisces B, also showing NGC 5645 and PGC 5523597
Below, a 1 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of the dwarf irregular galaxy Pisces B
Below, a 1 arcmin wide HST image of the same region (Image Credit NASA, ESA, and E. Tollerud (STScI))
HST image of the dwarf irregular galaxy Pisces B

PGC 5523597
A magnitude ? galaxy (type unknown) in
Virgo (RA 14 30 41.7, Dec +07 14 25)
Physical Information: Based on a recessional velocity of 127130 km/sec, a straightforward calculation indicates that PGC 5523597 is about 5920 million light years away. However, for objects at such distances we should take into account the expansion of the Universe during the time it took their light to reach us. Doing that shows that the galaxy was about 2350 million light years away at the time the light by which we see it was emitted, about 4510 million years ago (the difference between the two numbers being due to the expansion of the intervening space during the light-travel time). Given that and its apparent size of about 0.5 by 0.5 arcmin, the galaxy is about 35 thousand light years across. (Note: NED lists this galaxy as SDSS J143041.72+071424.5, while LEDA lists it as SDSSJ143041.73+071424.5 and as PGC 5523597, but a search of the database for the PGC designation returns no result.)
SDSS image of region near distant galaxy PGC 5523597
Above, a 12 arcmin wide SDSS image centered near PGC 5523597, also showing NGC 5645 and Pisces B
Below, a 0.6 arcmin wide SDSS image of the galaxy
SDSS image of distant galaxy PGC 5523597
Celestial Atlas
Miscellaneous PGC Objects (PGC 3000000+)