Celestial Atlas
PGC 63000 - 63499 ←PGC Objects: PGC 63500 - 63999 Link for sharing this page on Facebook→ PGC 64000 - 64499
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Last updated Aug 3, 2021

PGC 63718 (=
IC 4900)
(= ESO 233-002)

A magnitude 15.4 spiral galaxy (type Sbc?) in Telescopium (RA 19 50 22.1, Dec -51 20 45)
See IC 4900 for anything else

PGC 63719
A magnitude 17(?) spiral galaxy (type Sdm?) in
Telescopium (RA 19 50 23.3, Dec -51 20 27)
Physical Information: Apparent size 0.2 by 0.15 arcmin? Nothing else known. See IC 4900 for images.

PGC 63748 (= HCG 86B)
(= PGC 161777 = MCG -05-47-003)
(= part of
Hickson Compact Group 86)
A magnitude 14(?) elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Sagittarius (RA 19 51 59.0, Dec -30 48 58)
Physical Information: Since PGC 63748 is a member of a gravitationally bound quartet, its distance should be based on a combination of the information available for all four galaxies. How I combined that information is shown in the entry for HCG 86A (PGC 63753), which see; the result is about 265 million light-years. Using that and its apparent size of about 0.9 by 0.7 arcmin (from the images below), PGC 63748 is about 70 thousand light-years across.
Note About Images Below: In the ESO image, it appears that there is a multitude of galaxies in the region, and in particular, the two objects to the right (west) of PGC 63749, about which the ESO press release only says "the bright objects to the right of the elongated galaxy are not part of the quartet"; but as shown in the DSS image of HCG 86, those two objects and almost everything in the image except for the HCG 86 galaxies are actually stars in our own galaxy, and only appear to be galaxies in the ESO image because of the way that the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) users turned the "raw" images into the one in their press release.
ESO/DSS composite image of elliptical galaxy PGC 63748, also known as HCG 86B, a member of Hickson Compact Group 86; also shown are PGC 63749, 63752 and 63753
Above, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS composite image centered on PGC 63748 (Image Credit ESO/Ragusa, Spavone et al.)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS image of HCG 86 (Image Credit as above)
ESO/DSS image of region near Hickson Compact Group 86
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of HCG 86 shows that many of the apparent galaxies in the ESO image are stars
DSS image of region near Hickson Compact Group 86
Below, a 1.5 arcmin wide ESO image of PGC 63748 (Image Credit as for the first image)
ESO image of elliptical galaxy PGC 63748, also known as HCG 86B, a member of Hickson Compact Group 86

PGC 63749 (= HCG 86D)
(= PGC 161774 = MCG -05-47-001)
(= part of
Hickson Compact Group 86)
A magnitude 15(?) lenticulargalaxy (type SA0/a) in Sagittarius (RA 19 51 52.0, Dec -30 48 31)
Physical Information: Since PGC 63749 is a member of a gravitationally bound quartet, its distance should be based on a combination of the information available for all four galaxies. How I combined that information is shown in the entry for HCG 86A (PGC 63753), which see; the result is about 265 million light-years. Using that and its apparent size of about 0.75 by 0.35 arcmin (from the images below), PGC 63749 is about 55 to 60 thousand light-years across.
Classification Note: The nucleus of PGC 63749 does not show any sign of a bar, so it is usually classified as an SA0 galaxy; however, the ESO image has a linear structure running through the nucleus and parallel to the axis of the galaxy, suggestive of a disklike structure more typical of spiral galaxies. For that reason I have added (as some references do) the "/a" to indicate an object on the borderline between a lenticular and spiral galaxy.
Note About Images Below: In the ESO image, it appears that there is a multitude of galaxies in the region, and in particular, the two objects to the right (west) of PGC 63749, about which the ESO press release only says "the bright objects to the right of the elongated galaxy are not part of the quartet"; but as shown in the DSS image of HCG 86, those two objects and almost everything in the image except for the HCG 86 galaxies are actually stars in our own galaxy, and only appear to be galaxies in the ESO image because of the way that the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) users turned the "raw" images into the one in their press release.
ESO/DSS composite image of lenticular galaxy PGC 63749, also known as HCG 86D, a member of Hickson Compact Group 86; also shown are PGC 63748, 63752 and 63753
Above, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS composite image centered on PGC 63749 (Image Credit ESO/Ragusa, Spavone et al.)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS image of HCG 86 (Image Credit as above)
ESO/DSS image of region near Hickson Compact Group 86
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of HCG 86 shows that many of the apparent galaxies in the ESO image are stars
DSS image of region near Hickson Compact Group 86
Below, a 1.2 arcmin wide ESO image of PGC 63749 (Image Credit as for the first image)
ESO image of lenticular galaxy PGC 63749, also known as HCG 86D, a member of Hickson Compact Group 86

PGC 63752 (= HCG 86C)
(= PGC 161776 =MCG -05-47-002)
(= part of
Hickson Compact Group 86)
A magnitude 15(?) lenticular galaxy (type SB0, SB0/a) in Sagittarius (RA 19 51 57.4, Dec -30 51 24)
Physical Information: Since PGC 63752 is a member of a gravitationally bound quartet, its distance should be based on a combination of the information available for all four galaxies. How I combined that information is shown in the entry for HCG 86A (PGC 63753), which see; the result is about 265 million light-years. Using that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), PGC 63752 is about ? thousand light-years across.
NED .57 x .44 arcmin
Note About Images Below: In the ESO image, it appears that there is a multitude of galaxies in the region, and in particular, the two objects to the right (west) of PGC 63749, about which the ESO press release only says "the bright objects to the right of the elongated galaxy are not part of the quartet"; but as shown in the DSS image of HCG 86, those two objects and almost everything in the image except for the HCG 86 galaxies are actually stars in our own galaxy, and only appear to be galaxies in the ESO image because of the way that the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) users turned the "raw" images into the one in their press release.
ESO/DSS composite image of lenticular galaxy PGC 63752, also known as HCG 86C, a member of Hickson Compact Group 86; also shown are PGC 63748, 63749 and 63753
Above, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS composite image centered on PGC 63752 (Image Credit ESO/Ragusa, Spavone et al.)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS image of HCG 86 (Image Credit as above)
ESO/DSS image of region near Hickson Compact Group 86
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of HCG 86 shows that many of the apparent galaxies in the ESO image are stars
DSS image of region near Hickson Compact Group 86
Below, a ? arcmin wide ESO image of PGC 63752 (Image Credit as for the first image)
ESO image of lenticular galaxy PGC 63752, also known as HCG 86C, a member of Hickson Compact Group 86

PGC 63753 (= HCG 86A)
(= ESO 461-007 = MCG -05-47-004)
(= part of
Hickson Compact Group 86)
A magnitude 13.5(?) elliptical galaxy (type E2) in Sagittarius (RA 19 52 08.8, Dec -30 49 32)
Physical Information: Since PGC 63753 is a member of a gravitationally bound quartet, its distance should be based on a combination of the information available for all four galaxies. The following paragraph describes how I determined that distance, which was then used for all four entries (PGC 63748, 63749, 63752 and this entry).
 The four galaxies' recessional velocities relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation are (in order of their HCG 86 designations) 5830, 5685, 5135 and 5745 km/sec (the differences in the individual values are almost certainly "peculiar velocities", or random motions relative to their neighbors, which can be very large in rich or closely bound clusters). The average of those values is just under 5600 km/sec. Based on that CMB recessional velocity (and H0 = 70 km/sec/Mpc), HCG 86 is about 260 million light-years away, in fair agreement with redshift-independent distance estimates of about 275 to 310 million light-years (the ESO press release uses a value of "about 270 million light-years" for the cluster, and is therefore in the same ballpark). Redshift-independent distance estimates tend to have a wide range, so the relatively small difference between the CMB distance estimate and that range doesn't mean much; but the ESO value may be based on information not currently available to me, and perhaps be more accurate than the other estimates. So I feel that the best "educated guess" for the distance of the cluster is about 260 to 270 million light-years, or to use a specific number, about 265 million light-years. Using that and its apparent size of about ? arcmin (from the images below), PGC 63753 is about ? thousand light-years across.
NED 1.2 x 0.7 arcmin Note About Images Below: In the ESO image, it appears that there is a multitude of galaxies in the region, and in particular, the two objects to the right (west) of PGC 63749, about which the ESO press release only says "the bright objects to the right of the elongated galaxy are not part of the quartet"; but as shown in the DSS image of HCG 86, those two objects and almost everything in the image except for the HCG 86 galaxies are actually stars in our own galaxy, and only appear to be galaxies in the ESO image because of the way that the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) users turned the "raw" images into the one in their press release.
ESO/DSS composite image of elliptical galaxy PGC 63753, also known as HCG 86A, a member of Hickson Compact Group 86; also shown are PGC 63748, 63749 and 63752
Above, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS composite image centered on PGC 63753 (Image Credit ESO/Ragusa, Spavone et al.)
Below, a 12 arcmin wide ESO/DSS image of HCG 86 (Image Credit as above)
ESO/DSS image of region near Hickson Compact Group 86
Below, a 12 arcmin wide DSS image of HCG 86 shows that many of the apparent galaxies in the ESO imageare stars
DSS image of region near Hickson Compact Group 86
Below, a ? arcmin wide ESO image of PGC 63753 (Image Credit as for the first image)
ESO image of elliptical galaxy PGC 63753, also known as HCG 86A, a member of Hickson Compact Group 86

PGC 63956 (=
IC 4919)
(= ESO 185-043)

A magnitude 14.3 spiral galaxy (type SB(s)dm? pec) in Telescopium (RA 20 00 08.9, Dec -55 22 26)
See IC 4919 for anything else

PGC 63958 (= part of
IC 4919)
A star-forming region in Telescopium (RA 20 00 09.2, Dec -55 22 31)
Physical Information: A star-forming region in IC 4919, which see for anything else
Celestial Atlas
PGC 63000 - 63499 ←PGC Objects: PGC 63500 - 63999→ PGC 64000 - 64499